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Shame or fame for Chester?
Miniscule 6D AGAD Chester bellys up at West Sale - Blush

Looks like the story has got out now... Big Grin

Via the Oz:


Quote:‘Wheels-up’ landing puts air safety minister’s flight in peril

[Image: 764cfa1486a86ee027d0a8b76d0c1dd2?width=650]
Transport Minister Darren Chester.

[Image: 62e2c329e70cecdc762c6821b9e80d9c?width=650]
The type of Cessna 337 light plane involved in the incident.
  • 12:00AM December 15, 2017
  • [size=undefined]
    [Image: joe_kelly.png]
    Political reporter
    Canberra

    The cabinet minister responsible for air safety was involved in a “wheels-up” landing after the pilot became distracted by a mobile phone and failed to lower the landing gear, in what the regulator dubbed a “serious incident”.

    Transport Minister Darren Chester was travelling in the back seat of the light plane on a Nov­ember 10 flight from Essendon to West Sale in regional Victoria. He realised the pilot had not lowered the wheels only when he heard the belly of the Cessna 337 scraping along the runway.

    The incident was reported immediately to transport safety regulators, who were faced with the unusual decision of considering whether to mount an investigation into an incident involving their own minister.

    The Australian Transport Safety Bureau categorised the mishap as a “serious incident” and concluded that an accident had nearly occurred, although it decided not to pursue the issue, while a separate report was also filed with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

    [Image: 1d748bd26cb8352481a03ec88a4fbed5?width=650]
    “During approach, the crew did not extend the landing gear resulting in a wheels-up landing. The aircraft sustained minor damage,” the ATSB report found.

    The Australian understands the light plane skidded for up to 250m and its rear propeller made very light contact with the ground. Mr Chester said the incident lasted for only a matter of seconds.

    “It was surprisingly smooth and the only time I became aware that something had gone wrong was when I heard the noise of the fuse­lage making contact with the runway,” he told The Australian.

    The plane belongs to and was piloted by Mark Noble, the director of Bairnsdale Air Charter, which has been operating in the Gippsland region since 1966.

    The Australian has confirmed the company was not the operator for the November 10 flight involving Mr Chester.

    Mr Noble is well known to Mr Chester, who yesterday confirmed he had flown with him on hundreds of occasions, saying the pilot had accumulated about 9000 hours in the air.

    “I regard him as a highly capable and professional pilot and I look forward to flying with him again. He indicated he made a mistake and fortunately neither of us was injured,” Mr Chester said.

    The Australian has confirmed that Mr Noble became distracted when his mobile phone rang upon descent to the West Sale Aerodrome and filed a report with the ATSB and CASA indi­cating this.

    It is understood that Mr Noble did not answer the phone calls, but became distracted by how loud the ringtone on the phone was.

    “The pilot indicated he has appropriate protocols in place not to take phone calls during landing but he failed to switch off his phone — it’s just a simple case of human error,” Mr Chester said.

    “He had the right policies in place, but the phone wasn’t turned off.”

    He played down the incident, saying it was an “amazingly calm” and “uneventful” landing.

    Mr Noble said he had reviewed his protocols to ensure a similar incident did not recur: “Basically, the phone is disconnected from the top of descent. And then they are rechecked at 1000 feet where, as before, they were disconnected at 1000 feet.”

    He said he was distracted by the ringtone’s volume. “It was turned up full,” he said. “It automatically connects to the audio system if the bluetooth is turned on. It just about blew my eardrums out and I went to turn it off ... It was very distracting.”

    The plane was jacked up and its wheels lowered so it could be moved off the runway.
    [/size]
  • &.. from the O&O thread: ATCB O&O investigation No: AO-2015-007

    Quote:  5 hours ago">Copy of ATSBSearchResults.xlsx (Size: 125.43 KB / Downloads: 4)      

    Ps.

    Quote: Wrote:




    Plane carrying federal transport minister in serious safety scare


    A plane carrying the federal transport minister has been involved in a serious safety scare.


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    Update: 17/12/17 - Chester bellys up at West Sale.


    (12-14-2017, 11:31 PM)Peetwo Wrote:
    Quote:‘Wheels-up’ landing puts air safety minister’s flight in peril

    [Image: 764cfa1486a86ee027d0a8b76d0c1dd2?width=650]
    Transport Minister Darren Chester.

    [Image: 62e2c329e70cecdc762c6821b9e80d9c?width=650]
    The type of Cessna 337 light plane involved in the incident.
    • 12:00AM December 15, 2017
    • [size=undefined]
      [Image: joe_kelly.png]
      Political reporter
      Canberra

      The cabinet minister responsible for air safety was involved in a “wheels-up” landing after the pilot became distracted by a mobile phone and failed to lower the landing gear, in what the regulator dubbed a “serious incident”.

      Transport Minister Darren Chester was travelling in the back seat of the light plane on a Nov­ember 10 flight from Essendon to West Sale in regional Victoria. He realised the pilot had not lowered the wheels only when he heard the belly of the Cessna 337 scraping along the runway.

      The incident was reported immediately to transport safety regulators, who were faced with the unusual decision of considering whether to mount an investigation into an incident involving their own minister.

      The Australian Transport Safety Bureau categorised the mishap as a “serious incident” and concluded that an accident had nearly occurred, although it decided not to pursue the issue, while a separate report was also filed with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

      [Image: 1d748bd26cb8352481a03ec88a4fbed5?width=650]
      “During approach, the crew did not extend the landing gear resulting in a wheels-up landing. The aircraft sustained minor damage,” the ATSB report found.

      The Australian understands the light plane skidded for up to 250m and its rear propeller made very light contact with the ground. Mr Chester said the incident lasted for only a matter of seconds.

      “It was surprisingly smooth and the only time I became aware that something had gone wrong was when I heard the noise of the fuse­lage making contact with the runway,” he told The Australian.

      The plane belongs to and was piloted by Mark Noble, the director of Bairnsdale Air Charter, which has been operating in the Gippsland region since 1966.

      The Australian has confirmed the company was not the operator for the November 10 flight involving Mr Chester.

      Mr Noble is well known to Mr Chester, who yesterday confirmed he had flown with him on hundreds of occasions, saying the pilot had accumulated about 9000 hours in the air.

      “I regard him as a highly capable and professional pilot and I look forward to flying with him again. He indicated he made a mistake and fortunately neither of us was injured,” Mr Chester said.

      The Australian has confirmed that Mr Noble became distracted when his mobile phone rang upon descent to the West Sale Aerodrome and filed a report with the ATSB and CASA indi­cating this.

      It is understood that Mr Noble did not answer the phone calls, but became distracted by how loud the ringtone on the phone was.

      “The pilot indicated he has appropriate protocols in place not to take phone calls during landing but he failed to switch off his phone — it’s just a simple case of human error,” Mr Chester said.

      “He had the right policies in place, but the phone wasn’t turned off.”

      He played down the incident, saying it was an “amazingly calm” and “uneventful” landing.

      Mr Noble said he had reviewed his protocols to ensure a similar incident did not recur: “Basically, the phone is disconnected from the top of descent. And then they are rechecked at 1000 feet where, as before, they were disconnected at 1000 feet.”

      He said he was distracted by the ringtone’s volume. “It was turned up full,” he said. “It automatically connects to the audio system if the bluetooth is turned on. It just about blew my eardrums out and I went to turn it off ... It was very distracting.”

      The plane was jacked up and its wheels lowered so it could be moved off the runway.
      [/size]
  • &.. from the O&O thread: ATCB O&O investigation No: AO-2015-007

    Quote:  5 hours ago">Copy of ATSBSearchResults.xlsx (Size: 125.43 KB / Downloads: 4)      

    Ps.

    Quote: Wrote:




    Plane carrying federal transport minister in serious safety scare


    A plane carrying the federal transport minister has been involved in a serious safety scare.
  • Comments via the Oz:





    Quote:Alexander2 DAYS AGO


    Very odd that this has remained under wraps until now or is it? Wouldn’t be Minister Chester trying to avoid light shining on his aviation rules expert body CASA or the accident investigator ATSB would it? The CASA that’s still in a colossal 30 yr make work program costing several hundred $million and killed off General Aviation in the process. The snail’s pace ATSB that has had to have the Australian Senate make it redo its faulty reporting and led to the Canadian safety investigator being called in to review same. Alex in the Rises

    Alexander2 DAYS AGO


    PS, sorry for Mr. Noble, very embarrassing. All such retractable wheels type aircraft have an audible warning horn system which sounds off when the power levers are reduced for landing and most times this will alert the pilot in time to avoid humiliation. Unfortunately the nature of controlling your flight path to a safe landing might mean carrying more power close to touch down and the warning then is too late. In this technically innovative era there could be means to overcome many such system deficiencies but in the General Aviation industry that is dying by a thousand regulatory cuts combined with CASA fee gouging and hopeless administration there’s little room or appetite for innovation. Never mind, at least it’s all ‘jobs and growth’ in Can’tberra, pop. near 400,000 and 1,200 Commonwealth instrumentalities. Alex again

    Rod2 DAYS AGO


    Proof indeed that the minister wouldn’t recognize an aircraft if it fell on him. just another one of a series presiding over the demise of the GA industry...

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    Chris2 DAYS AGO


    @Rod “Proof indeed”??? I wasn’t aware that passengers could be held accountable for aircraft incidents.

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    Ted2 DAYS AGO



    Chris, Rod is saying that it would be nice, some would say essential, that the minister for aviation knows a bit about flying and is on top of his portfolio.
    The way CASA is run , one would assume that’s not the case.
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    Alexander2 DAYS AGO


    PPS To those who have no direct knowledge of General Aviation (GA) flying and are reading some uncompromising criticisms of the pilot. Firstly, having had a pilot career in GA for more than 50 yrs, and having being personally involved in two wheels up landings, I have never heard of a person being injured in such cases. Quite different to larger aircraft, airliners wheels up landings are definitely high risk. Secondly to handle an aircraft to a safe landing may require, at times, a great level of skill. A gusting crosswind, visibility in rain, fluctuating wind direction, turbulence and wind shear, other traffic and radio chatter are some major concerns that might cause the pilot to prioritise his concentration on handling and in the process not make the final wheels check. It’s called human nature and I suggest it’s better to realise that no one is infallible; blame, shame and stomp on the pilot might be good for ego but will do nothing to diminish the risks. Actually wrong psychology probably increases the risk.

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    B J2 DAYS AGO


    @Alexander  It also goes against the no-blame self-reporting of all incidents culture that has made our skies infinitely safer.

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    Owen2 DAYS AGO


    @B J @Alexander You reckon the pilot would have to 'self report' this event? No one would have noticed anything unusual? Pull the other leg - it yodels!
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    Ted2 DAYS AGO



    Alexander, 300 feet, Stable approach, runway clear, pitch, undercarriage flap.
    That’s the call, says it all really
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    Owen2 DAYS AGO


    @Alexander So the next time I fly, do you think I should insist the cabin crew check with the pilot to see that he has not been so distracted that he has omitted some one or more essential actions?  i'm be ginning to think walking (even on our rather dangerous roads) may be preferable!
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    B J2 DAYS AGO



    @Owen @B J @Alexander  1) pretty hard to hide a Skymaster sitting on its belly.
    2) Yes, pilots do, including lapses in concentration. The reason for no blame reporting is to be able to do "Root Cause Analysis (ICAM...)" of incidents to prevent their recurrence. 
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    Botswana O'Hooligan2 DAYS AGO


    A prudent aviator turns his/her mobile communications device to "off" ere walking out to the machine and leaves it "off" until after walking well away from the machine after arrival. It is called common sense or stuff called airmanship if one wants to use fancy words. From engine/s start to transition, or to a safe level in lighties on the way up and down it is also prudent to maintain a sterile cockpit, one without idle chit chat or distractions because aviating can be a serious business and the method of stopping using the underbelly instead of wheels is passe on account of friction you understand.








  • MTF...P2
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    From the ABC...(and facebook!)

    Quote:Barnaby Joyce set to become infrastructure minister in Cabinet reshuffle
    By political reporter Lucy Barbour

    Tue 19 Dec 2017, 6:26am

    [Image: 8596246-3x2-340x227.jpg]

    Photo:
    The move will give Mr Joyce control of the inland rail project. (ABC News: Marco Catalano)

    Related Story: Brandis off to London, sparking pre-Christmas Cabinet reshuffle

    Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce is expected to take on the infrastructure portfolio when Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announces his Cabinet reshuffle, as early as today.

    The Nationals leader currently has responsibility for agriculture, but has been eyeing off the infrastructure job for months.

    The move will give him control of the Federal Government's multi-billion-dollar inland rail project.

    Mr Joyce would take the job from Victorian Nationals heavyweight Darren Chester, who has been a strong supporter of same-sex marriage and pushed for more women to take on senior positions in the party.

    It is not yet clear who will become agriculture minister or whether Mr Chester will remain in Cabinet.

    National Farmers' Federation chief executive Tony Mahar would not speculate on likely candidates to replace Mr Joyce, but said the reshuffle was "pretty bloody important".

    "Looking forward, if we're going to be a $100 billion industry, it's got to be somebody that has the capacity and the willingness to go into bat on all of these issues that we know are going to allow us to take that next step," he said.

    Tension on the track

    [Image: custom-image-size-of-rail-line-cutting-t...s-data.jpg]

    The Melbourne-to-Brisbane inland rail line is touted as a nation-building infrastructure project that will bring huge benefits to the bush. But the $10 billion venture won't save all the dying, tiny towns along its route.

    New Nationals deputy leader Bridget McKenzie will be catapulted from the backbench into Cabinet and has been heavily involved in senate inquiries into agriculture issues in the past.

    Senator McKenzie's promotion meant there were three Victorian Nationals in senior positions — which angered some Queenslanders in the party.

    The Nationals lost a seat in Parliament when Ms Nash was disqualified by the High Court, but the party is confident it will retain five cabinet spots in the reshuffle.

    Social Services Minister Christian Porter is tipped to become the attorney-general and regional Liberal Dan Tehan looks set to be promoted to Cabinet.
    Reply
    (12-19-2017, 06:36 AM)Cap\n Wannabe Wrote: From the ABC...(and facebook!)

    Quote:Barnaby Joyce set to become infrastructure minister in Cabinet reshuffle
    By political reporter Lucy Barbour

    Tue 19 Dec 2017, 6:26am

    [Image: 8596246-3x2-340x227.jpg]

    Photo:
    The move will give Mr Joyce control of the inland rail project. (ABC News: Marco Catalano)

    Related Story: Brandis off to London, sparking pre-Christmas Cabinet reshuffle

    Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce is expected to take on the infrastructure portfolio when Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announces his Cabinet reshuffle, as early as today.

    The Nationals leader currently has responsibility for agriculture, but has been eyeing off the infrastructure job for months.

    The move will give him control of the Federal Government's multi-billion-dollar inland rail project.

    Mr Joyce would take the job from Victorian Nationals heavyweight Darren Chester, who has been a strong supporter of same-sex marriage and pushed for more women to take on senior positions in the party.

    It is not yet clear who will become agriculture minister or whether Mr Chester will remain in Cabinet.

    National Farmers' Federation chief executive Tony Mahar would not speculate on likely candidates to replace Mr Joyce, but said the reshuffle was "pretty bloody important".

    "Looking forward, if we're going to be a $100 billion industry, it's got to be somebody that has the capacity and the willingness to go into bat on all of these issues that we know are going to allow us to take that next step," he said.

    Tension on the track

    [Image: custom-image-size-of-rail-line-cutting-t...s-data.jpg]

    The Melbourne-to-Brisbane inland rail line is touted as a nation-building infrastructure project that will bring huge benefits to the bush. But the $10 billion venture won't save all the dying, tiny towns along its route.

    New Nationals deputy leader Bridget McKenzie will be catapulted from the backbench into Cabinet and has been heavily involved in senate inquiries into agriculture issues in the past.

    Senator McKenzie's promotion meant there were three Victorian Nationals in senior positions — which angered some Queenslanders in the party.

    The Nationals lost a seat in Parliament when Ms Nash was disqualified by the High Court, but the party is confident it will retain five cabinet spots in the reshuffle.

    Social Services Minister Christian Porter is tipped to become the attorney-general and regional Liberal Dan Tehan looks set to be promoted to Cabinet.

    & also via the Oz:

    Quote:Conservative Liberals the big winners in Turnbull’s reshuffle

    [Image: 58d4ad7e8524166c7b061bb225bf07d0?width=650]
    Christian Porter will replace George Brandis as attorney-general. Picture: Kym Smith

    ...Nationals leader and Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce will, as revealed by The Australian, take over the critical transport and infrastructure portfolios from Victorian Nationals MP Darren Chester in an attempt to boost the government’s stocks in regional Australia.

    There was speculation last night that Mr Chester would be dumped from cabinet by Mr Joyce to make way for another Nationals MP, with the junior Coalition partner set to retain its quota of five cabinet positions. This would leave Mr Joyce, who has ultimate say over which Nationals MPs go into cabinet, to try to resolve demands by the Queensland Nationals for greater representation...

    Excellent catch Cap'n... Wink  Maybe (or maybe not) MT and BJ have finally realised how much of a liability the 'photogenic filter' 6D AGAD Chester truly is?

    While on the subject of deckchair shuffles on the HMAS (Titanic) Turnbull I note that yesterday, with the standard no fanfare for matters aviation safety, 6D AGAD put out this presser... Rolleyes

    Quote:Key Appointments to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority
    Media Release
    DC448/2017
    18 December 2017

    • Ms Jane McAloon appointed as new member to the Board of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority
    • Ms Anita Taylor re-appointed to the Board
    • Appointments maintain safety and aviation industry experience on the CASA Board, whilst enhancing governance expertise
    Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester today announced appointments to provide support and stability to the operations of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).

    Mr Chester said the appointment of Ms Jane McAloon as a Board member will bring a wealth of relevant Board and governance experience to the role, including working in regulated industries in the public and private sector in transport and infrastructure.

    Ms Anita Taylor's re-appointment will retain general aviation industry and financial management experience on the Board including in her capacity as Chair of the Board Audit Committee.

    “These appointments will support critical reforms underway at CASA, and completion of the remaining parts of CASA's regulatory reform program,” Mr Chester said.

    “A further Board member with aviation experience is also expected to be announced early in 2018.

    “I would like to thank Mr Ian Smith AM and Mr Murray Warfield for their valuable contribution to the CASA Board over the past three years.

    “I look forward to the Board continuing to set the strategic direction of CASA, while also working with the diverse aviation sector to maintain Australia's strong safety record,” Mr Chester said.

    More information about the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is available at www.casa.gov.au.
      
    No idea what it all means, other than hopefully the last hurrah for Chester, but for those interested here is a short BIO for Ms Jane McAloon:

    Quote:Ms Jane F. McAloon - BEc (Hons), LLB, GDipGov, FAICD, FCIS Jane brings a wealth of commercial experience from her work in highly regulated industries including rail, energy, infrastructure and resources sectors. In her executive career, Jane held senior executive positions at BHP Billiton and AGL, as well as in NSW State Government.

    Current Directorships:
    • Director: EnergyAustralia Holdings Limited (from 2012)
    • Member: Monash University Industry Council of Advisers (from 2014)
    • Member: Referendum Council (from 2015)
    • Director: Australian Defence Force Assistance Trust (from 2015)
    • Director: Cosgate Ltd (from 2017)
    • National Chair: Defence Reserves Support Council (from 2017)
    [size=undefined][size=undefined]
    [b]Former Directorships include[/b][/size][/size]
    • Member: Australian War Memorial Council (2011 – 2014)
    • Member: Australian Corporations and Markets Advisory Committee (2011 – 2013)

    [Image: DRWr7Y1UMAA3MPC.jpg]


    MTF...P2 Cool
    Reply
    Lights, camera – Um - action?

    Sunday is always (nearly) ‘admin’ day for AP; tidy up session and filing. Not often I look forward to doing the necessary, I begrudge the time but needs must etc. On Sunday the shameful saga of Daren 6D-AGAD will be rightfully consigned to the Hall of Shame, where it truly belongs. The Chester ‘era’ will forever be known as one of the most shameful, destructive, deceitful useless periods in the long, sad, sorry history of ministerial ineptitude in relation to matters aeronautical. I don’t understand how he dare show his face in public. Anyway – he’s gone; a gentle riddance.  


    A gentle riddance. Draw the curtains, go.
    Let all of his complexion choose me so.

    And so; we enter the Barnaby era

    There was ease in Casey's manner as he stepped into his place;
    there was pride in Casey's bearing and a smile on Casey's face.
    And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
    no stranger in the crowd could doubt 'twas Casey at the bat

    The opening line to the poem ‘Casey at the bat’ (Thayer) “The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day;” seems somewhat prophetic for the aviation industry, the team in all kinds of bother and all hope pinned on ‘Casey’. But Joyce has available to him the same tools Chester had; we must hope he has the good sense to use them, properly and intelligently. Joyce has an excellent, united, educated RRAT committee which can provide intelligent briefing and sound advice. Joyce has available to him Sen. David Fawcett and the Rev. Forsyth, both of whom are excellent, far seeing, honest men. Should Joyce win industry confidence then he will be positioned to be one of the best ‘ministers’ in the history of aviation.

    The big question is will he use the tools available or will he simply slip into the lazy ways of his predecessor and follow the slippery advice of snake oil salesmen, charlatans and ‘quack’ doctors? All to play for. Joyce is going to be a busy man – he will need good advice, there are only two taps at the bar; only one provides sparkling ale. Your shout minister – choose your poison..

    Toot toot.
    Reply
    There are posts which are worthy of cribbing – then, there are posts which, in a nutshell, say all that needs to be said. Lead Sled, at cobbed throttle; spot on:-

    Sunfish. This is one time I am going to have to disagree with you, and I am speaking from the point of view of "being there". As "on the spot", "in the room" (or wherever we were), often with the only notes taken by the Minister and/or me, or a colleague with me.

    Both Sharp and Vaile set things up so the real decisions were made without the "benefit" of set-piece formal meeting with "industry", the basic program was set before the end 1996 elections. Look up "Soaring into Tomorrow.

    Interestingly, John Anderson followed the same pattern, with a "big bang" shakeup of CASA planned, but he got blown out of the water by OPM&C politics, John Howard got cold feet, even though Kim Beazley supported the plan, he had no time for CASA either, based on his Ministerial experiences.

    I have a far better opinion of Anderson as a Minister than most, because I know what he wanted to do would have sorted the CASA KULTCHA once and for all --- essentially a "scorched earth" and start again approach.

    Interestingly Martin Ferguson, and principal and aviation advisors agreed, that the problems in CASA were so intractable and so entrenched, that anything less drastic would fail. How do I know, because I discussed the matter at length with them.

    And look where we are, all these years later!!

    Tootle pip!

    John Sharp is running rings around ‘the system’ – could not beat it, so now he exploits it. Lessons learnt; well done that man.
    Reply


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