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Shame or fame for Chester?
[Image: Untitled_Clipping_030417_022226_PM.jpg]
Week of buckets, bollocks & trough top ups - [Image: dodgy.gif]

From AGAD Chester's speech to the 'Safeskies are empty skies' talkfest - see above - the following was revealed by 6D:

..However, it is not just CASA which is responsible for safety, I recognise that industry too are also setting higher than minimum safety standards to ensure the safety of its aircraft and passengers.

The Government has committed an additional $12 million over five years in this year's Budget to enhance the ATSB's core capabilities.

The ATSB will continue to give priority to transport safety investigations to inform how we can achieve the best safety outcomes for the travelling public...
Yes a top up to the ATCB's (Australian top-cover bureau) ATP funded trough. I guess that means AGAD is happy with High Viz Hood's efforts so far... [Image: dodgy.gif]

Anyway in a show of appreciation, HVH again tries his hand at writing for the Oz... [Image: rolleyes.gif]  
Quote: Wrote:ATSB working hard on many levels to keep skies safe
  • Greg Hood
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM October 6, 2017
[url=http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/aviation/atsb-working-hard-on-many-levels-to-keep-skies-safe/news-story/52f18949f02ea8de73f0ca34f3e43f23#comments][/url]
Since my appointment on July 1, 2016 as chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, I have worked to maintain our status as a global leader in transport safety investigation. It is an absolute privilege to lead an organisation of highly skilled professionals dedicated to improving safety across the aviation, maritime and rail transport modes.

Over the past 12 months, the ATSB has undertaken a significant transformation designed to enable better resource allocation and utilisation across the agency. We have become more considered in how we allocate resources towards investigating accidents and serious incidents that have the greatest potential for safety learnings and enhancement.

Concurrently, we have expanded our capacity to improve transport safety outside of these traditional investigations, through safety issue investigations, greater interaction with operators and regulators, and amplified communications, education and promotion. The function of the ATSB is separate from transport regulators, policymakers and service providers, and our status as an independent safety investigator is vital to the integrity of our findings.

This is balanced carefully with our need to collaborate and network extensively with other agencies that share responsibility for transport safety, including public and private sector organisations and our international counterparts.

Yesterday in Canberra at the Safeskies aviation safety conference, I highlighted our collaboration with the Directorate of Defence Aviation and Air Force Safety. As the aviation safety investigator for the Australian Defence Force, the agency forms a crucial part of Australia’s national safety investigation capability.

I am particularly pleased that recent conversations between our two organisations have reaffirmed the importance of encouraging mutual assistance and the sharing of expertise, training opportunities, and equipment in relation to transport safety investigations.

While the federal budget provided a much-needed boost to the ATSB, allowing us to recommence recruitment following a self-imposed freeze, our need from our partnership with DDAAFS has shifted somewhat from boots-on-the-ground and technical expertise to logistical support in case of deployment to a major incident.

Over the past year, the ATSB has opened more than 150 investigations across aviation, maritime and rail. While not every investigation results in a deployment, those that do are often in remote locations. Our continued relationship with DDAAFS enables us to draw on their considerable resources and expertise in deployment. This is invaluable in facilitating an immediate response to incidents and accidents.

I am also proud to share the technical expertise of the ATSB with DDAAFS, including specialist expertise in materials failure analysis, cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder analysis, head-up display and maintenance tapes analysis, or the development of computer graphics in our state-of-the-art facilities in Canberra.

These capabilities are in demand across the Asia-Pacific. In the past year we have provided technical and developmental support to the National Transportation Safety Committee of Indonesia through the Indonesia Transport Safety Assistance Package and to the Transport Accident Investigation Commission of New Zealand.

We are constantly working to remain at the forefront of new technological developments and have also been engaged in ongoing discourse with DDAAFS and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority around our shared interest in the emerging technology of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, or drones.

The ATSB has been conducting research and data analysis into RPAS to assess the safety risk to aircraft. We have also been monitoring the potential benefits to safety investigations and have determined that advances in technology have made using RPAS to gather critical on-site data a viable option. We use RPAS to perform site mapping more quickly, with a high accuracy of measurement. We can now capture imagery that could previously only be obtained with a helicopter.

The ATSB also offers world-class training via secondments and sponsored training.
The strength of the ATSB is its people. Every day, our staff are investigating often tragic accidents to establish and then communicate the important safety messages to the aviation, maritime and rail transport industries to help ensure lives are not lost due to preventable transport safety occurrences.


[Image: puke-Bucket.jpg]



No comment, I can't get my head out of the bucket -  [Image: confused.gif]
Reply
Robbing Peter (industry) to give to Poor (industry) - Dodgy

Two days ago 'accelerate me' Harfwit was bragging about how, at the expense of 900 non-critical employees, he had turned around the fortunes of his GBE (government business enterprise) monopoly ASA... Confused

Via Oz Flying Wink :

Quote:[Image: jason-harfield-airservices-ceo_05029370-...AD441F.jpg]
Airservices Australia CEO Jason Harfield. (Airservices Australia)

Harfield credits Accelerate for Airservices Performance
18 October 2017

Airservices Australia CEO Jason Harfield has credited the Accelerate Program with improving the organisation's performance, enabling it to report a $59 million profit for the 2016-17 financial year.

The profit result was contained in the Airservices Australia Annual Report distributed today.

The controversial Accelerate Program changed the structure of Airservices Australia and resulted in 900 redundancies.

“The results speak for themselves," Harfield said. "In just 18 months we have transitioned to a far more customer-focused organisation with a strong foundation for our role in managing the safety of Australian skies.

“In making the difficult decisions and investing the time and resources it demanded, Airservices has become a stronger, more agile and efficient organisation.”

The program saved Airservices $177 million in 2016-17 and returned the organisation into the black. Operating costs for the year have been reported at 15% lower than the previous year.

"The 2016–17 year was a period of intense and accelerated change, designed to lay these important foundations for us to discharge our purpose successfully and sustainably over the longer term," said Airservices Chairman Sir Angus Houston. "The outcomes achieved have positioned Airservices extremely well for the future.

"The business is in excellent shape, our operational safety performance remains outstanding, and we are far better prepared to deliver future services safely and efficiently."

After the Accelerate program, Airservices now employs a total of 3711 people, of which 1037 are Air Traffic Controllers and a further 877 Aviation Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) personnel.

According to Harfileld, Airservices' major focus for the year was preparing for the launch of OneSKY, the combined civil and military air traffic control system. Airservices also signed a contract for the CMATS Voice Communication System (VCS) Phase One.

“The VCS Phase One is a key milestone for delivery of OneSKY which will create a more resilient, sustainable and efficient communications system in the short term and enable more benefits to be realised with the delivery of OneSKY,” Harfield said.

“With the foundations laid during 2016-17, Airservices is in great shape to take on the challenges ahead, to evolve our business and processes to adapt to changing customer needs, and to continue playing a key role in keeping our skies safe.”

The full 2016-17 annual report is on the Airservices Australia website.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...EoWwYY3.99

On the same day Oz Aviation put out the following:  
   
Quote:Australian Airports Association calls for funding boost for regional airports
October 18, 2017 by australianaviation.com.au 1 Comment
[Image: 9992.jpg]A file image of an RFDS aircraft taking off from an unpaved runway. (RFDS)

The Australian Airports Association (AAA) is calling for a broadening of government support to fund improvements to regional airstrips to the tune of $160 million over the next four years.

The AAA on Wednesday launched its “Protect Regional Airports” campaign in partnership with the Australian Logistics Council, Regional Aviation Association of Australia (RAAA) and Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS).

As part of the campaign, the group is calling for the Regional Aviation Access Programme (RAAP) to be extended for a further four years, as well as the establishment of a new program to broaden the number of remote and regional airstrips eligible for government support.

Under the AAA proposal, the RAAP would be extended at $15 million a year for the next four years, while the proposed new airport grants program would fund regional airports (and not just remote airstrips) with $25 million a year for four years.

The AAA has called for the Commonwealth to contribute half the money while state and local governments to contribute the other half, with the funds used to address local challenges such as the lack of lighting, runway improvements and more essential animal fencing.

“However, we would like to see that all applicants need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis, to allow for special provisions where an equal contribution arrangement may not be possible, particularly in very remote areas,” AAA chief executive Caroline Wilkie said in a statement.

“To continue being a successful and prosperous nation, the back bone of Australia, the regions, need equitable access to markets, health care, exports and produce all of which are facilitated by regional airports.”

The AAA’s Regional Airport Infrastructure Study found regional airports faced a significant funding shortfall in the years ahead to maintain existing facilities and upgrade their airfields to cope with the expected growth in the sector.

The study, conducted by ACIL Allen Consulting and published in September 2016, estimated regional airports with fewer than 500,000 passengers movements a year spent $185 million in 2014/15 to maintain and improve operations.

However, expenditures for regional airports were expected to rise by 38 per cent over the next decade, putting even more pressure on already stretched budgets, with 61 per cent of the nation’s regional airports running budget deficits in 2014/15.

Further, some 40 per cent of regional airports expected to have persistent budget deficits over the next 10 years.

“We know that many of these airports are doing it tough,” Wilkie said.

The RAAP is a government scheme that offers funding for upgrades to remote aerodromes (the Remote Access Upgrade Program, or RAU), inspection and related services at aerodromes in remote indigenous communities (Remote Aerodrome Inspections, or RAI), and subsidised flights to remote communities (the Remote Air Services Subsidy Scheme, or RASS).

The 2015/16 federal budget allocated $33.7 million to be spent over four years towards grants to regional airports for safety and access upgrades. The funding was generally provided on a matching co-funding basis with applicants.

Applications for the final round of remote airstrip upgrade funding closes on Friday, October 20.

RFDS chief executive Martin Laverty said the remote access upgrade program was an essential part of delivering healthcare in the bush.

ALC chief executive Michael Kilgariff said the council was proud to support efforts to secure greater investment and funding support for a safe and sustainable regional airport network.

RAAA chief executive Mike Higgins said “serviceable runways are essential, particularly in rural and remote locations beyond the range of EMS helicopters”.
 
"..enabling it to report a $59 million profit for the 2016-17 financial year..."

There you go 'Malcolm in the middle' and 6D AGAD put our money where your mouth is and show government support for the essential infrastructure of regional airports; 59 million would a go a long way to helping keep our regional airports open and viable... Wink


MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
Chester 'AGAD' - The word perfect doublespeak Muppet Dodgy

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If nothing else our 'AGAD' miniscule for 'non-Aviation', train sets & State roads; has word weasel confectionary, political doublespeak and obfuscation down to the finest of arts... Dodgy

Is it any wonder he remains on the frontbench of a useless 'do nothing' Malcolm Turdball led Government... Undecided  

Here was 'AGAD' Chester two days ago acknowledging that the KL government was dumping the Australian aborted (ATSB led & topcovered) MH370 search effort; in favour of the US company Ocean Infinity's 'no cure, no fee' continued search offer:

Quote:Statement
Media Release
DC315/2017
19 October 2017


I acknowledge the announcement that the Malaysian Government is entering into an agreement with Ocean Infinity, to search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

The Malaysian Government has accepted an offer from Ocean Infinity to search for the missing plane, entering into a ‘no find no fee’ arrangement.

Malaysia's decision to proceed with the search shows the commitment to find MH370.
While I am hopeful of a successful search, I'm conscious of not raising hopes for the loved ones of those on board.

Ocean Infinity will focus on searching the seafloor in an area that has previously been identified by experts as the next most likely location to find MH370.

Australia, at Malaysia's request, will provide technical assistance to the Malaysian Government and Ocean Infinity.

No new information has been discovered to determine the specific location of the aircraft, however data collected during the previous search will be provided.

As always our thoughts are with the families and friends. I hope that this new search will bring answers, both for the next of kin and for the rest of the world.

Yesterday 6D AGAD, in a joint doorstop media statement with Julie Bishop, almost perfectly rehashed that very same totally bollocks statement... Dodgy

Quote:JOURNALIST:             Just on other issues of the day, we’ve obviously reignited the search for MH 370. That’s gone out to a new process now. Obviously family members need to be contacted about that. Is that a move that you would welcome?
DARREN CHESTER:   Well, first of all can I say that obviously the thoughts and prayers of the Australian Government are with the families and friends of the 239 people who are missing on board MH 370 throughout what has been a very harrowing three and a half years now. We have been involved with the Chinese Government and the Malaysian Government in the search for MH-370. As you are well aware, the search was suspended earlier this year after we completed about 120,000 square kilometres in the Southern Indian Ocean.
I welcome the news that is coming out of Malaysia today, that the Malaysian Government’s had some discussions with Ocean Infinity around a further search effort. The Australian Government’s indicated that we will provide some technical support, some analytical support. We have some of the world’s leading experts in terms of this type of work and we have a great deal of experience garnered over the last three years, so we’ll certainly be looking to provide that level of technical support. But this is an agreement that the Malaysian Government has reached with a private company and I’m not aware of any further details.
JOURNALIST:             Given though that we haven’t had any luck recovering it thus far, do you have much confidence though that the search will actually reap anything, or anything will come from that?
DARREN CHESTER:   Well, I am not in the business of raising false hopes for the loved ones of those missing on board MH-370, but we supported the search effort over the last three years. I can say that we searched in the order of 120,000 square kilometres. Keep in mind this has been the biggest search in aviation history, covering some of the most difficult terrain in the world. We are talking ocean depths of 4 kilometres to 6 kilometres. It has been, in many senses, right at the edge of technology and human endeavour.
So the search effort up until earlier this year, coordinated by Malaysia, Australia, and China, was one of extraordinary proportions. Given the Malaysian Government is now seeking to reach an agreement with Ocean Infinity; I certainly wish them all the best. I wish them safe seas as they go about what is a difficult task, but it wouldn’t be responsible of me to raise any false hope. I wish them well.

The following comments off this PT blog piece yesterday - Malaysia will focus renewed MH370 search where Australia refused to look - highlights how transparent the pollywaffle of our mendacious miniscule AGAD truly is:
Quote:Ben S: However late last year the Minister for Infrastructure,  Darren Chester, said any resumption of the search required precise identification of the final resting place of the wreckage. When Mr Chester acknowledged Malaysia’s decision to accept the Ocean Infinity offer at a media door stop this morning, and said it was important not to raise false hopes for the next of kin.


Mick Gilbert


October 20, 2017 at 11:27 am

Our Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester’s previous announcement that, “… [i]we will be suspending the search unless credible evidence is available that identifies the specific location of the aircraft.[/i]”, in other words, we’ll start looking for it again as soon as someone finds it, was one of the great pieces of dissembling political double-talk...

Comet
October 20, 2017 at 12:45 pm

Mr Chester: “We’ll only resume the search for MH370 after we know its precise location.”

Wouldn’t that be a waste of taxpayer’s money to search for something when you already have a precise location?

Maybe he means he’ll launch the search after Ocean Infinity has found it.


Tango
October 20, 2017 at 12:52 pm

What it is, is tacit reco0gniationa of , we got into something that is an endless money pit and we need a way out.

Pouring good money after already pissed away good money is fine if its not our money.


Mick Gilbert
October 20, 2017 at 2:13 pm

That quote from Chester is from December last year when he was prefacing the suspension of the underwater search in January 2017. It was just double-talk to justify the use of the phrase “[i]suspending the search[/i]” rather than “[i]terminating the search[/i]“. He was basically saying that they were absolutely committed to not looking for it until it was found.
 
Couple that with the equally diabolical track record of the ATSB in the ongoing PelAir re-coverup investigation, now being led by the seriously flawed and conflicted High Viz 'precious' Hoody,... Confused

Quote:Bloody amazing-

...The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) was still tainted by its shoddy investigation into another aviation disaster in which a Pel-Air WestWind air ambulance was forced to ditch near Norfolk Island in 2009, having found itself unable to land in bad weather and with insufficient fuel to divert. The two and a half year investigation by the ATSB prompted a national scandal when a television documentary aired allegations of misconduct by the ATSB. A subsequent Senate inquiry found the ATSB’s accident report was deeply flawed and had unfairly blamed the pilot...

&..

The PC war game - and how to play it

...Hoody's sensitive crew having a ‘sook’ about the public mention of a lightweight ‘novel’ like W&P which runs to 1440 pages seems a little petulant, when you consider the Pel-Air report is about one third the size. At least Tolstoy refrained from gilding the Lilly, did work from factual data and did little harm to man nor beast.

“Having explained the nature of the incident I was advised not to make my explanation into "War and Peace" (1st. ed. 1225 pages by L. Tolstoy).

"If the advice had been given in a light hearted or joking manner then maybe think nothing of it. But no, it was given in a condescending tone in order to display superiority and the classical learning of this clever person compared to an ignorant peasant pilot.”

The Hi Viz response is a classic; the way he redefines the ‘War and Peace’ slight into being a helpful, touchy-feely, warm and fuzzy placebo for a disparaging remark is ‘delightful’...

[Image: tenor.gif?itemid=4732834]

...and even the average punter begins to get an appreciation of why it is the PAIN/IOS BRB overwhelmingly voted for Chester as Australia's Greatest Aviation Disaster... Dodgy


MTF...P2 Tongue


Ps One more example of just how perfectly the AGAD Muppet trots out the bureaucratic motherhood statements and weasel words - from the start of yesterday's media doorstop... Rolleyes :

Quote: [b]DARREN CHESTER:   [/b]First of all can I say it is great to be here with Julie Bishop, the Minister for Foreign Affairs, and also to be part of this extraordinary delivery of the Dreamliner here from Qantas today. It is a breakthrough aircraft for this iconic Australian airline and we are certainly looking forward to continuing to see growth in Qantas, growth in the visitor economy, and we will see Qantas go from strength to strength.

We have a rich and proud history in aviation here in Australia, but we also have a great future. It’s ministers like Julie Bishop working around the world, the Turnbull-Joyce Government working to secure open skies agreements, working with Minister Steve Ciobo in terms of boosting our tourism industry. It’s a constant effort by the Government to create and secure more jobs in the Australian economy, and we’re looking forward to working with Qantas and other people involved in the tourism industry to see further growth into the future.
 
UDB! What did the industry ever do to deserve such a tosser and ATP funded WOFTAM - Huh
Reply
[Image: Open-Mouth-Insert-Foot-Funny-Mouth-Meme-Photo.jpg]

Chester swaps feet - Big Grin

[Image: Untitled_Clipping_091017_095355_AM.jpg]

(10-21-2017, 10:35 AM)Peetwo Wrote: Chester 'AGAD' - The word perfect doublespeak Muppet Dodgy

[Image: ddfd8850aeb1e3c66a68288c990e0198.jpg]

If nothing else our 'AGAD' miniscule for 'non-Aviation', train sets & State roads; has word weasel confectionary, political doublespeak and obfuscation down to the finest of arts... Dodgy

Is it any wonder he remains on the frontbench of a useless 'do nothing' Malcolm Turdball led Government... Undecided  

Here was 'AGAD' Chester two days ago acknowledging that the KL government was dumping the Australian aborted (ATSB led & topcovered) MH370 search effort; in favour of the US company Ocean Infinity's 'no cure, no fee' continued search offer:

Quote:Statement
Media Release
DC315/2017
19 October 2017


I acknowledge the announcement that the Malaysian Government is entering into an agreement with Ocean Infinity, to search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

The Malaysian Government has accepted an offer from Ocean Infinity to search for the missing plane, entering into a ‘no find no fee’ arrangement.

Malaysia's decision to proceed with the search shows the commitment to find MH370.
While I am hopeful of a successful search, I'm conscious of not raising hopes for the loved ones of those on board.

Ocean Infinity will focus on searching the seafloor in an area that has previously been identified by experts as the next most likely location to find MH370.

Australia, at Malaysia's request, will provide technical assistance to the Malaysian Government and Ocean Infinity.

No new information has been discovered to determine the specific location of the aircraft, however data collected during the previous search will be provided.

As always our thoughts are with the families and friends. I hope that this new search will bring answers, both for the next of kin and for the rest of the world.

Quotes from CNN article: US company says it's close to agreeing deal to restart MH370 search

Quote:(CNN) US marine exploration company Ocean Infinity says it's made "good progress" on a deal to restart the search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight 370, but the contract hasn't been finalized.

The statement contradicts an earlier claim from Australia's transport minister that the company had entered into a "no find no fee" arrangement with the Malaysian government....

...In an earlier statement - sic - (see above), Darren Chester, Australia's Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, said the Malaysian government had "accepted an offer from Ocean Infinity to search for the missing plane."


"Malaysia's decision to proceed with the search shows the commitment to find MH370," the statement said...

...The governments didn't rule out a future resumption of the search if "credible new information" came to light.

However, in his statement Friday, Chester said no new information had since emerged....
Huh

Oh Dear Darren - Confused



[Image: 955c6925c35d9563262bb329d1f5597d--funny-...arcasm.jpg]



MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
Oh Dear, Dear, Dear, dopey, dumb, dazzling, dickhead, Darren - Big Grin  

Via the Oz today:

Quote:Random airport ground staff checks ‘a joke’
[Image: 02c331f3c797b530139c945da6e2eb1f?width=650]
Transport Minister Darren Chester at Parliament House in Canberra.
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM October 23, 2017
  • [size=undefined]STEFANIE BALOGH
    [Image: stefanie_balogh.png]
    National Education Correspondent
    Canberra

    @stefaniebalogh
    [img=0x0]https://i1.wp.com/pixel.tcog.cp1.news.com.au/track/component/author/4467ddaa85f7dca1b49cb9241b5edc84/?esi=true&t_product=the-australian&t_template=s3/austemp-article_common/vertical/author/widget&td_bio=false[/img]
    [/size]

Behind-the-scenes airport workers such as baggage handlers, caterers, engineers and maintenance staff will undergo heightened random security checks, including screening for traces of explosives, as the federal government cracks down on potential “insider threats’’.

Transport Minister Darren Chester said the new measures, announced at the weekend, would strengthen controls to ensure airport workers were authorised, properly identified and appropriately trained before entering secure airside areas.

But independent senator Nick Xenophon derided it as a “joke’’ because the additional screening would involve only random checks of workers accessing secure areas. “Systems of checking can be easily bypassed. People with evil intent can be tipped off by mates and avoid random screening,’’ Senator Xenophon said.

Transport Workers Union acting national secretary ­Michael Kaine said the measures did not go far enough.

“Extra checks on staff are piecemeal, amounting to little more than window-dressing. It is also regrettable that the government did not consult with airport workers and the TWU before announcing these measures,’’ he said.

“We have been flagging for several years the problem of high turnover rates, which means hundreds of workers are on a daily basis accessing secure areas of our airports without proper checks or security clearance.’’
The tightening of security measures at major domestic airports follows the last-minute discovery of an alleged sophisticated plot to smuggle a military-grade explosive device onto an international flight from Sydney to Abu Dhabi in July.

“Airport workers, together with their vehicles and belongings, will be randomly selected for explosive-trace detection testing and other screening when entering or working in secure airside areas at major airports,” Mr Chester said.

Senator Xenophon said most Australians would be shocked to find that while passengers and ­pilots are screened on their way into secure areas, baggage handlers, catering and ground staff with Aviation Security Identification Cards were not. “If it is good enough for pilots and passengers, it should be good enough for everyone,’’ he said. “In countries like the US, all airport staff are required to be screened. Our government’s approach to random inspections is a joke.’’
No comment required me'thinks - Wink
Reply
6D AGAD continued bollocks on Airport security & BJ succession plans - Dodgy

Via Minister AGAD's media webpage:

Quote:Sky News
Interview
DCI088/2017
23 October 2017
Subject: Airport security, citizenship

Samantha Maiden: Transport Minister, Darren Chester, has rolled out a range of new security measures for airports. They are taking some heat from critics. Welcome to the program, Darren.
Darren Chester: Good morning, Sam.
Samantha Maiden: So, critics have suggested that you are essentially arguing there should be a higher standard for some staff at airports and not others. Why is that?
Darren Chester: Well, the situation is we take advice from our transport security experts and obviously intelligence agencies, both here and abroad, and the International Civilian Aviation Organisation has an expectation that you will have random explosive trace detection as well as an unpredictable system of checking on the people who have access to secure areas. So we are talking about 140,000 people have access to secure areas. They have an Aviation Security Identification Card, they need background checks to get that card. Having secured that ASIC card, there’ll be additional checks now in terms of their daily working patterns, where they’ll be exposed to those random explosive trace detection, additional training for other aviation workers to make sure they’re vigilant around potential threats that might occur in the airport setting, and working to make sure that we’ve got the settings right to keep the Australian travelling public safe.
Samantha Maiden: You must hear a lot of things in your portfolio. Is there anything that you have heard in recent weeks or months leading up to making these changes that shocked or horrified you, in terms of what the security standards were?
Darren Chester: No, look I took advice from our experts in transport security. Now, we put some legislation through the House in March this year, which led up to these regulations coming into effect last week. So now we’re working with the nine major airports, the airports which are seeing a very rapid increase in passenger numbers from now out until 2030. We are seeing huge numbers in terms of increases of passengers, which is good, which is good for the aviation sector but it presents a challenge. You’ve got to manage the security risks. So, the changes that we made were all about making sure that we can keep that secure area of the airport as safe as it possibly can be, and we are taking the advice of the experts in that regard.
Samantha Maiden: This alleged plot that we recently heard a lot about in relation to aircraft; was there any lessons to be learned from that? There was one claim that there was an attempt to put a bomb on a plane that was essentially abandoned because the suitcase was too heavy. Was there anything about the allegations that have been raised in that case that made you think that more needed to be done?
Darren Chester: The Prime Minister himself said: this is an area of public policy where you can never just set and forget. So we are constantly reviewing the security settings right throughout the community. But in the aviation space and the transport space, we are working all the time to make sure we’re keeping up with any new or emerging threats. Now, there is no question the alleged plot in Sydney raised our level of concern to the point where we had additional scanning implemented at the airports immediately, and now, even though that plot has been averted, we have got a higher level than we had in the past. So while it’s down from that extreme level, I guess, and the immediate aftermath of that plot becoming public, there’s still a higher level now. So some of the things people actually notice themselves, they go through the airport, there’s more explosive trace detection scanning of passengers, but there’s other things they won’t notice because it happens behind closed doors and there’s a lot of measures in place which we can’t really talk about, in terms of publicly. We don’t want to tell the people who seek to do us harm exactly what we’re up to. But there’s a lot of things happening, both publicly and behind closed doors, which are all aimed at keeping the travelling public safe and keeping airport workers safe.
Samantha Maiden: What about this issue of photo ID? Why do you think people should continue to be able to get on domestic flights without showing any?
Darren Chester: Well, it is a conversation that’s occurring within security agencies right now, and it’s occurring publicly as well. The point to remember though, when we’re scanning people getting on board an aircraft, we’re most concerned about what they’re carrying or what’s in their bag. Their actual identification, who they are, isn’t as important from an aviation security perspective as what they may be carrying. So we need to have the debate, we need to have the discussion about whether we’re ready to move towards producing a photo ID for every domestic flight, but we have a bit of a problem in Australia that we have different licensing systems in each state. So there’s no one single photo card that’s linked up in a database that would immediately be available to the police and law enforcement activities. But it’s a debate that we need to have, and I’m happy to participate in that, but from a straight out aviation security setting, our focus is on making sure that people don’t get on board planes with things that can do harm to others.
Samantha Maiden: Okay, let’s get to the Nationals. There was a lot of chatter last week that the Nationals were not impressed, that there was some announcements in terms of funding, particularly in the lead up to the Queensland election, that the One Nation Party was involved in. Have you taken any concerns to the leadership, to the Liberal Party, that this doesn’t happen again?
Darren Chester: Well, I have many conversations with my colleagues within Cabinet, and most of them stay private for that reason. We had a conversation on policy areas, on issues of concern, and the important thing is that they do stay private. So yes, I have had conversations with colleagues about how we manage our portfolios in the lead up to state elections, and in the lead up to the Federal election. We have a good, strong working relationship, we have got a great team, I think Prime Minister Turnbull’s doing a good job…
Samantha Maiden: Why would One Nation be involved though, in that sort of…
Darren Chester: Well I wasn’t part of those conversations, I’m simply saying that I think we’ve got a good, strong Cabinet team and the Prime Minister’s doing a great job in terms of leading that team and Barnaby Joyce, my leader, is doing a great job of standing up for regional areas.
It is something that I’m obviously very passionate about and it’s good to have Barnaby at the forefront of our team.
Samantha Maiden: There have been also reports in the last week, though, that Barnaby Joyce has plans in place to essentially have a succession plan if he needs to take time out to fight a by-election in the wake of that High Court result. Is it the case that there’s a secret plan to install Nigel Scullion—the fisherman at large, the man who once posed in an avocado calendar—as the leader of the National Party?
Darren Chester: Well, it’s not much of a secret plan. I read that plan in the newspapers, so I’m not sure how secret it is. It’s…
Samantha Maiden: Is it a….
Darren Chester: Well, it’s speculation. I mean Barnaby’s in a position obviously his citizenship issue is before the High Court. I’d love to see that resolved as soon as possible in a positive way. He is a very important part of our team.
Samantha Maiden: Sure, but is Nigel Scullion the candidate if he has to step aside? Is it Nigel Scullion Deputy Prime Minister? I really like the idea, I’ve got to say, probably for all the wrong reasons.
Darren Chester: Well, look, Nigel’s a great mate of mine and Barnaby’s a great mate of mine and I’m not going to speculate on what may or may not happen. I mean the High Court ruling comes down, we hope to get a positive result and then Barnaby continues doing this great job of leading our team. If he doesn’t get a positive result, obviously we’re off to a bi-election and my team—the National Party team, of which there’s 22 of us—will have to resolve our leadership issues then. But…
Samantha Maiden: Okay, but would it be an interim situation? Like, would Nigel just step into the job with the expectation that Barnaby would…
Darren Chester: Look, we are going a long way down a path of hypotheticals, but the fundamental point to remember is Barnaby has enormous support amongst the National Party. If it was that he had to fight a bi-election, we would all be out there en masse fighting for him and fighting with him, and Barnaby would be expected to continue as leader in the longer term. So, whatever happened in the short term, it would be a matter for the party-room to decide. But be under no illusions, Barnaby has great support amongst our team. He has been a terrific leader for the National Party and we are going from strength to strength.
Samantha Maiden: Yeah, and serious issue then, on that. Over the weekend, headlines suggesting that Barnaby Joyce was facing some sort of unspecified personal crisis. Have you seen any evidence that this has been affecting his work, the operations of his office, actually affecting his ability to do his job? He is obviously under a lot of pressure with the High Court and so on. Have you seen any evidence that he is struggling with the job?
Darren Chester: Barnaby is doing a fantastic job as the leader of our party. He is well supported by the whole team. I don’t think there’s been a leader in the National Party in recent history who has been able to raise the profile of our team to such an extent that Barnaby has and been able to deliver everything we promised we would deliver to the Australian people. So, classic example…
Samantha Maiden: Do you think that article was appropriate then? Do you think that the media shouldn’t report on that?
Darren Chester: I’ll get to your point. Just on that Melbourne Brisbane Inland Rail. We have talked about it for decades and Barnaby’s been the leader who’s been able to secure that in coalition with Malcolm Turnbull. Now in terms of the article itself, I think it reflects more poorly on the journalist themselves than anyone else. That journalist will need to decide, are you a gossip columnist or are you a genuine member of the press gallery?
Samantha Maiden: But is it gossip only if it’s not affecting his job? Like you think that this should be off limits essentially.
Darren Chester: Well, I’m sitting here as a Cabinet Minister responsible for $10 billion worth of infrastructure spending this financial year. You could be asking me about projects in all the capital cities, about the Bruce Highway, the Pacific Highway, Inland Rail—they are the things that I’m responsible and they’re the things that people care about. A bit of gossip in a newspaper is something that is beneath commenting on and the journalist involved needs to reflect on whether that is a good way to shape your own career.
Samantha Maiden: Thank you very much for your time today, Darren Chester, we appreciate it.
Darren Chester: Thank you.
 
&..
Quote:Radio National Breakfast
Interview
DCI087/2017
23 October 2017
Subject: Airport security

Fran Kelly: The Federal Transport Minister Darren Chester joins us in our Parliament House studios. Minister, welcome back to Breakfast.
Darren Chester: Good morning, Fran.
Fran Kelly: Well, it doesn’t make sense, does it? Why are random security checks of airport staff to find traces of explosives good enough, when crew have to go through compulsory tests like all passengers?
Darren Chester: Well, Fran, with all due respect to Nick Xenophon, I have got the choice here between taking advice from people who are experts in transport security, people who consult with intelligence agencies, or a career politician. Now, I don’t make any apologies for the fact that I have taken advice of the experts and gone forward with the proposal they have put to me around checks—which are both random and unpredictable—and which are aimed at those airside workers, people who have access to the secured area, so people who have an ASIC card, an aviation security identification card, of which there are about 140,000 in Australia at the moment. So I’ve gone with the experts’ advice, and in accordance with the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s requirements as well around checks, which are both random and unpredictable targeting explosive trace detection.
Fran Kelly: Well, the pilots are saying the same thing. I mean, why are flight crews deemed a bigger risk than ground crew?
Darren Chester: Well, the point I’m making for you, Fran, is that the advice we have received is: you take consideration of the transport security settings, if you take advice from the intelligence agencies, both here in Australia and abroad, and the issue we are trying to deal with is around the so-called insider threat, that being a trusted person who may have access to aircraft. Now, what we are doing is implementing random explosive trace detection testing. Also, in addition to that there’s additional security training for all staff at airports, so they are in a position to be aware of their circumstances, be aware of their surroundings, and perhaps report anything they’re not comfortable with. In addition to that, more screening in terms of during the person actually entering the workforce, but also random checks throughout the day. The randomness and the unpredictability of those checks is in accordance with ICAO’s expectations, the International Organisation’s expectations, and as you’d expect, the Australian Government takes the safety and security of our residents as our highest priority and we are working with security agencies to achieve that.
Fran Kelly: Okay. The Transport Workers’ Union claims it has raised concerns before, for a number of years, about the security implications of high staff turnover at our airports, and they argue that every day, hundreds of workers are accessing secure areas of airports without proper checks and without proper security clearance. Now, you said there already, the security checks are conducted on those who work in secure areas. Practically, what difference will these new measures make?
Darren Chester: Well fundamentally, that claim by the TWU is not true. If you have access to a secured area of an airport, you are subject to having an ASIC card—so, that Aviation Security Identification Card which I referred to earlier—and that means you have had to undertake some background checks. We are making moves right now within the Parliament; we have legislation before the Parliament to toughen that up, to make it even harder to get that ASIC card in the first place. So that’s the first point: you need to have an ASIC before you can work in those secured areas, or you can have a visitor security card, in which case you must be supervised and you can only use that card for 28 days over a 12 month period. So, it’s not true to suggest that people working in secured areas aren’t subject to background checks—they’re subject to them already—but we are actually taking steps to toughen those checks up to make sure that people who have a serious crime background don’t have the capacity to secure an ASIC card in the future. So, people who may have been involved in drug trafficking or even potentially illegal gun importation, they’ll find it impossible to secure an ASIC into the future and we want to work with the unions, work with the Labor Party, to bring those changes into place.
Fran Kelly: So Minister, after that alleged plot was uncovered to put some kind of explosive device on an international flight, there was a lot of talk about tougher checks and tougher measures being put in place. This random explosive checks, what else is being put in place?
Darren Chester: Well, on that point, Fran, the legislation to allow these random checks went through the House in March this year, so long before the alleged terror plot…
Fran Kelly: Okay. So what’s been put in place post that?
Darren Chester: So steps were underway already on expert advice. In relation to the Sydney incident: as you’d be aware, the National Security Committee of Cabinet has met and had discussions about that. I’m obviously not in the position to talk about the discussion that have occurred there, but what you would have seen—if you’re a regular traveller—you would have seen elevated screening activity at our airports, that’d be obvious to anyone travelling through an airport. While admittedly in the aftermath, the security screening was escalated quite dramatically. It has remained at a higher level than it was in the past. Many travellers may have noticed additional canine patrols, so dog patrols around the front of house at our airports.
There are other measures, which will be less obvious to people and happen behind the scenes, and I’m really not in a position to talk about all the security measures that are in place at our airports. But I want to make the fundamental point though, Fran, that the security of the travelling public, the safety of airport workers, is an incredibly high priority for everyone involved in the industry and we need to keep…
Fran Kelly: I’m sure it is.
Darren Chester: and we need to keep the industry working. We need to make sure we have security settings which are proportionate to the risk and at the same time we need to keep people safe.
Fran Kelly: Okay. Well let me ask you, because as I understand it there are still no plans to force all of us who travel on airlines to produce photo ID before boarding domestic flights. Now, at the time the Australian Federal Police, aviation security experts, argued again—and I think they’ve argued before—that identity checks are needed to prevent criminals and fugitives boarding flights under false names. Do you think photo IDs are not needed?
Darren Chester: Well, Fran, strictly from an aviation security perspective, the greatest interest is around what is the person carrying either on their person or amongst their belongings or checked in baggage. So in terms of the screening of baggage and screening of a person, the person’s identity doesn’t really impact on that question of are they safe to get on the plane. So that’s…
Fran Kelly: Well, unless they have got a record in terrorism activities.
Darren Chester: But, the next point is around for…
Fran Kelly: They might miss the random testing.
Darren Chester: Well, can I just finish for a second, Fran. The problem with the Australian licence system in terms of car licence systems is they are individual licence systems in each state and they’re not linked up on any consistent database. So there is no single form of identification available to Australians right now that would meet the standards you’re referring to that you have to provide photo ID before you can get on a plane.
So there’s an active conversation—you have seen the public debate; I’ve been aware of that as well—about whether you need to provide photographic ID for a domestic flight. But in terms of is it safe to travel right now in Australia, I’d say it is. I travel almost on a daily basis and I want to reassure the travelling public that we are doing everything within our power to keep it as safe as it possibly can be. So the question around photo ID for domestic flights is an active conversation within security circles at the moment and I’m looking forward to participating in that debate.
Fran Kelly: Minister, thank you very much for joining us.
Darren Chester: Thanks, Fran. All the best.

Hmm...no comment - Rolleyes



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6D AGAD trips the BS meter into extreme Dodgy

[Image: bsmeter-smiley.gif?w=280&h=210&fit=crop]
Hmm...I can see why Hitch has been saving this one up, via Oz Flying Rolleyes :

Quote:[Image: Darren_Chester_RAAA.jpg]Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester. (Steve Hitchen)

Chester calls for Industry Unity
3 November 2017
Comments 0 Comments
    0
Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester has called for a united aviation industry to help him take action in Canberra.

Speaking at the Regional Aviation Association of Australia (RAAA) conference on the Gold Coast last week, Chester said fractured opinion was not helping aviation's cause within the halls of Parliament House.

"There's opportunities for [those of] us who are passionate about aviation to focus that passion in a way that we are not ever splintering in the view we take to state and federal governments," he said.

"One of the really difficult things for a minister is to get a consolidated view from industry, and then have to argue that case on their behalf within cabinet at a state or federal level.

"The worst thing we can do is be splintering in a way that lets governments say 'the industry can't agree with itself'. Once we've got that consolidated view, it's a lot easier for your minister, whether it be at state or federal level, to argue the case on your behalf within the cabinet setting."

Chester's mantra on industry unity has been consistent since he took over the portfolio from Warren Truss, telling a forum held in Tamworth in May 2016 that he was getting very different opinions from industry people and he felt this was a challenge for himself as minister.

Even so, Chester went on to say last week that he felt things were looking up for aviation in Australia.

"I'm opimistic; I'm confident about the future," he said, "but I'm not someone who doesn't recognise we've got some challenges.
"I think we're heading in the right direction."

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...oUJWhz9.99
 
No comment, instead I'll quote directly from the - hard hitting, hold no punches - "K" post: Did hoody miss the 0803 from Nadi?

Quote:The thing which amazes most is the Hood elevation to ‘top-dog’ ATSB – how, FDS can that be? When the Norfolk ditching is unresolved and don’t, not for a moment think that Manning’s little effort (a 500 page re-hash,-sans all facts) will answer all the questions. It simply will not. It dare not...

...This man lied – several times. John McConvicts pet odalisque ain’t fit, nor proper to be making sanction ‘decisions’ let alone running the nations principal safety agency.

[Image: 800px-Odalisque.jpg]

So why is he minister?  If that question is too hard for you to answer – I can, at length, explain it and provide the answer. Your problem then becomes simple; do you really want all of this in the public purview. Yes or No will suffice – we will wait until Sunday. Then, the gloves will come off. That minister, is a promise you can take to the bank.
 
Bring it on "K" - Wink


MTF..P2 Tongue
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[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-12-at-1.21.57-PM.png]

VOTE 1 Britza for new England - Big Grin

From ACP, via PRWire:

Quote:New England Candidate announces investigation into CASA needed.


Ian Britza, has today announced a policy statement calling for a full review into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Australian Country Party candidate for New England Ian Britza, has today announced a policy statement calling for a full review into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Mr Britza said 'Its just not on that so much red tape can be put in front of our aviation clubs and businesses. This could have a long term affect on general aviation in this Country, something needs to be done."

Details of the statement are:

The Aviation industry is in serious decline because of unnecessary regulation. Australia is witnessing pilots and businesses exiting the industry in increasing numbers.

Because of this decline there will be serious consequences including employment and infrastructure losses, reducing aviation services in Australia. Allowing the decline to continue could see the end of aviation in Australia.

The Australian Country Party advocates for a full investigation and review of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) that would look at over-regulation, allegations of collusion and process stalling and management of the authority which is responsible for major failings in it’s policies and regulation of the aviation industry. Unnecessary policy and regulation are now crippling flying clubs and small businesses, evidenced with aircraft registrations down 53% and general aviation pilots down 34% in the last 10 years.

Flying clubs provide a starting point for people learning to fly and often the first step towards commercial flying, but over-regulation is forcing these clubs and airfields out of business where only multi-national companies would be able to sustain the increasing regulation requirements. This could eventually force all pilot training offshore.

Over regulation includes the following areas just to name a few:

1.Aviation Medical requirements 
2. Air Operator Certificate regulation and compliance
3.Flight school regulation and compliance
4. Aircraft maintenance regulation and compliance

Adopting the United States or New Zealand approach is a step in the right direction. 

[Image: Untitled_Clipping_091017_095355_AM.jpg]


MTF...P2  Tongue
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(11-04-2017, 07:20 AM)Peetwo Wrote: [Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-12-at-1.21.57-PM.png]

VOTE 1 Britza for new England - Big Grin

From ACP, via PRWire:

Quote:New England Candidate announces investigation into CASA needed.


Ian Britza, has today announced a policy statement calling for a full review into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Australian Country Party candidate for New England Ian Britza, has today announced a policy statement calling for a full review into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Mr Britza said 'Its just not on that so much red tape can be put in front of our aviation clubs and businesses. This could have a long term affect on general aviation in this Country, something needs to be done."

Details of the statement are:

The Aviation industry is in serious decline because of unnecessary regulation. Australia is witnessing pilots and businesses exiting the industry in increasing numbers.

Because of this decline there will be serious consequences including employment and infrastructure losses, reducing aviation services in Australia. Allowing the decline to continue could see the end of aviation in Australia.

The Australian Country Party advocates for a full investigation and review of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) that would look at over-regulation, allegations of collusion and process stalling and management of the authority which is responsible for major failings in it’s policies and regulation of the aviation industry. Unnecessary policy and regulation are now crippling flying clubs and small businesses, evidenced with aircraft registrations down 53% and general aviation pilots down 34% in the last 10 years.

Flying clubs provide a starting point for people learning to fly and often the first step towards commercial flying, but over-regulation is forcing these clubs and airfields out of business where only multi-national companies would be able to sustain the increasing regulation requirements. This could eventually force all pilot training offshore.

Over regulation includes the following areas just to name a few:

1.Aviation Medical requirements 
2. Air Operator Certificate regulation and compliance
3.Flight school regulation and compliance
4. Aircraft maintenance regulation and compliance

Adopting the United States or New Zealand approach is a step in the right direction. 



Dear ACP,

Your policy about General Aviation is correct;  the administration of aviation, and GA in particular, is a disaster area of monumental proportions with the loss of thousands of jobs. 

For example the Civil Aviation Safety Authority as the independent regulator has been rewriting the rules for almost 30 years as a never ending make work program costing hundreds of $millions.  The latest tranche of new rules are, quoting CASA Chairman Jeff Boyd (Tamworth GA meeting May 2016), “a mess”. 

Pretty good going for a body with great ‘working’ conditions and a CEO on $600,000 pa. still peddling messages about “getting it right”, “evidence based” decision making and the nonsense about “just culture.”

“Just culture” being code for the following;  CASA believes it is the police, judge, jury and executioner and the normal rule of law and proper justice via the courts don’t apply to CASA in its exercise of unfettered power.
 
With respect, unfortunately your policy for a government “heavy industry” is totally at odds with free enterprise and I have to say extremely retrograde. Nationalisation of industry does not work, this notion has gone by way of the Dodo. One only has to view how hopeless is government at running business of any sort and go back to the wreckage of Communism destroying whole economies to wonder how could you wish for such a step backwards. Protectionism and state run industry is counter to freedom and prosperity, these policies conflict with your other policies of private property rights and less government interference. 

I do hope your policies can be changed because you could become a new force, a new wave of responsible government and freeing us from the old Crown model of top down government dishing out “privileges” which are in fact our rights to live and work as a free people. 

You could look to reining in Can’tberra, near 400,000 on wages 42% higher than average and killing free enterprise in this country.

Your policy of a government controlled heavy industry would add enormously to the bureaucracy, please scotch that one, 

Regards,

Sandy Reith 

Retired General Aviation aircraft and airport owner operator, Chief Flying Instructor etc the whole 9 yards in GA. over 50 years watching in dismay the destruction of a perfectly good industry. 

[Image: Untitled_Clipping_091017_095355_AM.jpg]

MTF...P2 Tongue
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Ian Britza, has today announced a policy statement calling for a full review into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Australian Country Party candidate for New England Ian Britza, has today announced a policy statement calling for a full review into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Mr Britza said 'Its just not on that so much red tape can be put in front of our aviation clubs and businesses. This could have a long term affect on general aviation in this Country, something needs to be done."


"Something needs to be done"

We trumpet Australia as being "The Lucky country" that may be true, but are we the smartest?

I would say Lucky we may be, but that luck will one day run out and sooner than anyone may imagine.

Aviation is just one industry amongst a Plethora of industries being hobbled by incompetent self serving Bureaucrats.

We point the finger and rant about the incompetence of our Politicians, for sure they must accept some of the blame for the decent of Australia into its current morass of angst, but they do not make decisions in a vacuum.

They rely on "Advice" to inform their decision making process and much of that advice comes from the ruling class of bureaucrats who once upon a time served the public interest. It is them that decide what is good for us and what is becoming very apparent they are through ineptitude, arrogance, or plain stupidity not doing their job.

Government is charged by the people with managing the country.
In much the same way with a company, a board of directors sets policy and the general direction a company should take, then charges management with the task of implementing that policy and direction.

In the case of Aviation in Australia, inept and incompetent and unqualified management is running the board not the other way round.

The shareholders of this country, "the people" must also bear some responsibility for the foolishness of ruling class. Our apathy enables vocal minority activists to influence political decisions to their views and self interests over the views of the majority, at the same time big business massages the egos and no doubt the bank balances of decision makers to see things their way, the greater good gets left behind in decision making processes.

The mess the country finds itself in with energy policy is a classic example. The most energy rich nation on earth, suddenly finds itself with the most expensive energy on earth. How the hell did that happen?
It didn't happen over night, it happened over an extended period of time. Poor policy heavily influenced by fractious focus groups, inept bureaucrats failing to see and advise of unintended consequences, and lazy politicians until it arrived at the current crisis.

In the same manner over the years CAsA has been left to its own devises completely oblivious to the damage its ineptitude and incompetence was inflicting on an industry, an industry that gave it its whole purpose.
Good policy was subverted by self serving bureaucrats, hundreds of millions of dollars of taxpayers money thrown away on a folly. Was that smart? I hardly think so.
Here we are today, the foolishness and arrogance of self serving bureaucrats trundling us towards that inevitable precipice.
If, as was mandated all those years ago in the early eighties, we had adopted the US regulations, we would have the safest flying environment on the planet rather than a myth, we would have a vibrant industry contributing to the overall wellbeing of the country, we would have saved the taxpayer hundreds of millions of dollars.

I strongly support an inquiry into CAsA, its ineptitude, its stupidity, its complete and utter failure to comply with government policy, its malfeasance in destroying the hopes and dreams of so many people and its complete failure to achieve any of the benchmarks set for it. They were not charged with the task of destroying an industry, they were charged with regulating to make it as safe as possible. The consequence of their actions have merely made Australia the most expensive country in which to commit aviation with the inevitable unintended consequence of being no safer than anyone else with an impoverished unviable industry.
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'Nuff Sed:---

The inescapable conclusion is that today’s political leaders, federal and state, treat taxpayers’ money with contempt. They cultivate a culture which fosters conceit and deflects responsibility for failure. These days, announcements pass for policy. Implementation is for others to worry about.


And we complain about capitalism? Such negligence would see corporate executives fired, sued or in jail and their businesses bankrupted. That’s how the private sector is cleansed.

Except the half billion CASA have squandered making us safe from criminals.  
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LNP/Nationals with division in the ranks - Rolleyes

There was a rumour going around that in the lead up to the High Court MP citizenship decision, which saw Barnaby being ruled ineligible to be a sitting MP and therefore the parliamentary leader of the Nats, 6D AGAD attempted a leadership coup of his own.

However this attempted coup was fortunately nipped in the bud and this is how that all ended up: (via News.com.au article: Darren Chester is the most senior party MP but hasn’t been made acting Nationals leader)

Quote:...HE DOESN’T like the comparison, but there is one National MP shaping up to be the Steven Bradbury of his party.

He is one of the few party leaders still standing after the High Court pileup on Friday scuttled leader Barnaby Joyce and his deputy leader Fiona Nash.

And purists might argue he is the only genuine top-echelon Nat.

Darren Chester, the Minister for Transport, will be the most senior National in the House of Representatives when it returns on November 27, in the absence of Barnaby Joyce.

A cabinet member, he will be the leader of 15 House of Reps MPs in the week before Mr Joyce stands in the New England by-election of December 2, and for the following 10 days at least before the counting of postal votes and the formal declaration of the election result.

That is expected to mean Mr Joyce will miss the final two sitting weeks of the House of Representatives, and that Mr Chester will be carrying the party banner in the Reps.

But he won’t be acting leader of his party. That temporary job has gone to indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion, who was elected as a Country Liberal Party candidate in the Northern Territory, and who will lead a total of five National Party senators...

...However, the Labor Opposition could support Government legislation to introduce same sex marriage, should it top the postal survey result to be released on November 15.

This could mean the real mischief, and even chaos, could come from Government MPs opposed to SSM, such as former prime minister Tony Abbott.

Darren Chester will have the task of maintaining discipline among his own troops, particularly those who might think about crossing the floor on issues such as a banking royal commission...

...Meanwhile, Mr Chester has made clear he won’t be involved in any internal National Party skirmishing.

“Obviously we took a blow yesterday with Fiona Nash and Barnaby Joyce being ruled out by the High Court, but we have Nigel Scullion as our interim parliamentary leader, so when Parliament returns Nigel will fulfil that role,” he said Saturday.

“Barnaby will continue as the Leader of the Nationals at large, if you like. I mean, much the same way as Campbell Newman was the leader of the LNP before he was even elected to (state) Parliament.

“We believe Barnaby will be returned in the New England by-election; he’s worked damn hard for that community, he’s worked damn hard for all regional Australians, and we believe that will be recognised in this by-election.”

But now it would seem there is more trouble afoot for 6D AGAD and the revolt is being led by none other than Barry O... Confused

Again via News.com.au:

Quote:Gay marriage bill revenge: Conservative plan to launch royal commission into banks

CONSERVATIVE MPs are threatening to launch a royal commission into the banking sector after they were thwarted by a rival gay marriage bill.

Claire Bickers
News Corp Australia Network November 17, 2017 9:58am [Image: b7bbfad4fcf70dfef36bc938d425c60e]
A new push to launch a banking royal commission will be a major headache for Malcolm Turnbull if it succeeds. Picture: AAPSource:AAP

CONSERVATIVE MPs are threatening to launch a royal commission into the banking sector after they were thwarted by a rival gay marriage bill.

Turnbull Government Minister Mathias Cormann has already moved to quash the revolt against the government’s position.

The Finance Minister told Sky News even if the bid was successful in parliament, it was up to the government to launch a royal commission.

“The government’s position is that we do not support the establishment of a banking royal commission because it will be an expensive, slow and long-lasting exercise, which won’t actually do anything to improve things for people across Australia,” he said.

It comes after Fairfax Media reported today that conservative senators in the National Party, who felt ambushed by Liberal Senator Dean Smith’s bill to legalise same-sex marriage, were planning use the same tactics to launch a banking royal commission.

It would be hugely embarrassing for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in the final sitting weeks of the year if the move succeeded.

Queensland senator Barry O’Sullivan told the Australian Financial Review that he would reveal a private member’s bill to establish the royal commission next Thursday.

[Image: ecf8044d8f5c5b09bf6d0efe01f4fe91]
Senator Barry O'Sullivan is planning the new push for a royal commission. Picture: Kym SmithSource:News Corp Australia

Labor, the Greens and crossbench senators would co-sponsor the bill, as happened with Senator Dean Smith’s bill to legalise same-sex marriage this week.

The bill would have the numbers to pass the upper house if it was introduced there first.

Senator O’Sullivan may try to introduce it there on the November 27 sitting week but it will have almost no chance to be debated that week while the senate is dealing with the gay marriage bill.

His chances of success are also lower in the House of Representatives where he would need Coalition MPs to cross the floor and go against the government’s position for it to pass.

Fairfax reports senator O’Sullivan is already speaking to Queensland MP George Christensen about whether he will support the move.

[Image: c2dc4d97098bf02c55110fa90569166b]
George Christensen has threatened to cross the floor over the royal commission in the past. Picture: Kym SmithSource:News Corp Australia

About 10 Coalition senators who opposed the same-sex marriage bill are reportedly behind the push for a royal commission after they were thwarted in their attempt to put forward a rival bill on gay marriage, made public by Liberal senator James Paterson on Monday.

Senator O’Sullivan told Fairfax Media: “We have been treated with contempt rather than harmonise the Smith and Paterson bills.”
[img=0x0]https://i1.wp.com/pixel.tcog.cp1.news.com.au/track/news/content/v2/?t_product=newscomau&t_domain=news.com.au&esi=true&td_part=bottom&td_device=desktop&td_section=national+politics&t_template=s3/ncatemp/index@promo[/img]

In a ABC Lateline interview this was how 6D AGAD tried to downplay this apparent disunity amongst the Conservative National and Coalition backbenchers:

Quote:The Late Debate reviews a momentous week in Parliament

(see here from approx. 06:10 - http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/the-late-...in/9164032)
  
Posted Fri 17 Nov 2017, 9:30pm
Updated Sat 18 Nov 2017, 8:34am
Expires: Saturday 17 November 2018 9:30pm

This week, the country voted strongly in support of same-sex marriage, more politicians were caught up in the citizenship saga and two State Governments debated voluntary assisted dying. Matt Wordsworth was joined by Infrastructure Minister and Nationals MP Darren Chester and Shadow Health Minister and Victorian Labor MP Catherine King for our Late Debate.


Transcript

...MATT WORDSWORTH: Just on the no voters, there seems to be some discontent within the National backbench - a couple of my colleagues, Anna Henderson and Lucy Barbour, are reporting today that the Nats, led by Queensland Senator Barry O'Sullivan, are planning a backbench bill to establish a royal commission into the banks as retribution over the speed of the Dean Smith bill.

What can you tell me about that?

DARREN CHESTER: Well, it is not the National Party policy and I haven't had any conversations with the two colleagues you've referred to from Queensland. I'm not aware of any other that I've seen in the media today.

Our policy is that the protocols were put in place, the additional resources ...

MATT WORDSWORTH: But are you aware that they are unhappy about the speed, the priority that's been given to the Dean Smith bill because they say there is also a priority among the population for a banking royal commission?

DARREN CHESTER: Well, I would dispute that position in terms of a priority in the community around the banking royal commission.

I have been a Member of Parliament for nine and a half years and I can count on one hand the number of times I have had constituents come to me in relation to the major banks.

There is no doubt that the steps we've taken in terms of the enquiries that have been held, implementation of recommendations to provide greater scrutiny, more accountability for banking executives.

I mean a royal commission would be a very expensive way of finding out exactly what we have already undertaken - that is providing additional resources to make sure the banks are held to account.

Now I'm not aware of the discussions you have referred to, other than to say it is not the National Party policy to have a royal commission into banks.

Although we have a very robust party room and many of my colleagues express views from time-to-time which may not necessarily be the entire policy of the National Party or the Coalition but they are entitled to express their views and they do quite forcefully.

MATT WORDSWORTH: Catherine King is bipartisan on this bill looking a little wobbly?

CATHERINE KING: My view very firmly is the Dean Smith bill, which has been before the Parliament, it has been before a committee, that is the bill that I will be supporting when that comes before the House of Representatives.

I think the country's voted. We need to get this done. I don't want to see any excuse or delay used by the no case and we're seeing, again, a whole raft of break-outs here and there about these issues.

I think it is really important, of course, the Dean Smith bill does provide protections for ministers of religion who choose not to marry same-sex couples and I think anyone who wants to then try and entrench further discrimination beyond religious ministers, I think, frankly, really will struggle to get that through the Parliament as they should.

This is really an issue that the Australia public is expecting us to get done and my view is that we should vote on that at the earliest possible opportunity.

I do think what we are seeing, this is a survey we didn't particularly want, the Labor Party didn't want to go down this pathway, you know, it has done some damage to many of the people, people in the LGBTIQ communities as they have had to have their relationships basically put on public scrutiny and it's been a pretty horrendous process.
I don't think they should be put through anything more. We need to get the Parliament to do its job now.

The Australian people have done theirs but I do think what you are seeing is the problem that you are seeing within the Coalition at the moment, and within the Liberal National Party, is there is a real fight about values at the heart of the Liberal National Party.
And it's been writ large all over the place. It's leading for a bit of chaos frankly and that is probably what you have seen with the notion that there might be a banking royal commission, of course, which is our policy and we would welcome working with the Nats on it.

MATT WORDSWORTH: Darren Chester, is there a battle on behind the scenes in the Coalition?

DARREN CHESTER: Well, there is always a contest of ideas in public life, Matt.
I mean the National Party is a very robust party room.

CATHERINE KING: Spilling out in public.

DARREN CHESTER: Well, there is always a battle of ideas and we discuss the whole range of topics in our party room. We don't need to discuss them live on TV.

MATT WORDSWORTH: Well, Barry O'Sullivan has certainly came out and fired a warning shot it would appear.

DARREN CHESTER: Well, in terms of a royal commission, Matt, let's keep in mind it would cost in the order of $150 million to really establish what's already been undertaken by ...

MATT WORDSWORTH: Well, you spent $122 (million) on the postal survey.

DARREN CHESTER: And that's a fair point you've raised Matt and I have to say that in terms of that, the money spent on the postal survey, and Labor was against it and Labor didn't trust the Australian people to have their say but now having had their say, I think it's been a vindication of the position that I took, in terms of support of same-sex marriage and Catherine took.

I think it gives an extra level of credibility to the national vote in the sense that the people have spoken, the tribe have spoken, if you like and now we need to get on with the job.

MATT WORDSWORTH: So would you encourage Barry O'Sullivan to shelve that private members bill for a banking royal commission?

DARREN CHESTER: Well, I don't know if Barry has even got a private members bill. I have seen newspaper reports.

MATT WORDSWORTH: He certainly is talking about it.

DARREN CHESTER: Well, I've seen newspaper reports, you see media report.

MATT WORDSWORTH: You can trust the ABC, Darren Chester.

DARREN CHESTER: (Laughs) Yes, Matt, I am sure I can but I'm saying I've seen media reports. I haven't had any conversations with Barry about that.

I simply say there is a lot of extra steps, additional protocols, regulations being put in place, to make sure we hold the banks to account and I think the existing changes we've made, the bank chief executives having to appear before the standing committee, the House of Representatives standing committee, the banking executives additional regulations in place, all these have actually been positive steps towards providing that accountability regime which I think was required and is needed.

I'm not sure that spending another $100 million, $150 million on a lawyers' picnic or a royal commission would achieve much at all.

Couple the backbench dissent with the ongoing Senate DW1 inquiry, the Airservices performance inquiry, the dormant Airports Amendment Bill 2016 inquiry and the (new) just announced Senate Inquiry...  (Reference: Senate & RRAT Committee news: 17 Nov '17  & Airservices now 'match fit' and approaching a red dawn horizon)

Quote:The operation, regulation and funding of air route service delivery to rural, regional and remote communities, with particular reference to:

(a) social and economic impacts of air route supply and airfare pricing;
(b) different legal, regulatory, policy and pricing frameworks and practices across the Commonwealth, states and territories;
© how airlines determine fare pricing;
(d) the determination of airport charges for landing and security fees, aircraft type and customer demand;
(e) pricing determination, subsidisation and equity of airfares;
(f) determination of regulated routes and distribution of residents' fares across regulated routes;
(g) airline competition within rural and regional routes;
(h) consistency of aircraft supply and retrieval of passengers by airlines during aircraft maintenance and breakdown;
(i) all related costs and charges imposed by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority; and
(j) any related matters.

[Image: 247871.jpg] Senator O'SULLIVAN (Queensland) (12:18): I seek leave to make a short statement.

The PRESIDENT: Leave is granted for one minute.
[Image: 247871.jpg] Senator O'SULLIVAN: I want to thank the Labor Party for their cooperation and support for the development of this reference, which will be, of course, under the chairmanship of Senator Sterle. This is a very important reference. I am speaking out now to our crossbench colleagues to pay attention to this and support it. This is about trying to bring equity into the cost impacts of regional airline movements for our people in regional Australia, not just my home state of Queensland. We've got some very atrocious examples of gouging where it costs up to $2,000 for people to travel the same distances it costs them $78 to travel between the metros, including people who require constant medical attention and are having to go to the cities. This has to be brought to an end, and we hope this committee reference will take us some way towards being able to make recommendations to government about changes.

Question agreed to.
 
 ...6D AGAD is seriously under siege from his own party while being found to be totally inept in discharging his ministerial duties of overseeing and providing proper governance to the aviation safety bureaucracy... Dodgy  

Quote from "K" off this week's SBG sums up the current farce frustrating the long suffering aviation industry: Reference - One if by land, two if by sea , three if by pigeon.   
 
Quote:...It is time to put an end to this expensive farce. It is time to enforce, vigorously, the recommendations of both the Senate committee and the Rev. Forsyth. ATSB and CASA are charged, by government, to meet the requirements of the Acts which govern them. Both agencies are failing not only to meet the spirit and intent of those Acts, but have perverted the meaning of those Acts to suit. Then, I look at Chester and despair. If it were not for the excellent Senators I’d hang the boots up, retire to being an amiable old buffer who talked to dogs and horses, pottered about the wood shed and threw rocks at drones. Someone, somewhere has to get the agencies back on track, under control and functioning correctly; then; I look at Chester…………



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Barry O ramps up call for Bank Commission of inquiry - Confused

Via ABC & RN Breakfast... Wink

Quote:Banks show 'disregard' for the law, Government MPs may cross the floor to back inquiry

By senior business correspondent Peter Ryan

Updated about 5 hours agoMon 20 Nov 2017, 1:31pm

[Image: 6757314-3x2-340x227.jpg]

Photo:
Last financial year, those pesky $2 fees 'foreign ATM' fees brought in over half a billion dollars for financial institutions. (AAP)



Pressure for a commission of inquiry into the banking sector is growing, with Nationals senator Barry O'Sullivan warning he might have the numbers to push his private members bill through Parliament.

Key points:
  • Banks show a "disregard" for the law, Nationals senator Barry O'Sullivan says
  • In contrast, the Government has been long resisted calls for a royal commission into the banking sector
  • Senator O'Sullivan said up to four of his colleagues are willing to cross the floor to bring on this debate
The banks "show an an almost autistic disregard for prudential regulation and law and it's time for these people to have their day in court", the senator told ABC's RN Breakfast on Monday.

Senator O'Sullivan said he has support from as many as four colleagues.

These include maverick Liberal National (LNP) MP George Christensen, who has already threatened to cross the floor, and fellow Queensland LNP MP Llew O'Brien, who has indicated "50-50" support.

An embarrassment for the Government

While a commission of inquiry would be an embarrassment for the Turnbull Government given its resistance to a royal commission, Senator O'Sullivan said it was time for the Prime Minister to listen.

"There's no more important piece of business — millions and millions of Australians have been affected by the behaviour of the banks over time," he said.

Quote:"The people of Australia are sick to their eye teeth of the Parliament not functioning.

"If both houses of Parliament think this is a good thing to do … then I think the Prime Minister has to … sit up and take note of that, and support the parliamentary decision."
But Senator O'Sullivan refused to comment on whether his move would embarrass and further destabilise the Prime Minister.

"I am not going to be drawn on the question of the impacts on the Prime Minister and the Government — this is about democracy at work."

O'Sullivan 'committed to this course'

The proposed commission of inquiry would have similar powers to a royal commission.
It would also look beyond banking and include superannuation, insurance and services associated with the scandal-plagued sector.

While a royal commission needs to be established by the executive, a commission of inquiry can be passed if both houses of parliament agree.

However, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has today emailed crossbenchers to inform them that the Lower House will resume sitting on December 4.

Profit at what cost?

[Image: 340x180-commonwealth-bank-generic-data.jpg]

The latest allegations against the Commonwealth Bank highlight a deeply disturbing failure, Ian Verrender writes.

This timing coincides with the New England by-election, scheduled for December 2, which is expected to return former deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce to office.

After that, it would take three MPs to cross the floor to bring on debate for a commission of inquiry in the Lower House, raising the potential vote of no confidence in the Government.

"A commission of inquiry can be decided by the parliament and I expect it will be binding on the executive of government. And I think the parliament is an appropriate place for a commission of inquiry to report back to," Senator O'Sullivan said.

"We are after all the legislators, and we are the ones who'll have to bring out legislation and regulation, prudential and otherwise.

"So I think [members of Parliament] … are the appropriate people to receive the report."
Senator O'Sullivan maintained that his private members bill has a good chance of being approved.

"A bill produced by the Greens made its way through the Senate without any difficulty, and my ambition is to ensure all that they want in an inquiry is homogenised into the bill that I'm developing," he said.

Quote:"I'm committed to this course now, and I have been for some period of time.

"There hasn't been a pathway before, so there are a number of us who are very keen on this issue and I think it's timely."

Senator O'Sullivan said an updated exposure draft of the bill could emerge on Wednesday or Thursday to deal with protections for small business and the rural sector in the terms of reference.

'No evidence' to justify a commission of inquiry

Australian Bankers Association chief executive Anna Bligh argued Senator O'Sullivan has not provided any evidence to justify a commission of inquiry or the estimated $53 million cost of a royal commission.

"As yet no one has seen legislation from Senator O'Sullivan and nobody knows what terms of reference he might be proposing, so it's impossible to comment," Ms Bligh said.

Ms Bligh accused Senator O'Sullivan and his supporters of "seeking revenge" because "they didn't get their way in the same-sex marriage debate".

"That's an extraordinary way to make public policy.

Quote:"Taking the first opportunity to go in and do something that would critically destabilise the Government I think will be seen for what it is."

Ms Bligh said the major banks would cooperate with any inquiry, but said customers had already been compensated for major scandals such as CommInsure.

Last week, former ANZ Bank chief executive Mike Smith said banks were being used by the Government as political capital saying "when you want to get mob interest you turn on the banks — Hitler did it."

Ms Bligh described Mr Smith's comments as "colourful" but agreed "there has been a level of demonisation in relation to banks that is unnecessary and unhelpful".



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Deep divisions within the Turnbull Government over banking inquiry
It's payback time for the government over the same-sex marriage legislation with the Nationals pushing a private member's bill that would establish a Commission of Inquiry into the banks.


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