The Carmody Hour.
#76
The Iron Ring back in control at CASA HQ - Dodgy

From recent evidence in Senate Estimates it would appear that despite being demoted the Hoodoo Voodoo Dr Aleck is again in ascendancy at Aviation House and has once more managed to bring a sitting DAS under his spell - Dear God SOS!... Confused

Example:





The following should give Comardy Capers food for thought on whether it is a wise decision to trust the objectivity and unbiased independence of his silky smooth, word weasel legalese speaking Senior Counsel... Dodgy  

Chasing a thread down, for my current Aunty assigned research project, I was led back to the PelAir Senate Inquiry Submissions page: https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Bus...ubmissions

While digging around ( Big Grin ) I happened to note that there was an updated link for a past CASA correspondence to the committee from former (Ag at the time) DAS Terry Farquharson... Huh

Quote:20 Correspondence from CASA to committee clarifying statements made at 15 February 2013 hearing, received 26 April 2013;(PDF 7464KB)
 
Hint: Where it says 'CASA determines' replace with 'Dr Aleck determines'  Rolleyes :


[Image: Dr-A-1.jpg]

[Image: Dr-A-2.jpg]


[Image: Dr-A-3.jpg]


Now although this bizarre OTT correspondence was signed by the former Golden West mafia boss, it becomes quite obvious that this was originally drafted by the resident Iron Ring King-pin and narcissistic Psychopath Dr A. - UDB... Dodgy







[Image: Dr-A.jpg]

MTF...P2 Cool

P7 : (butting in) - Gold star; choc frog and a Tim Tam P2 - nailed down rock solid.
Reply
#77
Most enlightening research thank you gentlemen, the ice is thinning.
Question; were the alterations made? Or, put another way did they fall for it?
Reply
#78
EYE OF NEWT AND A BEARD HAIR FROM THE DOCTOR.....

The Voodoo cauldron of magic potions is alive and well. The little man sits in his Cant’berra office busily mixing together magic potions to razzle dazzle the inept, incompetent and downright stupid. A splash of doctored documents here, a slight of hand manoeuvre to change a date there, some weasel words and a furrowed brow during Senate estimates and whoosh! The trick has been completed. Hell, I wouldn’t be surprised if Dr Aleck had the ability to summon the ghost of mi mi mi Beaker Dolan out of the bowels of Can’tberra and back into the spotlight! He speaketh utter shit. Nothing short of a load of old cobblers and mi mi mi.

Aviation buyer beware - do not buy a used plane from Dr Voodoo.

TICK TOCK
Reply
#79
JetGo enters voluntary administration, cancels all regional flights amid legal battle

R.I.P JetGo. Another airline folds amid a tough operating environment.

Link below; (P2 might be able to tidy up)

https://www.google.com.au/amp/amp.abc.ne...le/9825166

Quote:JetGo enters voluntary administration, cancels all regional flights amid legal battle
ABC Illawarra 
By Gavin Coote and Nick McLaren

Updated yesterday at 4:32pm
[Image: 9825272-3x2-340x227.jpg]

PHOTO: JetGo has gone into voluntary administration. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)
RELATED STORY: JETGO Albury-Brisbane flights to take off
RELATED STORY: Dubbo set to get direct flights to Melbourne
RELATED STORY: Airline may consider Rockhampton-Sydney direct flights

Regional commercial airliner JetGo has gone into voluntary administration, prompting it to cancel flights across the country.
The company appointed administrators on Friday and said all regular passenger transport services had been suspended.

JetGo services many cities across regional Australia including Wollongong, Dubbo, Wagga Wagga, Albury, Rockhampton, Townsville and Karratha.
In a statement, the company said the administrators were "assessing the viability of the future operations" and it would continue limited charter operations.

It comes after the Dubbo Regional Council in western New South Wales lodged a claim in the Supreme Court, requesting the company be wound up over unpaid debts.

At the time, JetGo said the newly-merged council in Dubbo had reneged on a previous agreement to waive taxes as part of an incentive agreement.

More councils owed money

The news has shocked the Illawarra region, which did not have a commercial air service until JetGo began running local flights to Brisbane and Melbourne last year.

The Shellharbour City Council, which owns the Illawarra Regional Airport, said it had immediately ended its "service level agreement" with the company.
Shellharbour Mayor Marianne Saliba said she felt for those who had booked flights, but urged them to contact their bank or credit card company.

Quote:
"I'd say that your credit card company would be where I would start to find out reimbursement for the costs," Cr Saliba said.

"I think it's really sad that people are in this position and it's very disappointing, but it's completely out of Council's hands in that this was a business decision made by a private business."

Cr Saliba said the Illawarra to Essendon route was JetGo's busiest and highlighted the need to maintain the service.

She added the Council is also owed money by the company and it would work to recoup the debt.

"What we would like to do is try and ensure those services continue," she said.

Quote:
"We'll continue to work with JetGo and other airlines to find a suitable service provider."

In a statement, Townsville Airport chief operating officer Kevin Gill said he was disappointed with the news.

"We worked with JetGo in recent months in an effort to assist the service to continue," the statement read.

"JetGo has been a valued partner of Townsville Airport since commencing services to and from Townsville in September 2015."

A hearing will be held in the Supreme Court on June 18 as part of Dubbo Regional Council's legal action against Jetgo.

In a statement, the council said it was owed more than $270,000 and that it had "acted responsibly" to recover ratepayers' money.

Dubbo Regional Council's statement said,

Quote:Council's legal actions seeking to recover that debt on behalf of the Dubbo regional community followed months of ongoing direct negotiations with Jetgo.

Hotline set up for affected passengers

One of the appointed administrators, Jonathan Mcleod, has written to affected customers echoing suggestions that they contact their credit card provider.
Mr Mcleod told the ABC only two of the fleet of six jets were flying prior to his appointment, and that 4,045 passengers would be affected over the month of June.

Qantas has set up a hotline number — 1300 659 116 — for affected passengers to assist with cancelled flights and other flight options.

P2 edit - Since we're on a bit of a Queen's greatest lately Tongue :





Perhaps this should be Wingnut Carmody's new mantra... Angel RIP JetGo  Undecided
Reply
#80
(06-01-2018, 05:48 PM)Gobbledock Wrote: JetGo enters voluntary administration, cancels all regional flights amid legal battle

R.I.P JetGo. Another airline folds amid a tough operating environment.

Link below; (P2 might be able to tidy up)

https://www.google.com.au/amp/amp.abc.ne...le/9825166

Quote:JetGo enters voluntary administration, cancels all regional flights amid legal battle
ABC Illawarra 
By Gavin Coote and Nick McLaren

Updated yesterday at 4:32pm
[Image: 9825272-3x2-340x227.jpg]

PHOTO: JetGo has gone into voluntary administration. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)
RELATED STORY: JETGO Albury-Brisbane flights to take off
RELATED STORY: Dubbo set to get direct flights to Melbourne
RELATED STORY: Airline may consider Rockhampton-Sydney direct flights

Regional commercial airliner JetGo has gone into voluntary administration, prompting it to cancel flights across the country.
The company appointed administrators on Friday and said all regular passenger transport services had been suspended.

JetGo services many cities across regional Australia including Wollongong, Dubbo, Wagga Wagga, Albury, Rockhampton, Townsville and Karratha.
In a statement, the company said the administrators were "assessing the viability of the future operations" and it would continue limited charter operations.

It comes after the Dubbo Regional Council in western New South Wales lodged a claim in the Supreme Court, requesting the company be wound up over unpaid debts.

At the time, JetGo said the newly-merged council in Dubbo had reneged on a previous agreement to waive taxes as part of an incentive agreement.

More councils owed money

The news has shocked the Illawarra region, which did not have a commercial air service until JetGo began running local flights to Brisbane and Melbourne last year.

The Shellharbour City Council, which owns the Illawarra Regional Airport, said it had immediately ended its "service level agreement" with the company.
Shellharbour Mayor Marianne Saliba said she felt for those who had booked flights, but urged them to contact their bank or credit card company.

Quote:
"I'd say that your credit card company would be where I would start to find out reimbursement for the costs," Cr Saliba said.

"I think it's really sad that people are in this position and it's very disappointing, but it's completely out of Council's hands in that this was a business decision made by a private business."

Cr Saliba said the Illawarra to Essendon route was JetGo's busiest and highlighted the need to maintain the service.

She added the Council is also owed money by the company and it would work to recoup the debt.

"What we would like to do is try and ensure those services continue," she said.

Quote:
"We'll continue to work with JetGo and other airlines to find a suitable service provider."

In a statement, Townsville Airport chief operating officer Kevin Gill said he was disappointed with the news.

"We worked with JetGo in recent months in an effort to assist the service to continue," the statement read.

"JetGo has been a valued partner of Townsville Airport since commencing services to and from Townsville in September 2015."

A hearing will be held in the Supreme Court on June 18 as part of Dubbo Regional Council's legal action against Jetgo.

In a statement, the council said it was owed more than $270,000 and that it had "acted responsibly" to recover ratepayers' money.

Dubbo Regional Council's statement said,

Quote:Council's legal actions seeking to recover that debt on behalf of the Dubbo regional community followed months of ongoing direct negotiations with Jetgo.

Hotline set up for affected passengers

One of the appointed administrators, Jonathan Mcleod, has written to affected customers echoing suggestions that they contact their credit card provider.
Mr Mcleod told the ABC only two of the fleet of six jets were flying prior to his appointment, and that 4,045 passengers would be affected over the month of June.

Qantas has set up a hotline number — 1300 659 116 — for affected passengers to assist with cancelled flights and other flight options.

P2 edit - Since we're on a bit of a Queen's greatest lately Tongue :





Perhaps this should be Wingnut Carmody's new mantra... Angel RIP JetGo  Undecided

Quoting from this Airports thread post: Airports & A4ANZ wars continue

Quote:"...Last year, ICAO, the United Nations’ global civil aviation organisation, made recommendations to governments around the world, urging them to maximise the benefits of aviation for all stakeholders.

Australia has been a global role model in heeding this call, with a regulatory framework that encourages airport investment..."

&..

"...Our CEO, Dr Alison Roberts, will participate in a panel discussion on airport privatisation, sharing insights into how the current regulatory environment is holding our region back..."

As a matter of interest, I am in the process of reviewing the latest BOLLOCKS, Dr Hoodoo Voodoo Aleck, notified differences to ICAO: https://www.airservicesaustralia.com/aip...18-h44.pdf  

If you want to get a sense of how our uniquely Australian regulatory framework/environment/red tape can impact on smaller Aussie operators by greatly increasing costs through unnecessary red tape imposts, that make it harder to compete against bigger operators and regional/international airlines, then go no further than reviewing the 46 pages of Annex 6 Part I, Part II & Part III 

Now compare that to one of our regional neighbours Singapore with their less than 1 page of NDs listed in the Singaporean CAAS A5 AIP GEN 1.7:  https://www.caas.gov.sg/docs/default-sou...1feb18.pdf

Quote:ANNEX 6 Operation of Aircraft

Part I (International Commercial Air Transport - Aeroplanes) - 9th edition
Chapter 6 (Amendment 34)

All aeroplanes of a MTWA of over 5700kg, regardless of the date that their
individual certificate of airworthiness is first issued, shall be equipped with a
Type I FDR.
6.3.1.2.3
6.3.1.2.4 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part I paragraph 6.3.1.2.3.
6.3.1.2.6 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part I paragraph 6.3.1.2.3.
6.3.1.2.9 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part I paragraph 6.3.1.2.3.
6.3.1.3.3 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part I paragraph 6.3.1.2.3.
6.3.2.1.3 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part I paragraph 6.3.1.2.3.
6.3.2.1.4 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part I paragraph 6.3.1.2.3.
Chapter 12 (Amendment 34)
Singapore regulations do not require all cabin crew to be trained on the use of
automated external defibrillator (AED). However, the regulations require that at
least one senior cabin crew on board every aircraft carrying AED to be trained
on the use of AED.
12.4(b)

Part II (International General Aviation - Aeroplanes) - 8th edition
Chapter 3 (Amendment 29)

All aeroplanes of a MTWA of over 5700kg, regardless of the date that their
individual certificate of airworthiness is first issued, shall be equipped with a
Type I FDR.
3.6.3.1.2.2
3.6.3.1.3.3 Currently, the use of analogue FDRs using FM is not permitted.
All aeroplanes of a MTWA of over 5700kg, regardless of the date that their
individual certificate of airworthiness is first issued, shall be equipped with a
CVR.
3.6.3.2.1.3
Chapter 6 (Amendment 29)
General aviation aircraft in Singapore are required to be registered in the Public
Transport Category.
6.1.1

Part III (International Operations - Helicopters) - 7th edition
Chapter 4 (Amendment 15)

All helicopters of a MTWA of over 3180kg (adopting ICAO recommendation of
ANNEX 6 Part III paragraph 4.3.2.1.2), instead of 7000kg, are required to be
equipped with a CVR.
4.3.2.1.1
4.3.2.1.3 As above for ICAO ANNEX 6 Part III paragraph 4.3.2.1.1.

- Just saying  Rolleyes


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#81
More on the demise of JetGo -  Confused

Via the Northern Daily Leader:

Quote:JUNE 13 2018 - 3:26PM
JetGo in debt up to $32m, thousands owed flight refunds
  • Kate McIlwain


[Image: r0_276_5184_3456_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg]

Ailing regional airline JetGo could have potential debt of up to $32 million, according to Shellharbour City Council staff who attended the company’s first creditors meeting.

Held on Wednesday morning in Brisbane, the three and a half hour meeting was attended by about 100 people with a number of other creditors – including Shelharbour and other councils, and the Australian Taxation Office – phoning in.

In a summary put together by Shellharbour’s general manger Carey McIntyre and the council’s governance manager, the council reported that JetGo had “confirmed total exposure is $17 million, with a potential total exposure of $32 million”.

Read more: Shellharbour council owed $149k in passenger fees by JetGo

They also said 10,000 customers were owed money, along with 200 unsecured creditors, 12 secured creditors and 112 employees. 

JetGo listed its assets as four aircraft, office equipment, assets at airports, two vehicles, and stock. 

The Air Operating Certificate, which is granted by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and gives permission to conduct commercial activities, was JetGo’s biggest asset, the council said.

Administrators are working to secure these assets.

After weeks of rumours about the airline’s cash shortages and debts – and court action from Dubbo Regional Council which requested the compnay to be wound up – Jetgo announced it would go into voluntary administration on June 1.

It immediately suspended all passenger flights, including those operating to Melbourne and Brisbane from the Illawarra Regional Airport.

At the time, managing director Paul Bredereck told the Mercury that he hoped the administration period would be “a temporary measure”.

Shellharbour council says it is owed about $420,000 in passenger taxes and unpaid security costs.

After Wednesday’s meeting, the council also reported that four parties expressed interest in putting together a proposal to take over JetGo.

Shellharbour council nominated to be a part of a committee of creditors which represents the interest of other parties owed money, however this nomination was not successful.

The next report from the administrators is due on June 27, with a second creditors’ meeting convened on July 6.

At this meeting, all creditors will vote either for liquidation of JetGo or deed of company administration.
Illawarra Mercury



MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
#82
Hmmm...how naive are the council scavengers err....creditors.

The AOC is the biggest asset???

Has anyone told them the AOC is not worth the paper its printed on? It's
actually a liability. The costs of reassigning an AOC can be almost as much
as obtaining one in the first place, then there's no guarantee CAsA would
deem anyone who tried "Fit and Proper". Ya pays Ya money and takes ya chances.
Reply
#83
Agree with Thorny, an AOC is worth jackshit. You spend a tonne of money obtaining it and then you spend a tonne of money keeping it, all the while knowing that Fort Fumble can shred it at the blink of an eye. It’s not like buying a taxi lisense, but then again they used to be an investment until the Government green lighted Uber in the blink of an eye and sent hundreds of owner/drivers bankrupt or left them with million dollar lisenses now worth $80k. Assholes. And CAsA don’t give a crap about cost because it’s all taxpayer money so to them who gives a shit.

As for Councils being owed $200k to $470k, DONT blame JetGo, blame your local dickhead Council CEO, CFO and Finance department for allowing a pissy little airline to rack up such a large bill. That would have taken ages to accumulate. That’s poor Council management. The local councillors should kick the Council management teams ass. More taxpayer money written off.

Old mate Bredereck has put on about 30kgs in the past year, must have been eating all the profits! And I would love to see Ryder, Trevor Jensen and the Screaming Skull all in the same cockpit. Imagine that!!!!

‘Unprofitable skies for all’
Reply
#84
Latest on JetGoneConfused

Via the other Aunty today:

Quote:Regional flights in state of 'crisis': calls for government to step in over JetGo woes
ABC Western Plains 
By Lucy Thackray and Chloe Hart

Updated 56 minutes ago
[Image: 9882384-3x2-340x227.jpg]
PHOTO: When regional airline carrier JetGo went into administration, it left thousands of ticketholders out of pocket and without a local carrier. (ABC Western Plains: Nick Lowther)

There are calls for the New South Wales Government to subsidise regional airline services, with the voluntary administration of carrier JetGo Australia this month leaving regional communities without direct flights to some capital cities.

Key points
  • Regional airline JetGo Australia owes $17 million, with a potential debt of $34 million, and is facing action at the Supreme Court
  • More than 10 thousand passengers are pursuing refunds through the banks, with a total ticket value of $4 million
  • Doctor may be leaving western New South Wales town because of loss of airline
In late May Dubbo Regional Council lodged legal action against JetGo Australia in the Supreme Court over more than $270,000 owed by the airline in unpaid fees.

All flights were then cancelled on June 1, leaving more than 10,000 customers pursuing $4 million in refunds.

The full extent of the regional airline's debt was revealed at a creditors' meeting last week to be a confirmed $17 million, but is potentially higher.

JetGo Australia operated flights from regional locations including Dubbo, Wollongong and Albury in NSW; Townsville and Rockhampton in Queensland; and Karratha in Western Australia.

It is the only airline which connects these regional destinations with Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Melbourne.

[Image: 4976736-3x2-340x227.jpg]

PHOTO: Dubbo Regional Council has lodged a claim with the Supreme Court over unpaid debts from JetGo.(Supplied: Dubbo City Council)


Doctors to regional towns

Rochana Chandraratne is a Brisbane-based doctor who has been working in Warren, north-west of Dubbo in NSW, as a locum doctor for three years.

Dr Chandraratne uses JetGo to fly from Brisbane to Dubbo for work.

"I work as a GP there and also I look after the hospital as an on-call GP," said Dr Chandraratne.

"There are another two doctors in the area and both of them are travelling.
"One commutes from Sydney and the other from Dubbo."

Although Dr Chandraratne loves his work in Warren, he said without a direct route between Brisbane and Dubbo, he might have to find work elsewhere.

"It is really difficult coming to Sydney from Brisbane," said Dr Chandraratne.
"Those flights are always fully booked and then after that from Sydney you have to wait another hour to catch the flight to Dubbo.

Quote:
"If I'm given another choice to work in another location where there's a direct flight, I'll consider that because taking two flights is a tiresome thing and more expensive as well.

"If JetGo can resume their service it would be wonderful."

Calls for government to help

The Regional Aviation Association of Australia (RAAA) said there needed to be more support from the NSW Government for regional airlines.

Chief executive Mike Higgins said it was very hard for regional airlines to make a profit.

[Image: 9825272-3x2-340x227.jpg]

PHOTO: A Jetgo plane at Illawarra Regional Airport. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)


"A number of our operators are operating on very slim margins due to the long, thin routes that the aircraft fly and the small size of the aircraft," he said.

Mr Higgins said it was difficult for regional flights to be profitable for smaller airlines.

"If you are operating a 737 that Virgin or Qantas operate, passenger numbers plus or minus 15 or 20 really doesn't make much difference," Mr Higgins said.

"But on our operators' sized aircraft, one or two passengers can make a difference of operating at a loss or making ends meet.

Quote:
"To survive, we need high load factors; that is, the aircraft need to be almost full, if not full, on every flight.

"In terms of financial support I think the Queensland Government sets the benchmark [by] providing subsidies to routes through remote communities.

"I would encourage other state governments to engage with the Queensland Government to see the kind of benefits that sort of investment can provide."

Assistance for passengers

Qantas has offered special fares for customers who are JetGo ticketholders and were booked to travel in the month of June.

A spokesperson for the airline says hundreds of people have already used their special fare to book replacement tickets.

"The fares are available up to June 30 because that is how long JetGo said they would be in administration for," the spokesman said.

"If it continues, obviously we'd look at what we can do."
MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#85
JetGo liquidated; RossAir calls in administrators -  Confused  

Via ABC News:

Quote:JetGo forced to liquidate as Dubbo council wins Supreme Court case over unpaid debts
ABC Western Plains 
By Claudia Jambor and Karen Michelmore

Updated about 11 hours ago
[Image: 9825272-3x2-340x227.jpg]
PHOTO: JetGo may appeal the Supreme Court's decision, a former executive says. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)
RELATED STORY: Regional airline JetGo enters voluntary administration, cancels all flights
RELATED STORY: Airline may consider Rockhampton-Sydney direct flights
RELATED STORY: Dubbo set to get direct flights to Melbourne

Regional airline JetGo will be liquidated after a western New South Wales council was successful in its application in the Supreme Court today to wind up the company.

JetGo serviced cities across regional Australia including Wollongong, Dubbo, Wagga Wagga, Albury, Rockhampton, Townsville, and Karratha.
The company entered voluntary administration on June 1 and grounded all passenger flights.

The council's court action began before the directors of JetGo appointed voluntary administrators.

In a statement to the ABC, Dubbo Regional Council said legal action had been necessary because it was owed "significant outstanding fees" by JetGo and due to "the absence of any realistic proposal for payment".

"Dubbo Regional Council acted in the best interests of our community in this process and will continue to focus on stabilising airline services for our regional community," the council said.

"Unfortunately our community, along with many other communities and businesses, have been financially impacted by this business failure."

Company 'could have continued'

Former JetGo executive Paul Bredereck said the company was working through its financial issues and he was confident the services could have continued under another interested party.

He flagged an appeal of the court decision was being considered, and accused Dubbo Regional Council's legal action as having "vexatious intent".

"My initial response is a little bit dumbfounded as to why the application would be granted seeing as though it's going to significantly disadvantage the creditors," Mr Bredereck said.

"They don't give a sh**t about getting a better return for the creditors."
The successful wind-up application comes a day before thousands of JetGo creditors were set to vote on whether to liquidate the airline.

Despite the administrator recommending liquidation, Mr Bredereck said Dubbo Regional Council's actions had robbed the other creditors of their say in JetGo's future.

Quote:
"They [Dubbo Regional Council] want this buried, done, dusted. They've got their own liquidator appointed. That's the height of arrogance," Mr Bredereck said.

"Why should the other creditors not get a vote and say who the liquidator is if a liquidator is going to be appointed?"

Focus turns to flights for regional Australia

Shellharbour City Council in the Illawarra region is among the councils that have lost flights and are owed money.

But the council's deputy mayor Kellie Marsh said she felt no animosity towards Dubbo Regional Council.

"The situation is how it is and Dubbo have made the move they have, and for right or for wrong that's what we have to run with now," Cr Marsh said.

Her main focus now was ensuring JetGo's flight services for the Shellharbour and regional Australia could be replaced.

"The need in regional Australia for regular passenger transport is certainly there," Cr Marsh said.

"I hope this isn't a sign of things to come."

Impact of decision felt across the country

In the Western Australian Pilbara region, the City of Karratha said it faced up to $850,000 in losses that it is unlikely to recoup.

JetGo had been due to start flights between Karratha and Brisbane this month, with flights to Singapore due later in the year.

In a statement, the City of Karratha said it had spent $848,763 on sponsorship installments with JetGo, to help the company prepare for the start of the new service, including pilot training, recruitment, progressing regulatory approvals, aircraft leasing, fit-out, and livery.

The council has registered as a creditor with the administrators, but it had been advised that if JetGo went into administration "the City is unlikely to recoup any costs as the City is not a secured creditor".

It said all passengers who had been booked on flights with JetGo had been advised that the services have been cancelled.

Passengers are urged to contact their financial institution to seek reimbursement of the ticket price.

City of Karratha Deputy Mayor Grant Cucel said the council remained committed to improving travel options from Karratha.

"We will continue to work with JetGo's administrators and the appointed liquidation officer to pursue our options to recoup any costs incurred, but we have been advised that this may be unlikely," he said in a statement.

"Costs incurred in trying to facilitate these services will not impact property rates or future budgets."

And from the Oz yesterday:

Quote:Headwinds force Rossair into administration

[Image: c6e3ff7dfaf0adef62dc05dddb8dd151]ANNABEL HEPWORTH
Adelaide-based Rossair yesterday announced it had gone into voluntary administration after months of “extreme adversities”.


The economics of the airline charter market are being closely watched after Adelaide-based Rossair yesterday announced it had gone into voluntary administration after months of “extreme adversities” stemming from a fatal crash last year.

Citing “several significant, external challenges”, AE Charter — whose businesses include Rossair Charter — said the board and management would help administrators in a bid to “investigate and pursue strategies to retain the value for all stakeholders”.

A statement yesterday pointed to “more than 12 months faced with extreme adversities” stemming from last year’s plane crash near Renmark Airport that left three people dead.

The “recent challenges have brought high levels of uncertainty and material costs”, a Rossair spokesman said.

Adelaide Airport managing ­director Mark Young said they are “concerned for the future of Rossair, which has played an important role in South Australia’s aviation history”. Rossair is based at Adelaide Airport.

“We will work with Rossair’s team and the administrator through this difficult and uncertain time,” Mr Young said.

Rico Merkert, an aviation expert at the University of Sydney Business School, said it was sad to see Australia’s second-oldest air transport company going into ­voluntary administration.

Whether issues like airlines not flying and operating costs, such as a rise in fuel price, were a “decisive driver” for upward pressure on fares remained to be seen, but “the direction seems to be clear”, he said.

South Australia Regional Development Minister Tim Whetstone yesterday told ABC Radio that it was “now up to Rossair to look at ways that someone could come in and rebuild Rossair or whether we have to introduce a new airline to provide a very valuable service to regional South Australia”.

Yesterday’s statement from Rossair said limited non-flying ­activities would continue while ­efforts were made “to put the business on a sustainable footing for the future”.

Ernst & Young partner Henry Kazar and director Lachlan ­Abbott have been appointed as administrators of AE Charter and Rossair Charter.

The move came despite Rossair last year striking an agreement with Essendon-based AusJet for a joint venture in the South Australian market.

Professor Merkert said the situation with airlines going into voluntary administration highlighted the challenges of running those kinds of operations.

Ben Wyndham, Airspeed Aviation managing director, said there was an increasing regulatory complexity facing the sector.



MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
#86
A little more of AOPA logic from Shawn Kelly (director).  A 'change' in culture has been a long wished for item. Probably from both sides; however, (IMO) until the threat of a liability matter, being raised against  CASA is removed, it seems to me CASA is hidebound: locked within the toils of their own legal knitting. It is terms like 'CASA must be satisfied' which create the second edge to the knife. If the approval legislation was 'un-ravelled' to a simple USA style system where if you have (A), (B), ©, and (D) you're good to go pay the fee and get on with it, CASA would benefit. But because of the legalese, mumbo-jumbo and arse covering built into the rules, an approval becomes a legal minefield.  That said - Shawn makes a valuable, reasoned comparison analysis, which heralds the way forward for the AOPA efforts to make life just a little better for the aviation community.    


Quote:> Subject: Re: Another example of CASA regulation making things VERY difficult.
>
> It might have, but I’m a bit skeptical. Keep in mind that CASA proactively and aggressively pursued this. I think that the bigger problem is that the overall mindset is that they are a police agency and we are a bunch of shady characters that are always trying to get away with something.
>
> Unless we can somehow change the culture at CASA, I don’t see much improvement, and I think that that is a very big project. No impossible, but certainly a big project.
>
> I AM, however, convinced that a change of the basic underlying regulations to the American system would yield very positive results. If we were allowed to do anything that wasn’t prohibited I think that it would change the power dynamic. Even though it seems like a simple difference in semantics, it I think that there is a a very real, if subtle, difference in the perception of power. The individual is the one with the rights, and those rights cannot be usurped unless there is a specific rule that allows them to be. Plus, it allows for more flexibility and less cost.
>
> Ben told me something the other day that’s an incredibly powerful argument in favour of the American system. There are as many GA aircraft movements in Southern California in one day as there are in Australia in a year.
>
> Think about that!
>
> Having flown quite a bit in Southern California, I can believe it. And most of that flying is taking place in the smog in the Los Angeles Basin. Going into the sun, visibility is very limited. Most of the time you are flying over densely populated city with few if any acceptable emergency landing spots. And yet, they have a safety record equal to or better than ours.
>
> Adopting that system would involve trusting individuals to be competent and to do the right thing. It would involve a lot of people in CASA giving up a lot of power. And would probably result in a reduced number of bureaucrats. I think that makes it a bit of an uphill battle.
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#87
Industry fears more red tape burden on Part 135? Confused  

Via the Oz:

Quote:Fears of more charter red tape
[Image: c6743b9ce3f5904cdd6aa8eba77a2838]ANNABEL HEPWORTH
The nation’s civil aviation regulator is being urged against adding to crippling red tape and costs to small air charter operators.

Small aviation chart operators fear more red tape

The nation’s civil aviation regulator is being urged against adding to crippling red tape and costs to small air charter operators when it releases new rules for smaller aeroplanes.

In the wake of this week’s summit on the embattled general aviation sector in Wagga Wagga, the sector has launched a pre-emptive strike over new “part 135” rules that the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is expected to release in draft form next month for broad consultation.

The rules will be aimed at setting minimum standards for small planes conducting air transport operations, capturing both charter and regular public transport operations.

Some have fears that the rules and associated maintenance regulations could prove too complicated for smaller and remote operations, although CASA insists the proposed changes would decrease red tape “over time”.

There has been consultation so far through the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and its technical working group, though this is still in progress.

It is understood the content of the draft to be released for consultation is still not settled.

Ben Wyndham, Airspeed Aviation managing director, said he worried that the new rules would mandate the employment of safety managers and prevent the business owner or chief executive filling the key roles of safety manager and chief pilot.

“This adds $100,000 to $200,000 to our payroll each year and is simply anti-small business,” Mr Wyndham said.

However, a CASA spokesman said the role of safety manager “could be met in a number of ways and may not require ­additional resources in an ­organisation”.

“Consultation already conducted during the drafting of the proposed rules has suggested it is appropriate for all air transport operators to have a safety management system,” he said.

“The key point is that safety management systems will be scaled to match the size of the ­operator … CASA will not require small air transport operators to have the same complex safety management systems as large airlines.”

Another crucial issue is the level of maintenance CASA insists on. Mr Wyndham said that regulating charter operations the same as regular public transport operations could lead to a need to use more expensive maintenance outfits. This could lead to “more administration and staff and costs,” he said.

Stuart Burns, chief executive and chief pilot at Complete Aviation, which runs charter aircraft, was concerned that another set of rules for large aeroplanes, being made together with part 135, would affect current operators of various light aircraft, impose extra costs and require more crew.

Mr Burns said this was at a time when there was a shortage of skilled pilots and competition from road transport.

But the CASA spokesman said the proposed changes “provide for an increased number of outcome-based rules that will lower red tape over time”.

Rick Pegus, a pilot and man­aging director of Navair, said part 135 could create opportunities for smaller operators to conduct scheduled flights, selling seats “which might open up some opportunities in certain areas”.

“It could be potentially good for small country towns that currently don’t have any services,” Mr Pegus said.

But he noted that it “could also create a revolving door of operators going broke trying to establish these types of opportunities without any real experience in this new style of business”.




& a comment from Sandy:

Quote:..CASA has a 30 year record of talking the talk, a remarkable history of stating unequivocally that it is working to reduce red tape for General Aviation (GA). Problem is that one step forward and ten backwards has resulted in the closure of hundreds of flying schools and more closures of the few struggling GA schools and smaller charter firms still operating will occur. Thousands of jobs have also been lost in aircraft maintenance and the pathways for aircraft engineering apprentices have been steadily truncated. There are now no appropriate courses in Melbourne so one apprentice is traveling from north west Victoria through Melbourne to East Gippsland (Sale) for training. You wouldn’t believe we have become so backward. 

The independent regulator is a model of failure, just another Can’tberra fee gouging salary factory. It is churning out impossibly complex rules, a 30 year attempt to rewrite and still not finished. It has migrated its unfinished rules into the criminal code, against the Commonwealth’s own guidelines, and inappropriately framed them as offences of strict liability. It’s CEO, fatuously titled ‘Director of Air Safety,’ receives around $600,000 per annum, considerably more than the Minister who should be in charge. Neither gentleman has any hands on experience of GA. 

Qantas and other airlines used to have plenty of well qualified Australian GA pilots to chose from, now it can’t find them and is fishing around the world to fill it’s cockpits. It is planning to create a local flight school, well good luck Mr. Joyce, the new flying school rules due this August mean the shortage of instructors will increase and your flight school would be well advised to set up in the USA where rational and workable rules are allowing a resurgence of GA activity. Alex in the Rises.. 
MTF...P2  Cool
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