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Shame or fame for Chester?

Chester's regional airport security clusterduck cont/-
 Blush

Via the Oz today:

Quote:Regional airlines resist moves to ramp up terror security
[Image: 9ed91801e59116837b9762cf7ac70254?width=650]
The Regional Aviation Association has warned against increased security measures in regional airports.
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM August 11, 2017
  • EAN HIGGINS
Regional airlines have closed ranks to fight any move by Transport Minister Darren Chester to have them step up security following the alleged terror plot to bring down an airliner.

Regional Express has warned against “giving in to hysteria” by requiring more extensive screening of passengers and carry-on bags, saying to do so for “all such potential targets would be so prohibitively expensive and onerous that normal life would be shut down”.

“Smaller regional aircraft carry fewer passengers than most buses and it would be senseless to enforce screening on the former while leaving vulnerable the tens of thousands of buses plying the streets each day,” a Rex statement said.

Regional Aviation Association chief executive Mike Higgins said if the current regulation requiring the screening of passengers on airliners weighing more than 20 tonnes were extended to smaller aircraft, “then the smaller operators will not fly”.

Mr Higgins said he feared the government’s desire to be seen to act could nip in the bud moves by the Office of Transport Security to actually reduce the cost of screening at regional airports.

The pushback follows Mr Chester’s decision last week, revealed by The Australian, to order his departmental secretary to review regional airport security following claims from airline pilots, union leaders and security experts that regionals represent the weak spot in the aviation sector attractive to terrorists.

Mr Higgins said that ironically, the review being carried out by senior OTS official Garth Donovan was looking at options to reduce costs to regional airlines of security screening, and should be almost complete.

Such adjustments could involve not putting all passengers through a walk-through metal detector, but randomly checking some with a handheld device, he said. Similarly, rather than have an X-ray machine screen every piece of carry-on luggage, some bags could be randomly examined by hand.

Mr Higgins said he feared Mr Chester’s desire to be seen to be tough on airport security could push Mr Donovan’s review “to one side”. Mr Donovan declined to comment.

The Australian last week revealed that at Wagga Wagga airport in regional NSW, QantasLink flights to Sydney flying Q400 aircraft that can carry up to 76 passengers have to screen passengers and their carry-on luggage.

However, Rex, which on that route flies Saab 340s that can carry 34 passengers but weigh less than 20 tonnes, is exempt, and passengers can walk unchallenged onto the aircraft.

Mr Higgins said this made sense; “it depends on the risk appetite for the passenger” which airline they flew.

Considerable discussion developed last week about flights from Port Lincoln in South Australia, where screening was removed in 2015 when Qantas put on two Q300 aircraft, which can carry 56 passengers but weigh under 20 tonnes. Qantas spokesman Stephen Moynihan said the motivation was operational efficiency, not security savings.

& from the other side of the cyclone security fence... Big Grin

Quote:Ground crew screen plea ignored

[Image: 0277e451de5600fdb85a8b03324d969e]12:00amEAN HIGGINS

The government has passed on a call to require airside staff to go through security screening.

& via a NX MR... Wink

Quote:Aviation Security: Loophole Motion Defeated

10 August 2017
HOW SERIOUS IS THE GOVERNMENT ABOUT AIRPORT SECURITY?

Senator Nick Xenophon is gobsmacked the Federal Government and the Opposition today voted down his move to close a loophole which allows some airport staff to avoid mandatory screening.

Baggage handlers, catering and ground service staff with Aviation Security Identification Cards are not subjected to the same screening procedures which apply to passengers, pilots and cabin crew.

" I have great respect for the work that ground crew at airports do, but this loophole fails to pass the most cursory of pub tests” said Nick.

Government , Labor and Greens Senators combined to defeat the motion.

“It's quite disappointing considering the assurances the Government gave after the recent terror-related arrests that security at our airports was being boosted,” Senator Xenophon said.

The Australian Airline Pilots Association (AusALPA), the peak body representing  professional pilots (including commercial airline pilots) has previously raised serious concerns over the inconsistencies in security screening but their alarms constantly been ignored.  

“ Well it's happened again," Nick remarked.

“How can the Government continue to ignore the peak body representing 5000 commercial aircraft pilots?

“ Australian travellers are going to trust the opinion of an experienced pilot over a politician any day when it comes to measures that will improve airline safety.”

Senator Xenophon says he won't be giving up on having the loophole closed.

Link:https://nick.nxtmps.org.au/media/release...-defeated/


MTF...P2 Confused
Reply
Chester softcocks the Carmody delay on drone review - Dodgy

Reference Drone Wars: Post #37 & #38

Quote:Oz Flying..

"CASA's discussion paper on drone regulation is now ready for industry comments. This may be just a fringe issue to many of us who are still struggling with AirVenture, Part 61, rising rents, SIDs and every other spear in the side that is depleting our lifeblood at the moment, but you can bet it's very important to the drone community, which I have no doubt will be pouring feedback into CASA. If the general aviation community takes a stand-off approach to this, then the feedback from the drone people is all they will have. It's probably a critical enough issue for general aviation to take notice and speak up, or we certainly won't be listened to on this topic in the future."


In a nutshell - time for a recreational GA summit. Sort it out then act as one. Lead or follow, but don't get under anyone's feet.

In a follow-up to the above I note that our totally inept, WOFTAM of a miniscule put out a belated press release yesterday, that pays homage to the CASA initiative of putting out a discussion paper 10 months after Chester called for the review:

Quote:Aviation Safety Drone Discussion Paper released
Media Release
DC234/2017
11 August 2017

  • Discussion Paper sets out Australian and international aviation safety regulatory arrangements covering remotely piloted aircraft, commonly referred to as drones
  • Paper seeks industry and community comment on potential future regulatory approaches to cover the emerging and increased application of drone technology
Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester has welcomed the release of a discussion paper focusing on the regulation of remotely piloted aircraft (RPA)—or drone—operations and air safety.

Mr Chester said the Civil Aviation Safety Authority's (CASA) paper would give the wider community, as well as government agencies and industry, the opportunity to have input into consideration of future safety regulation of drones.

“Drones are a rapidly growing part of the aviation sector, and we must get the balance right between ensuring the safety and security of the public, and avoiding unnecessary red tape,” Mr Chester said.

“As the paper indicates, aviation safety regulators around the world are facing challenges in maintaining high levels of safety without unnecessarily impeding opportunities to use drones for industry and recreational applications.”

The discussion paper seeks comment on five key aviation safety issues:
  • drone registration;
  • training and education of drone operators;
  • geo-fencing;
  • counter drone technology; and
  • future approaches to drone aviation safety regulation.
Mr Chester said the review would take into account technological and operational growth of the RPA community, and developments in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other international aviation safety agencies.

“I encourage interested parties to make a submission,” Mr Chester said.

The discussion paper is available online: consultation.casa.gov.au/.
  
[Image: puke-Bucket.jpg]

 
 Puke..retch - UDB! Dodgy


MTF...P2  Cool

Ps Remember this?
Quote:9 September 2016

F16/4491
Seeking access to risk assessments for the changes to CASR Part 101 to determine any possible risk or hazard it would present to current aviation activities and the general public. (2.59mb)

 FF based their whole revision/amendment to CASR Part 101 on the above FOI'd research paper (which they just so happened to have sponsored); yet Chester does not even berate Carmody for taking 8 months to respond to his called for review and 10 months to put in place a consultative industry stakeholder discussion paper - Dodgy
Reply
Of secret squirrels and lying toads.

As the long awaited release of the latest attempt at probity, from ATSB on the appalling mess made of the first ‘investigation’ of the Pel-Air ditching is imminent, we thought it germane to make mention of a small, but significant side bar to the never ending saga. Before the big guns come out and the incident is lost in the noise the ‘new’ report will (no mistake about it) generate.

Back in June, this year we all hoped that for Karen Casey the trauma, trials and tribulations resulting from the Pel-Air ditching were over and her life could return to as near normal as possible, considering the injuries, both physical and mental.

"I’ve moved the thread to the Hall of Shame simply because it represents one of the most shameful episodes in a very long list which may be sheeted home to ‘the system’. A system which allows a regulatory authority to escape, without penalty their disgraceful  actions: a system which allows the accident investigation authority to escape, without penalty their disgusting actions; a system in which the Crown Minister responsible may not be held accountable, or even need defend the actions of the authorities."

Not to be it seems. It appears that there was an ‘intercept’ on Karen’s electronic communications. Why is anyone’s guess, however the list of potential candidates with the ‘authority’ to do this is fairly short, the list of motives for doing such is limited and the choice of who benefited most by doing so is, again, fairly short.

Lets assume, for a moment that the interception is proven - beyond reasonable doubt. Take it personally – think of it as your communications being intercepted. Then answer the questions – what would you like do about it? And what do you think you could actually do about it?

Well, those are the questions KC has asked PAIN and answer we must.

There exists a line of communication between Karen and her prime suspect – CASA. If it weren’t so serious it would be hilarious, CASA have offered to run and manage  the investigation. Can you believe it? The sheer audacity is mind-blowing. We will, today, begin beating the drums for advice; and see what sort of assistance we can shake out of the trees. The only piece of considered advice we can offer at the moment is do not allow CASA to investigate their own actions; history, fact and a mountain of evidence provides clearly defined reasons supporting that advice. Of all the reasons CASA is distrusted, self investigation is right up at the top of the pile; just below their treatment of ‘evidence’.

Sit tight Kaz – let’s see what the day brings; but go with the FOI request, it could be enlightening and probably be a handy thing for the real investigators to have.

Toot – that’s not all – toot. MTF.
Reply
BRB verdict - 6D Chester is 'Our Greatest Aviation Disaster' (OGAD) 

Referencing the SBG - “Will you walk into my parlour?” - & today's Ferryman post #136 off the Alphabet's thread... Wink

Quote:The worm turns.

Legend has it that Marie Antoinette kicked off the French revolution by telling the hoi-polloi to bugger off and eat cake. Conversely, great leaders like Churchill understood the people and could manage to move them to extraordinary heights and efforts. Our Darren 6D ain’t quite as pretty as old Marie and no where near as bright as Winston; but he has managed an extraordinary feat. One which every other minister and DoIT leader has carefully avoided for decades; unification of an industry group, led by the AOPA. No smoke, no mirrors, I wonder why ever not?

[Image: DJVywyoVoAA-Od0.jpg]

Never, in field of Australian aviation conflict has so much been done by one man to stuff up the status quo. Well done 6D – you’ve pissed ‘em all off, the whole bunch, now you must answer for your purblind folly. I shall try to explain it to you, just so as you understand why resignation is your only honourable course; redemption is out of the question. You see, setting fire to ones feet to keep ones hands warm has never been a very good idea.

History first: recent, the Pel-Air incident and Senate inquiry exposed the tip of an ugly, dangerous, government sponsored iceberg. The real CASA and ATSB were revealed for what they truly are – official – in the Senate. Everyone knew it, but fear and the lack of a platform to voice their anger prevented reform and change taking place. Pel-Air prompted the ASSR, which was a gentile, civilised document, offering a way to repair the damage and move forward. Had the ASRR been honestly taken up and supported, matters aeronautical would have improved, quietly, with the blood letting done in private. It was a beacon of hope held dear, by those who would have been satisfied by a quiet, no fuss revolution. Hopes of real reform were high, the mood buoyant. Those hopes were cynically crushed, the light of meaningful reform ruthlessly extinguished. You can’t do that to folk – not without some sort of push back.

Where it is.

[Image: Pollies_TW_2016_CB82A5C0-1576-11E6-99C802D27ADCA5FF.jpg]

Moving on to the present day – we must look at the gross errors you have made. For a start, you fail (dismally) to understand pilots; particularly the Australian version; bad blue. In secundus, you have failed, miserably to understand why the long, (30 years) loud calls for reform have not abated. Then you must ask why it has been so? Once you understand these things you may glean the reason for the underlying anger, which has developed into open outrage. The final part of your lesson is the AOPA gathering at Orange, yesterday.

Where it should have been.

[Image: r0_0_5184_3456_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg]

This could be the beginning of the long awaited revolution – and you, Darren 6D, caused it. Well, you and whatever fools you listen to; those who provide slick, easy escape paths, all of which lead, eventually, to an untenable position. By excluding and actively trying to destroy the AOPA a weapon has been forged. How long do you think it’s going to be before the Aero clubs and their members realise that by using one AOC and the provisions for ‘remote’ base operations the call for independent instructors may be satisfied, like it or not. When they quite legally run around the false objections and return learning to fly, in country centres, to  part of a vibrant industry section, what then? Do the math; AOPA, without attracting any further support, is now a major force (by the numbers) and growing, determinedly so; with lots of support. Dare you keep sulking and pretending they ain’t real? Don’t forget the USA chapter have weighed in, you are staring down a big number of people now. Bluff, bluster and bull-shit will only get you a ticket on the train wreck.

Well done 6D – your arrogance, ineptitude and ignorance have released the force that thirty years of divide and conquer has carefully kept quiescent; unification, aligned anger and the numbers to make it stick. Bravo - duck wit.

Well done AOPA and all those who attended. May the force be with you.

Toot - toot.

The BRB has voted.. Rolleyes  And the majority verdict is that Chester is without peer our worst miniscule for Non-Aviation ever and therefore the greatest aviation disaster to be inflicted on a long suffering but once flourishing GA industry... Dodgy

However if your still not convinced here is an article, courtesy of the UK division of the RAES, which IMO provides a perfect parallel about the importance of government support in nurturing the smaller end of town aviation industry... Wink :

Quote:Future of UK Airfields
24 October 2017
No.4 Hamilton Place, London
Conference
09:00-17:00

The UK is home to a number of airfields and aerodromes dotted across the country, supporting a wide range of important General Aviation (GA) activities, including flight training, light aircraft manufacture and maintenance and business aviation. However, the number of airfields has been falling and more are under threat of closure, to be replaced by large housing developments in some cases, and with a number of market and policy conditions hindering the opening of new airfield sites.

In July, the UK Government published its draft Aviation Strategy – Beyond the Horizon: The Future of UK Aviationfor public consultation.  While already making commitments to reform public policy and regulation to support the sector in its 2015 General Aviation Strategy following the GA Red Tape Challenge in 2013/14, the Government are keen to better understand a number of issues affecting GA, including the reasons for the closure of some smaller airports, airfields and airstrips and the impacts this trend could have on GA and aviation sector more widely.  The Government also wish to understand whether it is possible to identify or create a strategic network or level of infrastructure to enable GA to continue its valuable role.

The Royal Aeronautical Society wants to help bring the sector together to help provide some answers to these questions posed by Ministers in the draft Strategy, as well inputting into the work of the new All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on GA, recently set up to promote the GA sector in Parliament.  We are very fortunate in that the chair of the APPG on GA and keen pilot, Rt. Hon. Grant Shapps MP, has already agreed to speak at our conference.  The conference is expected to cover some of the following issues affecting the future of UK airfields and hopefully provide some practical solutions, including: planning policy and legislation, regulation, the role of local authorities, taxation and finance, access to airspace.
 
Spot the difference... Rolleyes


MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
MRO rules: Harmonise or miss the boom - Undecided

Yet another issue that if not proactively addressed by Government could lead to the further decline of yet another vital sector of the General Aviation industry, via the Oz today: 

Quote:Get training up to speed ‘or miss out on maintenance boom’


[Image: 88d0ff331bb2aee630528251023f8b7f?width=650]
Jobs at the airport.

Australian industry risks missing out on a boom in aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul without reforms to bring training and licensing into line with international standards, it has been warned.

The UNSW Business School’s Ian Hampson has renewed calls to align Australian maintenance training and licensing rules with international standards.

“Not to do so will leave Australian industry out of the maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) boom,” he said.

He made the comments after a recent workshop to canvass maintenance training and licensing and amid expectations that in Asia, the MRO industry could provide a big export market for Australia.

It is expected that demand for maintenance will grow as airlines add to their fleets because passenger traffic is estimated to almost double over the next 20 years, ­according to estimates by the International Air Transport ­Association.

There are concerns that the licensing system, set out in part 66 of Australia’s civil aviation safety regulations, is not fully harmonised with the European Aviation Safety Agency, meaning Australian licence holders can’t easily get them recognised overseas.

He also said providers of ­licence training were subject to regulations from the vocational education and training sector as well as the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, “and these are sometimes inconsistent, leading to fragmentation and inconsistency of output”.

And there was difficulty meshing EASA’s “knowledge modules” with the use of a “training packages” that are a key feature of Australia’s VET system, he said.

CASA is reviewing part 66 and an industry working group is expected to develop specific change proposals.

The comments come amid growing focus on the sector. A ­serious bungle by TAFE SA has left its aircraft maintenance ­engineering students in limbo.

Meanwhile, an aviation training school established by the Queensland government has flagged it wants to establish courses in other states.

CASA has been investigating since April TAFE SA’s licensed aircraft maintenance engineer training course at Parafield ­Airport.

About 90 engineers have had parts of their licences suspended and no new students have been accepted into the TAFE SA course after CASA found ­students were not assessed to the correct standards and exams had raised questions as to whether they were taught the right skills.

TAFE SA operates a “maintenance training organisation” under approvals issued by CASA.
There are only three other centres in the country offering the training; at TAFE NSW, Aviation Australia and Federation Training in Gippsland, Victoria.

Aviation Australia, established in Brisbane by the Queensland government in 2001, has since expanded to Cairns, Melbourne, Sydney and Shanghai, and has a joint venture in Saudi Arabia.

The company, which also offers EASA part 66 basic knowledge training, is looking to expand further.

The aircraft maintenance engineering courses are government-subsidised in Queensland, Victoria and the Northern Territory and in a statement posted on its website this week the company says it is working to establish government-funded courses in other states.

Asked whether South Australia was a focus, a spokeswoman for Aviation Australia said: ­“Aviation Australia has and will continue to deliver training ­nationally to those seeking quality and compliant qualifications.”

TAFE SA governance and research director Roslyn Agate said it was committed to remain as one of four training centres in Australia for licensed aircraft maintenance engineers.

“TAFE SA executive has discussed the continuation of the aviation training program and is committed to its ongoing delivery,” Ms Agate said.

“TAFE SA is continuing to work very closely with CASA as we have done in the last few months and we expect these issues to be resolved in the near ­future.”

A CASA spokesman said its inquiries were “progressing” as “we are still working through their (TAFE SA’s) revised manuals and other material”.

And of course this will just support the BRB verdict and add to the legend of Chester  as 'Our Greatest Aviation Disaster' - Blush

On a hopefully more positive note, apparently the Australian Aviation Associations Forum convened a meeting in Can'tberra yesterday and at this stage there are no reports of open warfare or blood in the gutters - Big Grin

Quote:A great meeting today in Canberra with the members of the TAAAF.  Departing now for YSBK.

[Image: DJqSGjJUEAEnjP3.jpg]


3:21 PM - 14 Sep 2017

https://twitter.com/aopaaustralia/status...0407501824
 

MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
The irony P2 is of course, even if you complete the convoluted, extremely expensive process and achieve a piece of paper from CAsA that says you are an engineer, the piece of paper is fairly useless as your qualification is not recognised in the real world. Those irascible old grey beards who actually knew how to fix things are a dying breed, once they are gone, what hope for the young'uns deluded enough to try and navigate their way through the CAsA inspired trash will ever gain the knowledge that could have been passed to them from their experience.
When it is cheaper to ferry a GA aircraft back to the USA to complete "heavy" maintenance, speaks volumes for the state the MRO industry has reached. I would love to know just how much CAsA's ineptitude, ignorance, and arrogance adds to the cost of changing a spark plug.
Reply
ASAP - Spot the disconnect... Huh

Have been tasked by Aunty Pru and the BRB to undertake a review of Chester's latest cynical attempt to placate/obfuscate the GA & Airline industry Alphabets and their concerns, through the formation of the CASA administered Aviation Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) forum.

I say 'cynical' because as we all know the ASAP does not include either AOPA or AMROBA:

Quote:In order to establish the widest possible industry representation and expertise, the following individuals will serve as members of the ASAP for a period of two years, from 1 July 2017:
  • Mr Rob Sharp, Group Executive, Virgin Australia
  • Mr John Gissing, Group Executive, Qantas Group
  • Ms Caroline Wilkie, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Airports Association
  • Mr Greg Russell, Honorary Chair, The Australian Aviation Associations Forum (TAAAF)
  • Mr Jim Davis, Chairman, Regional Aviation Association of Australia and TAAAF member
  • Mr Michael Monck, Chairman, Recreational Aviation Australia and TAAAF member.
The Group Manager, Aviation Group and Group Manager, Stakeholder Engagement Group will represent CASA.

However it is worth reading the ASAP Terms of Reference as it would appear that there is some possible wriggle room for Carmody to rectify Chester's vainglorious effrontery and bias against these two vital GA Alphabets:
Quote:3.1 ASAP membership consists of between six and ten individuals representing the aviation community who have agreed to serve as members, plus two representatives nominated by CASA.

3.2 The CEO/DAS will seek membership nominations in order to establish the widest possible industry representation and expertise and invite individuals to serve as members of the ASAP for a period of two years.

3.4 To ensure there is a sufficient number of qualified members on the ASAP at all times, individual appointments may be made for different terms in the first instance to allow for staggered tenures.
    
Hmm...think I can feel an Aunty Pru/BRB sales pitch coming on... Rolleyes

I also found the TAC section of interest:
   
Quote:5. Technical Advisory Committees

5.1 The ASAP may establish Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) for referring specific issues within an industry sector, subject matter or domain for advice.

5.2 Where established, TACs will provide a forum in which broader industry members and relevant technical experts can provide their input to the ASAP on specific technical issues and proposals.

5.3 Members of the TACs serve without remuneration and accept that they, or the organisations they represent, will bear the costs involved in their participation in TAC meetings and related work.

5.4 On the initial establishment of the ASAP, the TACs will reflect the former Sub‐Committees of the Standards Consultative Committee.

5.5 On the initial establishment of the ASAP, the interim members of the TACs will reflect the existing membership of the former SCC Sub‐Committee.

5.6 Any TACs will be tasked by the ASAP directly and do not determine their own work programs.

5.7 For minor technical matters where urgent advice is sought, the tasking can come directly from the CEO/DAS, following consultation with the chair of the ASAP.

"...will reflect the existing membership of the former SCC Sub‐Committee..." 

Despite Chester's intent to isolate and marginalise the AOPA/AMROBA engagement with CASA, those two Alphabets feature more than once within the former SCC sub-committees, see here:
Quote:Former Standards Consultative Committee (SCC) sub-commitees archive

The content on this page is provided to assist research and may contain references to activities or policies that have no current application.

The former SCC sub-committees were: Last updated: 19 September 2017 P2 comment: Passing strange that the webpage has just been updated today - Shy   
    
Within the SCC sub-committee webpages I note that with the exception of the Medical and UAS standards sub-committees, according to the agenda item and meeting minutes the committees have been dormant for 2 or more years. This is despite there having been many regulatory review issues that these sub-committees would normally have been consulted on... Huh

In reviewing the last minutes (1 April 2014) of the Operational Standards sub-committee - Meeting 28 minutes - I noted a number of significant agenda items still not resolved and/or very much relevant to today's regulatory environment... Rolleyes


Quote:Item 3. CASR operational parts updates and discussion

3.1 Stuart Jones gave a presentation on the development and progress of CASR Part 91.

Discussion followed the presentation. Dick MacKerras asked whether there would be any further consultation on the Part. John Grima indicated that there would be no further consultation as the consultation process had been completed and feedback from the previous processes had been incorporated. CASA is obliged to conduct a PIR and this will be the next phase of formal consultation.

Some further discussion ensued regarding the strict liability drafting style, including how to reconcile the inherent conflict between strict liability and promoting a safety culture. CASA is obliged to follow Government policy on legislative drafting, so this is a matter for the Commonwealth to consider...


3.5 Stuart Jones then presented on the proposed CASR Part 135...

...Part 135 proposes that operations to remote islands must nominate suitable alternate. Dick MacKerras said that it was difficult for operations to meet requirement for alternate for Cocos-Keeling, and should be different to other islands because of distance away.

3.6 Dale South then presented on Draft CASR Part 138

Part 138 applies to both aeroplane and helicopter aerial work (AWK). It is proposed that Part 119 AOC holders (for air transport) will also need a Part 138 certificate to also do aerial work operations, but it is envisaged they could structurally include aerial work procedures under the coverage of their exposition, particularly if there is a cross over with aircraft and crew. The issue though still remains regardless of where these are contained they must comply with the Part 138 requirement and would be subject to the conditions of their 138 certificate if one was needed for the task performed. The Part 138 structure should remove the need for CASA to issue exemptions, especially for low-risk operations.

Part 138 includes provision for an ‘AWK passenger’ in addition to a task specialist. A task specialist is not a passenger, and is defined as being essential for conducting the aerial work purpose. They would be suitably trained in safety actions. AWK passengers may be those who are made aware of risks and those who don't have the opportunity to be made aware of risks associated with AWK operation (eg a person being recovered from the sea in a SAR operation).

AWK passenger definitions would only apply in relation to the AWK activity, potentially in an approved ‘AWK Zone’ for example firefighting operations; when transported by air at other times they would be air transport passengers. This Aerial work passenger policy relates to concept of informed consent. Similarly, police operations involving taking people into custody during a tactical police operation would differ from flights which are regularised prisoner transport.

Medical transport operations are proposed to be regulated as Air Transport. NPRM on this was released last year and the summary of responses is currently being drafted.

It is likely that some relief will be made in the operational Parts in relation to some AT standards. This then becomes more aligned with other countries' categorisation, which useful as the AOC would be also recognised overseas.

5. A320 operations on 30m runways (in particular the Sunshine Coast upgrade) – (Ron Stacey, AFAP)

Ron Stacey queried the building work at the SC airport. He advised he was concerned that runway excursions continue to occur and the building work represents a higher level of risk if aircraft leave the runway. He does not agree with the policy of leaving the decision to operators to use narrow runways based on flight manual supplements.

Ron advised he will make it known that these runways shouldn't be used by aircraft which he believes require wider runways. Ron advised doesn’t believe that simulator models provide an accurate simulation of actual performance of aircraft. He also doesn’t believe that the relative cost of runway upgrades is significant. He said that pilots should not be blamed for running off of a narrow runway.

David Yeomans indicated that the SC airport master plan was available on-line, including substantial runway discussion.

Mal McGregor indicated that Part 139 of CASR is generally consistent with Annex 14. Airport design no longer requires nomination of a ‘model aircraft’ for which the runway is suitable.

Miles Gore-Brown indicated that CAR 235A and CASR 139 require operators to upgrade to ICAO standards. What CASA is doing is in agreement with what Ron is saying, but de-linked from aircraft operations. Not all aerodromes can be upgraded as some were built prior to the implementation of aerodrome codes. B737 and A320, and other aircraft have manufacturer-approved flight manual supplements that allow them to operate on narrow runways too. All have demonstrated maximum crosswind limits, but some have theoretical limits which puts pilots in a ‘test pilot position’.
 
There was obvious heated but constructive debate amongst the Operational Standards sub-committee this I believe is a good thing and hopefully after a 2 year hiatus the TAC process can get back on track under the new ASAP system.

However I fear the effectiveness of such industry engagement forums will be severely compromised if the Chester prejudice against AOPA & AMROBA is allowed to continue... Dodgy

For those interested the following is a summary with a link provided for the minutes of the 1st ASAP meeting held on the 4th of September:
Quote:Aviation Safety Advisory Panel meeting - 4 September 2017

4 September 2017

The Aviation Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) held its inaugural meeting today, in Sydney.
Professor Pat Murray, independent Chair of the ASAP joined Shane Carmody, CASA’s Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety in welcoming the panel members, including representatives from industry and CASA.

Role of the ASAP and panel members

Members supported the role of the ASAP in providing the Director of Aviation Safety with informed, objective high-level advice from the aviation community on current, emerging and potential issues that have, or may have, significant implications for safety and the way CASA performs its functions.

Members agreed that the panel would consider issues from a whole-of-industry perspective rather than the specific interest of individual sectors.

Consultation and engagement

Members reinforced the need to streamline the consultation processes and recast engagement with industry.

The panel recommended that CASA close out the current structure of supporting committees to the former Standards Consultative Committee (SCC) and move quickly to seek expressions of interest from industry members interested in contributing to future engagement. The panel emphasised that the work of any supporting technical groups must be guided and tasked by the ASAP to ensure alignment with agreed strategies and priorities and that reporting procedures to the ASAP be developed.

Regulatory program priorities

The panel endorsed CASA’s drive to complete the regulatory reform program by December 2018 acknowledging the need to balance risk, simplicity and timeliness.

Guiding principles

The panel reviewed CASA’s guiding principles for development and implementation of safety regulations (as originally outlined in the DAS Directive issued in 2015) and agreed they formed a sound basis, but asked that they be refreshed with a view to stronger emphasis on:
  • risk analysis forming a fundamental tenet of assessing the approach to safety regulation
  • ensuring simplicity/clarity in the principles to effectively support the exercise of discretion
  • considering 'uniqueness’ of the Australian environment an exception rather than a default
  • recognising that timeliness is an important factor.
Immediate priorities

The panel supported a number priorities that needed quick resolution. These include:
  • medical certification standards for pilots
  • radio frequencies for use in low level uncontrolled airspace
  • validation of the principles underpinning planned reform of the flying operations regulations (Part 91, Part 119, Part 121, Part 133, Part 135, Part 138)
  • future policy directions to safely support growth in drones
  • concluding the outstanding actions from the aviation safety regulation review (ASRR).
The panel considered that the work of any supporting technical groups must be guided and tasked by the ASAP to ensure alignment with agreed strategies and priorities.

Next meeting

The ASAP will meet again on 22 November 2017.

Meeting minutes

ASAP meeting minutes, 4 September 2017

Last updated: 19 September 2017

MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
Something that perhaps should be added to the list of priorities P2.

Given the severe decline in general aviation activity and the massive drop in pilot and engineering numbers, should the review also include an audit of CAsA personnel with the view of culling unnecessary staff?

Reduce the cost burden of overstaffing and consideration could then be given to rescinding the temporary fuel excise which has been "temporary" for along time and cost the industry tens of millions.

Perhaps also streamlining the processes and costs of gaining an AOC, two years and hundreds of thousands of dollars for a certificate, which is essentially worthless as an asset given CAsA's ghost management of GA companies which requires their approval of management processes and staffing, would encourage more people to join the commercial side of GA.
In New Zealand an AOC can be gained in a couple of months costing tens of thousands not hundreds of thousands.
Reply
[Image: crisis.gif]


"The silence was deafening from Darren (OGAD) Chester??" - Dodgy

Dick Smith steps back into the fray today... Rolleyes

Via the Oz:

Quote:Dick Smith calls for aviation report to be released
[Image: af409de42af9d756cce574c32862d977?width=650]
Dick Smith: ‘The report has to be released urgently so you can start fixing the problem.”
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM September 22, 2017


Dick Smith is urging the release of a delayed landmark report into general aviation, saying it is important to arrest the decline in the sector.

The Australian has confirmed that the report by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics into general aviation is now expected to go to Transport Minister Darren Chester by the end of next month.

The report was commissioned last year by Mr Chester, who said it would “help get the public policy right to support growth in the sector”.

Mr Smith said: “The report has to be released urgently so you can start fixing the problem.”

He reiterated his fears for the sector. “General aviation is nearly destroyed in this country,” he said. “It is just the most terrible situation.”

The report was initially due to be completed by June 30, but Mr Chester’s office said BITRE was still finalising it.

“As BITRE has undertaken its work this year, it has become apparent that there is a need for more detailed data into the opportunities and threats facing the GA industry,” Mr Chester’s spokeswoman said.

The report by BITRE was commissioned after warnings that the sector had been hit by red tape and skyrocketing costs.

The Australian Aviation Associations Forum chairman Greg Russell said there had been a “lot of discussion” about the industry’s warnings about its decline and the BITRE study was important for getting hard numbers on the situation.

He said anecdotally some of his member organisations were warning the “industry continues to slide while we are waiting for this report to become available”.

“We’re looking for in the first instance the evidence to confirm what we think we know already, that the industry is declining,” he said. “Then we can start taking measures to correct what we think are the major problem areas. The reason this is important is the general aviation area traditionally has been the training ground for the airline pilots of tomorrow.”

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia executive director Benjamin Morgan said he was fed up waiting for ­action on the decline in the sector. “More businesses have closed, more people have left the industry,” he said. “What we need is the government to have a position on these things.”

He said the delay on the report was “turning up the volume on what is deafening silence” on the needs of the general aviation sector.
Meanwhile the miniscule is sounding more & more like a State Transport Minister and flapping his gums about...err rail...
Quote:Press Conference
Subject: Melbourne–Brisbane Inland Rail preferred alignment route (Yelarbon to Gowrie)
21 September
...bridges...
Quote:Bridge replacement completed south of Moranbah
A new $6 million bridge over Cherwell Creek, south of Moranbah, is now complete, improving flood immunity, productivity and driver safety.
...roads...
Quote:Central Queensland's Saraji Road set for $2.9 million upgrade
Nearly $3 million is being invested to ensure a key corridor between Dysart and Moranbah is upgraded to better connect communities and businesses in the region.
...rail...
Quote:Last Queensland Inland Rail preferred section selected
Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester today announced the preferred corridor for the Yelarbon and Gowrie section of the Inland Rail project, which will transform regional economies.
...rail...
Quote:Government on the hunt for fresh fast rail proposals
High-quality proposals are now being sought for the development of business cases to bring faster rail to Australian urban and regional areas.
 
...and FDS - you guessed it - road again...
Quote:Tenders called to deliver Midland Highway works
Tenders are now open to deliver the next two major projects under the Midland Highway 10 Year Action Plan, with the upgrades set to improve road safety and save lives.

In case you think I am making it up here is a link for the 6D OGAD Media Release page: http://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/ch...index.aspx


MTF...P2
Reply
(09-22-2017, 08:12 AM)Peetwo Wrote: [Image: crisis.gif]


"The silence was deafening from Darren (OGAD) Chester??" - Dodgy

Dick Smith steps back into the fray today... Rolleyes

Via the Oz:

Quote:Dick Smith calls for aviation report to be released
[Image: af409de42af9d756cce574c32862d977?width=650]
Dick Smith: ‘The report has to be released urgently so you can start fixing the problem.”
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM September 22, 2017


Dick Smith is urging the release of a delayed landmark report into general aviation, saying it is important to arrest the decline in the sector.

The Australian has confirmed that the report by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics into general aviation is now expected to go to Transport Minister Darren Chester by the end of next month.

The report was commissioned last year by Mr Chester, who said it would “help get the public policy right to support growth in the sector”.

Mr Smith said: “The report has to be released urgently so you can start fixing the problem.”

He reiterated his fears for the sector. “General aviation is nearly destroyed in this country,” he said. “It is just the most terrible situation.”

The report was initially due to be completed by June 30, but Mr Chester’s office said BITRE was still finalising it.

“As BITRE has undertaken its work this year, it has become apparent that there is a need for more detailed data into the opportunities and threats facing the GA industry,” Mr Chester’s spokeswoman said.

The report by BITRE was commissioned after warnings that the sector had been hit by red tape and skyrocketing costs.

The Australian Aviation Associations Forum chairman Greg Russell said there had been a “lot of discussion” about the industry’s warnings about its decline and the BITRE study was important for getting hard numbers on the situation.

He said anecdotally some of his member organisations were warning the “industry continues to slide while we are waiting for this report to become available”.

“We’re looking for in the first instance the evidence to confirm what we think we know already, that the industry is declining,” he said. “Then we can start taking measures to correct what we think are the major problem areas. The reason this is important is the general aviation area traditionally has been the training ground for the airline pilots of tomorrow.”

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia executive director Benjamin Morgan said he was fed up waiting for ­action on the decline in the sector. “More businesses have closed, more people have left the industry,” he said. “What we need is the government to have a position on these things.”

He said the delay on the report was “turning up the volume on what is deafening silence” on the needs of the general aviation sector.
Meanwhile the miniscule is sounding more & more like a State Transport Minister and flapping his gums about...err rail...
Quote:Press Conference
Subject: Melbourne–Brisbane Inland Rail preferred alignment route (Yelarbon to Gowrie)
21 September
...bridges...
Quote:Bridge replacement completed south of Moranbah
A new $6 million bridge over Cherwell Creek, south of Moranbah, is now complete, improving flood immunity, productivity and driver safety.
...roads...
Quote:Central Queensland's Saraji Road set for $2.9 million upgrade
Nearly $3 million is being invested to ensure a key corridor between Dysart and Moranbah is upgraded to better connect communities and businesses in the region.
...rail...
Quote:Last Queensland Inland Rail preferred section selected
Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester today announced the preferred corridor for the Yelarbon and Gowrie section of the Inland Rail project, which will transform regional economies.
...rail...
Quote:Government on the hunt for fresh fast rail proposals
High-quality proposals are now being sought for the development of business cases to bring faster rail to Australian urban and regional areas.
 
...and FDS - you guessed it - road again...
Quote:Tenders called to deliver Midland Highway works
Tenders are now open to deliver the next two major projects under the Midland Highway 10 Year Action Plan, with the upgrades set to improve road safety and save lives.

In case you think I am making it up here is a link for the 6D OGAD Media Release page: http://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/ch...index.aspx

Update: Phil & Sandy in response to Dick Smith Oz article... Wink :

Quote:Phil

Only restructuring CASA into an FAA styled CAA will improve things.
CASA exists almost solely for QANTAS and VIRGIN , everyone else just gets the scraps.

The entire CIvil Aviation Safety Regulation suite got re written to suit QANTAS and it has been the single greatest cause in the demise of General aviation in Australia.

The big boys in each part of the sector use CASA to crush startups and smaller competitors.

Eg regulation reform began in 1996 and there is still no Part 135 air taxi rules in Australia.

(Why ? Because the regional airlines thought it might cut into their margins and twisted CASAs arm not to implement them. )

Eg part 145 aircraft maintenance organisations have a rule structure so complex that they now need a minus of three admin staff by law (Safety, Qualiity, and Accountable manager) which is good if you are a one man operation. That much additional overhead is crushing even medium organisations.



Alexander

Adding to Phil, this Minister Chester should be Minister for Delay. At this he his a champion because he will do nothing without concerted political pressure.

There's been inquiry after inquiry and everyone knows what to do to save what should be a vibrant industry employing many thousands. There was a big General Aviation (GA) meeting in May last year in Tamworth which Chester and B Joyce attended. It is such rubbish to ask his own Dept Bureau of Transport Economics to provide yet another report.

Doesn't a Dept running on hundreds of millions pa know what's happening? Aircraft Owners & Pilots have shown conclusively, using government figures, that GA has collapsed due to the worst set of strict liability criminal rules for, in some cases, supposed wrongs that don't even rate a mention in the US. Couple these thousands of pages of unworkable rules with fee gouging for all sorts of unnecessary permissions and you begin to appreciate the enormity of the catastrophe.

But wait there's more, aviation specific medicals made so stringent, with no safety case, that thousands have simply given up, contrast the sensible US system.

$283 every two years for a special pilot aviation ID card, no years of service, age or qualifications makes any difference. Safety case? Why not attached to your licence? Why not some extensions? Why all this here but not required in the US?

Aircraft maintenance, again special Aussie bureaucrat rules designed to drive away apprentices and to push costs through the roof. GA flying hours dropped, low avgas fuel throughput and now much higher fuel costs and hundreds of refueling facilities decommissioned all over Australia.

The whole scene is truly a national disgrace and when politicians of any stripe talk jobs and growth, let alone a fair go, I feel ill. Alex in the Rises.


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
What we have:-






What we need:-






Spot the difference?
Reply
BITRE snubs GAAG fest  - Dodgy

Via Oz Flying:

Quote:[Image: bitre_report._web.jpg]The BITRE GA study report is expected to reveal the state of the general aviation industry in Australia. (Steve Hitchen)

BITRE GA Study Saga drags on
29 September 2017

The Bureau of Infrastructure Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) study into the state of the general aviation industry is now expected to be finalised and presented to Minister Darren Chester by the end of October.

The study, commissioned in October last year, was initially to have been finalised by 30 June, but that was later extended to 31 August to enable more stakeholders to contribute.

A spokesperson for the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD), which oversees BITRE, told Australian Flying on 1 September that the report was being finalised and was due to go to the General Aviation Advisory Group (GAAC) for review. However, no GAAG meeting was scheduled for the month.

Today, a DIRD spokesperson indicated that Minister Chester had been briefed on the status of the study and that GAAG would still have the opportunity to comment on the report before the final version was presented.

Australian Flying understands that much of the delay has been caused by dissatisfaction within GAAG over the way BITRE interpreted some of the data gathered.
According to sources close to the matter, BITRE briefed the GAAG back in July, but members considered the conclusions "did not reflect what GAAG members knew was reality" and that BITRE was asked to re-analyse the data.

Athough reports accused BITRE of "jumping to conclusions", the GAAG input was considered by others to be a constructive effort to help BITRE better understand the industry and the numbers.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...UW053g1.99


& also via the Oz today:

Quote:CASA threatens to get heavy on repeat offenders
[Image: 62de3159321af4d20365e5867449c5d1?width=650]Civil Aviation Safety Authority chief executive and ­director of aviation safety Shane Carmody. The nation’s aviation safety watchdog has moved to spell out how it will use safety information when making decisions about taking enforcement action, ­declaring it will strike when the rules are deliberately flouted.

But Civil Aviation Safety Authority chief executive and ­director of aviation safety Shane Carmody said ­action would be taken only when breaches of the aviation safety rules were “wilful, deliberate or reckless”; there was a pattern; or a failure to move to rectify deficiencies.

Mr Carmody said: “Our ­rational ‘just culture’ approach means that where honest errors or mistakes are made, CASA looks to support the efforts of individuals and organisations to make necessary improvements, correct identified problems and ensure safety risks are effectively managed in the process.

“Individuals and organisations with an understanding and commitment to safety need to take responsibility for addressing safety shortcomings and where they demonstrate the ability and willingness to do this, CASA needs not take action.”

CASA declared in 2015 that it would demonstrate a “just culture” approach.

This approach was one of the recommendations of the Forsyth review on aviation safety regulation, which said regulators in most jurisdictions had moved this way. The Forsyth review, which was released in 2014, had warned that the aviation industry “does not consider just culture principles are adequately applied in Australia and, as a result, is reluctant to disclose information to CASA”.

Under a “just culture” approach, pilots, engineers and others who report incidents are not normally pursued unless the ­action was wilful or grossly negligent.

Regional Aviation Association of Australia chief executive Mike Higgins said it was “critical” that aviation staff felt they could report safety occurrences without fearing being punished for genuine mistakes.

Last month, Mr Carmody issued a directive on limitations on the use of safety information that CASA gets from its normal surveillance and audit processes. This extended the approach beyond reporting programs where “just culture” normally applied.

The RAAA, whose members include Rex, Alliance Airlines and Sharp Airlines, backed the move to explain where safety information would be used to cancel or suspend a ­licence.

But the association said CASA needed to “refine” what it classified as unacceptable conduct, saying that getting counselling once in the past three years for similar conduct would not of itself comprise a wilful violation or gross negligence.

“The RAAA would like to work with CASA to better refine the boundaries of what is and is not acceptable conduct,” Mr Higgins said.

“Clear and fair boundaries will maintain a healthy culture of reporting that is so fundamental to safety management.”

Mr Carmody said CASA wanted to encourage a proactive ­approach to safety.

“Of course, if the safety rules are deliberately flouted or action is not taken to address safety issues, then CASA must and will take appropriate action,” he said.

Sandy in response:

Quote:Alexander

4 hours ago

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) won't have any credibility with our General Aviation (GA) industry unless there are real reforms to the regulatory regime and administrative processes which have caused massive losses in jobs and businesses, in contrast USA and NZ where GA is doing quite well.

Nearly 30 years ago a new model of governance was brought into being, that of the 'independent Commonwealth corporate body. In its first iteration CASA was touted as a Government Business Enterprise (GBE) but this term was dropped because as a monopoly with its 'use pays' fee gouging and never ending rewrite of the rules governing aviation it soon became obvious that to call it a business was about as fake as you can get. This model of governance has failed because it has far more incentive to maintain it's perks and huge salaries (CEO $600k) than to care for GA, and it has no political guidance.

Incredibly the Minister sends, on occasions, a Statement of Expectations which are always a bunch of motherhood statements looking suspiciously like they've been written by CASA itself.

GA is now a shadow of it's former self, Australian unique maintenance rules have grounded a large proportion of the GA fleet. Private pilots have quit in droves due to unreal CASA medical tests, hugely expensive aviation specific identity cards and an amazing suite of strict liability criminal sanction rules that legal experts (Harper et al) have declared as inappropriate. The rules rewrite was started 29 years ago, they've still not finished and never will because its such a great make work program.

Largely due to the latest batch of complex, convoluted and totally unnecessary rule changes for flying schools the remaining handful are disappearing rapidly. There used to be busy flying schools in numerous country towns, apart from a few ultralight schools, they've nearly all gone by way of the dodo.

What is not understandable is that there's been no public outcry, maybe as an industry it's been too small and it's gradual demise has not been spectacular.

One thing is certain, there's not been one Minister prepared to put the nation's interest before that of CASA and its 830 employees. Alex in the Rises.
MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
B is for? - BOLLOCKS & BUCKETS Dodgy  
AGAD opens 'safe skies are empty skies' stropathon - Blush

Yesterday in Can'tberra 6D delivered a speech that provides the perfect example of why Chester is Australia's Greatest Aviation Disaster and the antithesis of all that is bad in the puerile out of touch world of Federal politics: WARNING: Bucket will be required -  Confused

Quote:Safeskies Conference 2017
Speech
DCS012/2017
04 October 2017
National Convention Centre, Canberra

Australia continues to have one of the safest aviation industries in the world and this is testament to you, our aviation community and Government.

Aviation is critical for Australia connecting Australians domestically and across the world, directly contributing nearly $9.5 billion to the economy. As passenger demand increases and the industry grows I am committed to a prosperous future and am committed to ensuring we do so safely.

As passenger numbers increase so does Australia's investment in infrastructure. I commend Brisbane Airport on securing over $1.2 billion in private investment for the new runway scheduled to open in 2020. And in Victoria, Melbourne Airport is well advanced with planning for a third runway to meet forecast growth.

The Government is also investing with our once in a generation decision to deliver Western Sydney Airport at Badgerys Creek is a project that will generate thousands of jobs during construction and on-going employment in the airport itself and in the surrounding precinct.

It will benefit domestic travellers from the region and boost tourism opportunities. The Government has established the WSA Co with an investment of $5.3 billion in equity to build the airport.

The Government is also investing in our regions. Through the Remote Airstrip Upgrade Programme the Australian government has provided $23.4 million for 142 aerodrome upgrade projects to date and recently opened the applications for the next round of funding under this program.

Recently, I took my children to the Royal Flying Doctor Service Broken Hill base and it was a reminder of the importance of connectivity and the need to have safe and efficient links between regional and remote communities and our cities.

Aviation Safety Agencies

As our aviation industry grows it is important to maintain our focus on safety.
Since becoming the Minister responsible for aviation in Australia, I have issued our major aviation safety agencies with updated Ministerial strategic directions.

These Statements emphasise the priority given by the Government to safety, and for each agency to perform their vitally important roles in a way that will continue to deliver the best outcomes for the industry and the travelling public.

CASA's Statement of Expectations requires the Board to continue to regard the safety of air navigation, and in particular, the safety of passenger transport services, as CASA's most important consideration.

This will be achieved through a focus on regulatory activity that is pragmatic, practical and proportionate, while also being mindful of the economic and cost impact of this activity on individuals, businesses and the community.

However, it is not just CASA which is responsible for safety, I recognise that industry too are also setting higher than minimum safety standards to ensure the safety of its aircraft and passengers.

The Government has committed an additional $12 million over five years in this year's Budget to enhance the ATSB's core capabilities.

The ATSB will continue to give priority to transport safety investigations to inform how we can achieve the best safety outcomes for the travelling public.

Airservices operates as a world leading air traffic control and aviation rescue and firefighting service provider, backed by the requisite facilities and skilled workforce.

While acknowledging the efficiency, asset and project management benefits of the Airservices Accelerate Program, the Chair and CEO of Airservices have assured me that the Program will not affect the level of safety provided by front-line air traffic and aviation rescue and firefighting service staff.

Airservices, with Defence, is progressing the Onesky project with the aim to update our Air Traffic technology and in doing so it will be ready for increased activity and to do so more efficiently and safely.

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) plays in Australian aviation plays an increasingly important role in civil aviation policy and the industry.

Accordingly, this brings into focus the importance of the Aviation Policy Group (APG), chaired by the Secretary of my Department, and includes the Chief Executive Officers of CASA, Airservices and the RAAF as a forum to enhance cooperation and coordination on civil and military aviation-related issues and air traffic management planning.

I am pleased to see that there is an APG panel session on the Safeskies Conference program.

In mentioning APG, I would also like to acknowledge the outstanding work done by Mike Mrdak during his last eight years as Secretary of the Department.

I know many of you have had the pleasure of working with Mike, and under his professional leadership, the Department has helped deliver improvements in aviation safety that will have a lasting legacy across all sectors of the aviation industry.

I welcome Dr Steven Kennedy into his new role. I look forward to our ongoing work together.

Aviation Strategic Leaders Forum

The Government appreciates industry's wealth of knowledge and expertise and that by harnessing this, and working together with government agencies, we are able to take the industry forward.

With this in mind, I established the Aviation Strategic Leaders Forum to provide an opportunity for aviation leaders to discuss high-level strategic issues relevant to the industry and to provide advice directly to the Government.

In particular, the forum will help set future policy settings that will harness the potential to sustainably grow the aviation industry and ensure we maintain and wherever possible, improve the safety and security of the industry.

I had the opportunity to host the Forum's first meeting in August this year and was pleased by the positive and collaborative approach demonstrated by members, and I look forward to working with its members as we head into 2018.

General Aviation

The General Aviation industry in Australia has an important role to play, particularly in supporting regional and remote communities across the country.

I am passionate about opportunities in the GA sector and would like to ensure that if any person wants to be a pilot or a maintainer that they can do so in the GA sector.

I asked the Bureau of Infrastructure and Regional Economics (BITRE) to undertake a study of the General Aviation Industry. The study is examining the industry in Australia by outlining the challenges facing the GA industry and identifying opportunities to respond to those challenges.

I have established the General Aviation Advisory Group to act as an advisory body to me on matters in this sector.

This Group is a forum where industry representatives can identify opportunities to work collaboratively to respond to pressures facing the General Aviation sector.

Members come from a cross section of the diverse General Aviation sector including training, manufacturing, sport and recreation, rotorcraft and fixed wing aircraft, aerial application, remotely piloted aircraft systems and medical operations.

The Group is working on their strategic advice as input into the GA study and have come with a positive and constructive approach to tackling the issues facing GA.

I expect to release the GA study report before the end of the year.

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)

Also, by the end of this year CASA will have released its review of drone regulations.
Drones are a rapidly growing technology that have captured the imagination of many—from entrepreneurs to recreational users.

They have the potential to improve productivity, reduce costs and improve workplace safety across a range of industries and applications, such as agriculture, mining, search and rescue, fire and policing, aerial mapping and scientific research.

The Government is committed to fostering an environment that ensures the safety of drone operators and of other people and property, while facilitating the business opportunities for this sector.

CASA is currently reviewing the relevant aviation safety regulations. This review has given the wider community, as well as government agencies and industry, the opportunity to have input into consideration of future safety regulation of drones.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the review. There is a lot of work being progressed around the globe and Australia's regulation is at the forefront of this technology.

Aviation Security

Another area where there will be a focus on technology will be in aviation security. It is unfortunate that at a safety conference we have to talk about security, but the reality is that aviation remains an enduring and attractive terrorist target.

Providing the Australian public with safe and secure air travel is an Australian Government priority.

Following the recent disrupted plot, I asked the Inspector of Transport Security to review security settings at all 173 security regulated airports in Australia. I support our security being led by the advice of our security agencies and being proportionate and appropriate. Government and industry must work together to ensure the security of, and public confidence in, our transport systems.

Conclusion

Australia's aviation safety system is recognised internationally as one of the best in the world.

However, we cannot rest on our laurels and the Government and industry must continue work together to ensure we are able to deliver high standards of aviation safety while enhancing growth, efficiency and capacity.

As the Minister responsible for aviation in the Australian Government, I look forward to continuing to work with you to meet the challenges of a changing aviation environment and build opportunities for the future.

Thank you and enjoy the conference.
   
"Waiter bring me a bucket - pronto!!" Confused  

[Image: puke-Bucket.jpg]
Big Grin Big Grin

Now after such a vomitus work of fiction loaded with perfect pollywaffle motherhood statements and weasel word confections, you'd think our selfie and twitterverse King AGAD would've been pumping the flesh with all those aviation safety luminaries and splashing out with a twitter exposé - Rolleyes

Here is yesterday's tweeps from Minister 6D AGAD:

Quote:New @ANCAPsafety #roadsafety app launched to help consumers find safest car they can afford  @AAAcomms @ACRS_RoadSafety @NRMA @theracv
[Image: DLQmLXtUQAAczbU.jpg]
1:19 PM - 4 Oct 2017

Snowy River flats at Orbost: Good to be back in #lovegippsland @rharris334 @KathSully @kellazzaro @lyndalcurtis
[Image: DLR_CpsVoAAil_-.jpg]
7:38 PM - 4 Oct 2017
    
Once again 6D is happy to promote #roadsafety and then quickly (although by car - Huh ) scurry back to his electorate - UDB! Dodgy


MTF? Yawn - maybe Sleepy ...P2
Reply
"General Aviation

The General Aviation industry in Australia has an important role to play, particularly in supporting regional and remote communities across the country.

I am passionate about opportunities in the GA sector and would like to ensure that if any person wants to be a pilot or a maintainer that they can do so in the GA sector.

I asked the Bureau of Infrastructure and Regional Economics (BITRE) to undertake a study of the General Aviation Industry. The study is examining the industry in Australia by outlining the challenges facing the GA industry and identifying opportunities to respond to those challenges.

I have established the General Aviation Advisory Group to act as an advisory body to me on matters in this sector.

This Group is a forum where industry representatives can identify opportunities to work collaboratively to respond to pressures facing the General Aviation sector.


Members come from a cross section of the diverse General Aviation sector including training, manufacturing, sport and recreation, rotorcraft and fixed wing aircraft, aerial application, remotely piloted aircraft systems and medical operations.

The Group is working on their strategic advice as input into the GA study and have come with a positive and constructive approach to tackling the issues facing GA.

I expect to release the GA study report before the end of the year."


Whats General Aviation you coiffured clown?? It is almost non existent thanks largely to your inept and corrupt Safety Authority.

"Australia continues to have one of the safest aviation industries in the world and this is testament to you, our aviation community and Government."

Bollocks, Australia is far behind many first world countries.

A true statement I contend would be:

Australia continues to have one of the most expensive aviation industries in the world and this is testament to one of the most inept regulators in the world, supported by an equally disinterested and inept government.
Whats left of the aviation community has nothing to do with this situation.

"Australia's aviation safety system is recognised internationally as one of the best in the world."

Bollocks! recognised internationally as a complete and utter laughing stock.

This is the reason why Aviation is stuffed in Australia 6D, look it up in Wikipedia.

NOBLE CAUSE CORRUPTION
Noble cause corruption is corruption caused by the adherence to a teleological ethical system, suggesting that people will use unethical or illegal means to attain desirable goals, a result which appears to benefit the greater good. Where traditional corruption is defined by personal gain, noble cause corruptions[sic] forms when someone is convinced of their righteousness, and will do anything within their powers to achieve the desired result. An example of noble cause corruption is police misconduct "committed in the name of good ends" or neglect of due process through “a moral commitment to make the world a safer place to live."
Conditions for such corruption usually occur where individuals feel no administrative accountability, lack morale and leadership, and lose faith in the criminal justice system. These conditions can be compounded by arrogance and weak supervision.
Reply
(10-05-2017, 07:44 AM)Peetwo Wrote: B is for? - BOLLOCKS & BUCKETS Dodgy  
AGAD opens 'safe skies are empty skies' stropathon - Blush

Yesterday in Can'tberra 6D delivered a speech that provides the perfect example of why Chester is Australia's Greatest Aviation Disaster and the antithesis of all that is bad in the puerile out of touch world of Federal politics: WARNING: Bucket will be required -  Confused

Quote:Safeskies Conference 2017
Speech
DCS012/2017
04 October 2017
National Convention Centre, Canberra

Australia continues to have one of the safest aviation industries in the world and this is testament to you, our aviation community and Government.

Aviation is critical for Australia connecting Australians domestically and across the world, directly contributing nearly $9.5 billion to the economy. As passenger demand increases and the industry grows I am committed to a prosperous future and am committed to ensuring we do so safely.

As passenger numbers increase so does Australia's investment in infrastructure. I commend Brisbane Airport on securing over $1.2 billion in private investment for the new runway scheduled to open in 2020. And in Victoria, Melbourne Airport is well advanced with planning for a third runway to meet forecast growth.

The Government is also investing with our once in a generation decision to deliver Western Sydney Airport at Badgerys Creek is a project that will generate thousands of jobs during construction and on-going employment in the airport itself and in the surrounding precinct.

It will benefit domestic travellers from the region and boost tourism opportunities. The Government has established the WSA Co with an investment of $5.3 billion in equity to build the airport.

The Government is also investing in our regions. Through the Remote Airstrip Upgrade Programme the Australian government has provided $23.4 million for 142 aerodrome upgrade projects to date and recently opened the applications for the next round of funding under this program.

Recently, I took my children to the Royal Flying Doctor Service Broken Hill base and it was a reminder of the importance of connectivity and the need to have safe and efficient links between regional and remote communities and our cities.

Aviation Safety Agencies

As our aviation industry grows it is important to maintain our focus on safety.
Since becoming the Minister responsible for aviation in Australia, I have issued our major aviation safety agencies with updated Ministerial strategic directions.

These Statements emphasise the priority given by the Government to safety, and for each agency to perform their vitally important roles in a way that will continue to deliver the best outcomes for the industry and the travelling public.

CASA's Statement of Expectations requires the Board to continue to regard the safety of air navigation, and in particular, the safety of passenger transport services, as CASA's most important consideration.

This will be achieved through a focus on regulatory activity that is pragmatic, practical and proportionate, while also being mindful of the economic and cost impact of this activity on individuals, businesses and the community.

However, it is not just CASA which is responsible for safety, I recognise that industry too are also setting higher than minimum safety standards to ensure the safety of its aircraft and passengers.

The Government has committed an additional $12 million over five years in this year's Budget to enhance the ATSB's core capabilities.

The ATSB will continue to give priority to transport safety investigations to inform how we can achieve the best safety outcomes for the travelling public.

Airservices operates as a world leading air traffic control and aviation rescue and firefighting service provider, backed by the requisite facilities and skilled workforce.

While acknowledging the efficiency, asset and project management benefits of the Airservices Accelerate Program, the Chair and CEO of Airservices have assured me that the Program will not affect the level of safety provided by front-line air traffic and aviation rescue and firefighting service staff.

Airservices, with Defence, is progressing the Onesky project with the aim to update our Air Traffic technology and in doing so it will be ready for increased activity and to do so more efficiently and safely.

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) plays in Australian aviation plays an increasingly important role in civil aviation policy and the industry.

Accordingly, this brings into focus the importance of the Aviation Policy Group (APG), chaired by the Secretary of my Department, and includes the Chief Executive Officers of CASA, Airservices and the RAAF as a forum to enhance cooperation and coordination on civil and military aviation-related issues and air traffic management planning.

I am pleased to see that there is an APG panel session on the Safeskies Conference program.

In mentioning APG, I would also like to acknowledge the outstanding work done by Mike Mrdak during his last eight years as Secretary of the Department.

I know many of you have had the pleasure of working with Mike, and under his professional leadership, the Department has helped deliver improvements in aviation safety that will have a lasting legacy across all sectors of the aviation industry.

I welcome Dr Steven Kennedy into his new role. I look forward to our ongoing work together.

Aviation Strategic Leaders Forum

The Government appreciates industry's wealth of knowledge and expertise and that by harnessing this, and working together with government agencies, we are able to take the industry forward.

With this in mind, I established the Aviation Strategic Leaders Forum to provide an opportunity for aviation leaders to discuss high-level strategic issues relevant to the industry and to provide advice directly to the Government.

In particular, the forum will help set future policy settings that will harness the potential to sustainably grow the aviation industry and ensure we maintain and wherever possible, improve the safety and security of the industry.

I had the opportunity to host the Forum's first meeting in August this year and was pleased by the positive and collaborative approach demonstrated by members, and I look forward to working with its members as we head into 2018.

General Aviation

The General Aviation industry in Australia has an important role to play, particularly in supporting regional and remote communities across the country.

I am passionate about opportunities in the GA sector and would like to ensure that if any person wants to be a pilot or a maintainer that they can do so in the GA sector.

I asked the Bureau of Infrastructure and Regional Economics (BITRE) to undertake a study of the General Aviation Industry. The study is examining the industry in Australia by outlining the challenges facing the GA industry and identifying opportunities to respond to those challenges.

I have established the General Aviation Advisory Group to act as an advisory body to me on matters in this sector.

This Group is a forum where industry representatives can identify opportunities to work collaboratively to respond to pressures facing the General Aviation sector.

Members come from a cross section of the diverse General Aviation sector including training, manufacturing, sport and recreation, rotorcraft and fixed wing aircraft, aerial application, remotely piloted aircraft systems and medical operations.

The Group is working on their strategic advice as input into the GA study and have come with a positive and constructive approach to tackling the issues facing GA.

I expect to release the GA study report before the end of the year.

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)

Also, by the end of this year CASA will have released its review of drone regulations.
Drones are a rapidly growing technology that have captured the imagination of many—from entrepreneurs to recreational users.

They have the potential to improve productivity, reduce costs and improve workplace safety across a range of industries and applications, such as agriculture, mining, search and rescue, fire and policing, aerial mapping and scientific research.

The Government is committed to fostering an environment that ensures the safety of drone operators and of other people and property, while facilitating the business opportunities for this sector.

CASA is currently reviewing the relevant aviation safety regulations. This review has given the wider community, as well as government agencies and industry, the opportunity to have input into consideration of future safety regulation of drones.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the review. There is a lot of work being progressed around the globe and Australia's regulation is at the forefront of this technology.

Aviation Security

Another area where there will be a focus on technology will be in aviation security. It is unfortunate that at a safety conference we have to talk about security, but the reality is that aviation remains an enduring and attractive terrorist target.

Providing the Australian public with safe and secure air travel is an Australian Government priority.

Following the recent disrupted plot, I asked the Inspector of Transport Security to review security settings at all 173 security regulated airports in Australia. I support our security being led by the advice of our security agencies and being proportionate and appropriate. Government and industry must work together to ensure the security of, and public confidence in, our transport systems.

Conclusion

Australia's aviation safety system is recognised internationally as one of the best in the world.

However, we cannot rest on our laurels and the Government and industry must continue work together to ensure we are able to deliver high standards of aviation safety while enhancing growth, efficiency and capacity.

As the Minister responsible for aviation in the Australian Government, I look forward to continuing to work with you to meet the challenges of a changing aviation environment and build opportunities for the future.

Thank you and enjoy the conference.
   
"Waiter bring me a bucket - pronto!!" Confused  

[Image: puke-Bucket.jpg]
Big Grin Big Grin

Now after such a vomitus work of fiction loaded with perfect pollywaffle motherhood statements and weasel word confections, you'd think our selfie and twitterverse King AGAD would've been pumping the flesh with all those aviation safety luminaries and splashing out with a twitter exposé - Rolleyes

Here is yesterday's tweeps from Minister 6D AGAD:

Quote:New @ANCAPsafety #roadsafety app launched to help consumers find safest car they can afford  @AAAcomms @ACRS_RoadSafety @NRMA @theracv
[Image: DLQmLXtUQAAczbU.jpg]
1:19 PM - 4 Oct 2017

Snowy River flats at Orbost: Good to be back in #lovegippsland @rharris334 @KathSully @kellazzaro @lyndalcurtis
[Image: DLR_CpsVoAAil_-.jpg]
7:38 PM - 4 Oct 2017
    
Once again 6D is happy to promote #roadsafety and then quickly (although by car - Huh ) scurry back to his electorate - UDB! Dodgy


MTF? Yawn - maybe Sleepy ...P2

thornbird:
Quote:"..General Aviation


The General Aviation industry in Australia has an important role to play, particularly in supporting regional and remote communities across the country.

I am passionate about opportunities in the GA sector and would like to ensure that if any person wants to be a pilot or a maintainer that they can do so in the GA sector.

I asked the Bureau of Infrastructure and Regional Economics (BITRE) to undertake a study of the General Aviation Industry. The study is examining the industry in Australia by outlining the challenges facing the GA industry and identifying opportunities to respond to those challenges.

I have established the General Aviation Advisory Group to act as an advisory body to me on matters in this sector.

This Group is a forum where industry representatives can identify opportunities to work collaboratively to respond to pressures facing the General Aviation sector.

Members come from a cross section of the diverse General Aviation sector including training, manufacturing, sport and recreation, rotorcraft and fixed wing aircraft, aerial application, remotely piloted aircraft systems and medical operations.

The Group is working on their strategic advice as input into the GA study and have come with a positive and constructive approach to tackling the issues facing GA.

I expect to release the GA study report before the end of the year."

Whats General Aviation you coiffured clown?? It is almost non existent thanks largely to your inept and corrupt Safety Authority.

"Australia continues to have one of the safest aviation industries in the world and this is testament to you, our aviation community and Government."..."

Bollocks, Australia is far behind many first world countries a true statement I contend would be:

"...Australia continues to have one of the most expensive aviation industries in the world and this is testament to one of the most inept regulator in the world supported by an equally disinterested government. Whats left of the aviation community has nothing to do with this situation..."
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