Dick Smith – Master Orator.
#31
The 1989 “CAA” letter of promise is kept above my office desk as a reminder to myself and guests that governments cannot be trusted to keep their words. That is why at times they must be changed, why we citizens must work voluntarily to urge reform, why we use the ballot box, and why the press and publicity are essential.

After 10 years of one step forward (adoption of US Parts 23-35) and many backwards, the 1999 further promise by Dr. Scully-Power that reform is in the offing gives important perspective and goes to the truism that if we do not study history then we are more likely to repeat it.

So here we are 29 years after my CASA-CAA letter when even the government’s own statistics show considerable decline and the GA industry is up in arms, as never before, over the bureaucratic destruction of a valuable industry. A huge failure, the independent regulator, the statutory authority, separated from direct Ministerial control. An experiment of governance that should be truncated as soon as possible.
Reply
#32
(07-07-2018, 08:42 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  

[Image: Chicken-Little-Wallpapers-chicken-little...0-1024.jpg]   

Hitch in anticipation of Wagga Summit... Rolleyes

Via this week's LMH Dodgy :

Quote:...Enabling legislation for Basic Class 2 medical has a sting in the tail: we have to tell passengers that we are flying to a lower medical standard. This brings reminders of the Jabiru engine restrictions when similar demands were made of aircraft owners. The problem as I see it is that it can do nothing but put the frighteners on passengers who didn't know the pilot was subject to a medical standard in the first place. One thing I try to never do is scare people with an aeroplane, and I suspect not even CASA would think that a good idea. The requirement probably stems from the regulator's desire to protect the general public from perceived risk, but in demanding we tell passengers that we're on a lower medical standard is the equivalent of demanding we tell them we're not as safe. Personally, I don't think this is the case at all. It does make me wonder (again) if CASA believes aviation is inherently a dangerous thing to do.

Quote:you need to be a very good political animal or you get re-branded 'collateral damage'

Fun and games are on early next week in Wagga Wagga. The AGAA general aviation summit has managed to attract most of the associations and lobby groups within the community as well as some high-ranking politicians. Inevitably, the politics from the floor has already started well before the opening coffee session. There is a lot at stake here: representatives of both the government and the opposition are saying they will back a change to the Civil Aviation Act 1988, but are asking for consensus from the industry before they take any action. Consequently, those who would seek to influence the change according to their own policies are manoeuvring to get their position best heard. All that's natural, unfortunately; when you get involved in politics you need to be a very good political animal or you get re-branded "collateral damage". As someone who has been bleating about the need for consensus within the industry since I wrote my first ever blog, my largest fear is that this summit will be sidelined by politics and not-so-hidden agendas that will swamp the idea of getting the Act changed and do nothing but demonstrate to the government that we just can't work together. If that happens, federal governments to the end of days will use it as an excuse to do nothing. I seriously hope I am wrong about this.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...bfDwLi0.99

Considering Hitch has been cowering over in the EU for the last month and only 2 days ago  was seemingly shamed into actually mentioning the Wagga Summit, one has to be concerned for the future of Australia's once premier GA magazine? Anyway, a timely counterpoint to that load of codswallop comes in the form of Sandy... Wink


Sandy Reith • 11 hours ago

Hitch; right on the ball re political manoeuvring that will be part and parcel of the Wagga event, against a background of serious resistance from the bureaucratic machine which has much to lose. All those highly paid jobs and Wintertime seminars away from freezing Can’tberra, mostly in QLD, and Northern hemisphere summertime conferences. 


Insofar as the ephemeral “consensus” is concerned, may I suggest that this word can evoke various degrees of relevance depending on individual disposition. One could never, realistically, expect everyone to agree completely so lets look at how Australia deals with this governance issue in the No. 1. arena of politics, where it counts most to aviators, the Parliament of Australia. Here 51% is sufficient to resolve ways of living and enshrine in law the will of the people. Is this consensus? Does it matter? It depends on your viewpoint. Democracy works by resolving conflicting interests. One main principle is that the will of the majority should not impinge on the rights and freedoms of minorities. This goes to our freedoms, one of those is to fly without a myriad of unnecessary costs and impractical rules. 


We should aim to impress Minister MacCormack that action is necessary and urgent.






MTF...P2  Cool


ps If nothing else this week's LMH - combined with the dot's & dashes posts (see - Wagga Summit - Let's not do the 'timewarp again'.) - will have industry participants properly forewarned in the lead up to the Wagga summit. However Sandy also wanted to contribute to the 'eyes wide open' brief and to remind me that the bureaucratic embuggerance of the GA industry has been ongoing for a lot longer than a mere decade... Big Grin 


Quote:[Image: IMG_2317.jpg]

[Image: IMG-2292.jpg]

Sandy:

Quote:The 1989 “CAA” letter of promise is kept above my office desk as a reminder to myself and guests that governments cannot be trusted to keep their words. That is why at times they must be changed, why we citizens must work voluntarily to urge reform, why we use the ballot box, and why the press and publicity are essential. 

After 10 years of one step forward (adoption of US Parts 23-35) and many backwards, the 1999 further promise by Dr. Scully-Power that reform is in the offing gives important perspective and goes to the truism that if we do not study history then we are more likely to repeat it. 

So here we are 29 years after my CASA-CAA letter when even the government’s own statistics show considerable decline and the GA industry is up in arms, as never before, over the bureaucratic destruction of a valuable industry. A huge failure, the independent regulator, the statutory authority, separated from direct Ministerial control. An experiment of governance that should be truncated as soon as possible.

Via the Weekend Oz:

Less red tape for general aviation
[Image: df7e44dde7d7c5f2630ee64fe6a8222a]ANNABEL HEPWORTH

New maintenance rules for the under-pressure general aviation sector will be modelled on the best of leading systems such as the American model, Australia’s aviation safety regulator says.

Ahead of a landmark general aviation summit in Wagga Wagga next week, The Weekend Australiancan reveal Infrastructure and Transport Minister ­Michael McCormack will announce today that the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has started work on the regulations with a stated ­objective of reducing costs and easing the burden of red tape.

The move comes as leaders from major aviation groups prepare to descend on Wagga Wagga, in Mr McCormack’s Riverina electorate, to convince the government to make legislative changes to ease the cost of complying with what they consider excessive regulations.

A new set of maintenance regulations would be tailored to the general aviation industry, which has shrunk significantly since 2010 and complained of being throttled by red tape.

CASA boss Shane Carmody said these would be based as much as they could be on the best practices of “leading” aviation ­nations such as the United States.

General aviation provides connections to areas not serviced by airlines and plays a key role in servicing regional communities.

“CASA is also working on improvements to the regulations covering maintenance personnel, licensing and aircraft design and manufacturing,” Mr Carmody said.

Maintenance is a major cost for general aviation aircraft operators. Last year, a landmark study found the maintenance of an ageing aircraft fleet and the cost of maintenance training were among “key challenges” facing the once-vibrant sector.

The sector has argued that aligning the maintenance rules with the US would provide cost savings without reducing safety.

Aircraft Maintenance Repair and Overhaul Business Association director Ken Cannane said his group wanted to see the Federal Aviation Regulations system that governs activities in the US adopted to replace the “old, dated” systems here.

“A lot of people in general aviation have actually been in the American system and worked under it and they actually know the benefits of it and how it works better,” Mr Cannane said.

Mr McCormack said the government was also aware of concerns the flight-training sector had about regulations for the licensing of flight crew.

The government and CASA would deliver “meaningful reforms for the benefit of general aviation while maintaining the high aviation safety standards demanded by all Australians”, Mr McCormack said.

The Australian has run a series of reports revealing the costs and red tape that have struck flying schools, the greater foreign ­ownership of Australian training schools and concerns by figures including prominent businessman and aviator Dick Smith that layers of red tape are rendering Australia’s general aviation sector unviable.

Reply
#33
WAKEY WAKEY HAND OFF SNAKEY

Has Wingnut Carmody finally been pulled out of stasis? He admitted this;

“CASA boss Shane Carmody said these would be based as much as they could be on the best practices of “leading” aviation ­nations such as the United States”.

That’s right you muppet. We’ve been saying for the past 20 years at least that the Yanks and New Zulland have pretty much got it right. Yet during that same period of time our deluded Australian Government has sadly, and embarrassingly, conjured up the notion that Aus is the best! Ha ha ha.

And of course the usual rhetoric and empty promises gets rolled out by Miniscule McDo’nothing;

“Ahead of a landmark general aviation summit in Wagga Wagga next week. The Weekend Australiancan reveal Infrastructure and Transport Minister ­Michael McCormack will announce today that the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has started work on the regulations with a stated ­objective of reducing costs and easing the burden of red tape”.

Blah blah blah fool. Same press release, same wording, just the date and Ministers name has changed. Presstitutes Peter Gobbed’off, Hitch sitting in the Ministers seat and that fool Steve Creepy would have a chubby.
Reply
#34
Opening session: Minty shines; miniscule 4G is apparently genuine -  Dodgy





2nd segment: Q&A session miniscule 4G; iCAO SecGen; & Ken Lewis: 





Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





Segments of note: 

Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

Mike Smith approx: -21:00 

MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
#35
(07-09-2018, 05:12 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Opening session: Minty shines; miniscule 4G is apparently genuine -  Dodgy





2nd segment: Q&A session miniscule 4G; iCAO SecGen; & Ken Lewis: 





Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





Segments of note: 

Lawrence Paratz,International Comanche Society of Australasia: approx: -1:47:00 (must watch -  Wink )

Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

Mike Smith approx: -21:00 

Newsfeed, via WinNews... Wink





Livefeed to Wagga Summit dinner:





MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
#36
A wee gathering?

What, no pics of the Miniscule taking a piss at the toilet trough? (Not to be confused with the taxpayer trough!)
Then again, he probably does squat to take a piss......
Reply
#37
(07-09-2018, 08:35 PM)Peetwo Wrote:
(07-09-2018, 05:12 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Opening session: Minty shines; miniscule 4G is apparently genuine -  Dodgy





2nd segment: Q&A session miniscule 4G; iCAO SecGen; & Ken Lewis: 





Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





Segments of note: 

Lawrence Paratz,International Comanche Society of Australasia: approx: -1:47:00 (must watch -  Wink )

Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

Mike Smith approx: -21:00 

Newsfeed, via WinNews... Wink





Livefeed to Wagga Summit dinner:





Prime7 news segment:






Via Oz Flying:


Quote:
  • [Image: michael_mccormack_web.jpg]Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack. (Steve Hitchen)
McCormack promises Collaboration for GA
10 July 2018
 
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack has said he will collaborate with reform attempts for general aviation, but added that getting any changes to the Civil Aviation Act through parliament could be difficult.

Speaking to delegates and observers at the Australian General Aviation Alliance (AGAA) summit in Wagga Wagga yesterday, McCormack also said he looked forward to the outcomes of the summit.

"I do want to work with you in a genuine collaborative, co-operative way to help general aviation.

"I am in no doubt about the passion in the GA industry, and whilst this summit will highlight some of the challenges you are facing, that passion can be used to meet those challenges, and I look forward to receiving the summary at the end of your conference to see what we can do to help bring about the change that you desire."

The aim of the summit is for the assembled associations to agree on changes to the Civil Aviation Act 1988 that are thought to be necessary for growth and survival of the general aviation industry. Such changes will need to pass through parliament, which McCormack highlighted would be difficult when the Liberal-National Party Coalition has a slender majority in the lower house.

"The fact remains that any change has to be able to pass the parliament," McCormack said, "not always easy when you're in a one-seat majority in that particular parliament. When you're in a parliament when the government of the day does not have control of the senate."

McCormack said he had been in contact with Shadow Minister for Infrastructure Transport Cities and Regional Developement Anthony Albanese, and both had agreed to do what they can to help general aviation.

"I want to work in a bipartisan way to help all industries," McCormack added, "not just aviation, but indeed anything that we can do in the transport space, indeed in infrastructure to help bring about much needed benefits for our community.

McCormack continued on to say that the requirement to take the cost impact into account in regulation was enshrined in the Statement of Expectations provided to CASA in March 2017.

"These are not just words," he said, "the Statement of Expectations is a legislative instrument and I expect the board of CASA to ensure it's requirements are indeed met.

"I can assure you I will work in partnership with our aviation agencies and the industry in tackling the challenges and opportunites for the GA sector."

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...iMCogBC.99

Via Australian Aviation:

Quote:Minister keen to listen as general aviation sector seeks reform
written by australianaviation.com.au July 9, 2018

[Image: PHAN8244.jpg]
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack says he is keen to listen to proposals for regulatory reform from Australia’s general aviation sector.

Representatives from more than 30 industry associations have gathered in Wagga Wagga for a two-day Australian General Aviation Alliance (AGAA) general aviation summit, which kicked off on Monday.

The AGAA has proposed changing the wording of the Civil Aviation Act, which currently as stated calls on Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) to “regard safety as the most important consideration” in its role regulating the industry.

Instead, CASA would be charged with ensuring the “highest level of safety in air navigation” in addition to having consideration for “an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector” and “the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation”.

Further, the AGAA proposal also called for the main object of the act to be to establish a regulatory framework for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the safety of civil aviation with particular emphasis on preventing aviation accidents and incidents.

And the AGAA also wanted the Civil Aviation Act to recognise the “importance of having a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry, and of enabling more people to benefit from aviation”.

The chairman of the general aviation summit Geoff Breust said in his welcome letter to delegates that there was “already consensus that the Civil Aviation Act required amendment”.

“Indeed the view has been around for some years,” Breust said.

“Our task is to agree on what that amendment should be – if not the actual words, the real intent to be covered in the wording.”

Delegates were also expected to come up with a communique outlining reforms designed to lift the regulatory burden and lower costs for those working in the general aviation sector.

McCormack said the federal government welcomed any suggestions that would improve Australia’s aviation safety legislative and regulatory framework.

Further, the Minister encouraged all delegates to focus on proposals that were “likely to have a practical effect delivering tangible improvements to the challenges GA is facing”.

“The government is working with you to deliver meaningful reforms for the benefit of general aviation while maintaining the high aviation safety standards demanded by all Australians,” McCormack told delegates in his speech.

“I will continue to listen and carefully consider the issues raised by people in the general aviation sector, and the government and portfolio aviation agencies will respond appropriately.

“I am keen to hear from you on the key issues you want tackled by government and industry that relate to GA operations in Australia.

“As a former small business owner, a Minister for Small Business and editor of a regional newspaper here in Wagga, I am very conscious of the challenges faced by small business in Australia and the need to remove unnecessary costs and regulatory burden.”

Airline Owners and Pilots Association of Australia (AOPA) executive director Benjamin Morgan said a change to the Civil Aviation Act and the adoption of rules from US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would help unlock the potential of this country’s general aviation sector and meet the demand of the airline industry.

While some in the sector have been calling for genuine change for at least a decade, if not longer, Morgan said there was hope the current push would yield those sought after reforms.

“Our industry has had plenty of demands over the years so we appreciate and we value the support that the Deputy Prime Minister has shown today,” Morgan told reporters on Monday.

“I’m actually reasonably buoyed by the statements that have been made. I can see that there is a clear intent and what we are going to be working towards to make sure that that intent translates into action.

“The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association will be working very hard to see to it that the Deputy Prime Minister honours his word and continues to work with this industry to provide a viable outcome because the reality is if we don’t achieve this we will see the general aviation industry collapse even further.

“There is a large portion of our industry at risk.”

AOPA has previously described the general aviation sector as “collapsing under the weight of regulation” and slowly dying.

CASA reforms to be completed over the next year

[Image: CASA-inspectors-crop.jpg]
McCormack said in his speech Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) was committed to completing the aviation regulatory reform package over the next 12 months.

In the meantime, there was ongoing work to improve the lot of those working in aviation, including general aviation.

To that end, the Minister announced in his speech changes to indemnity insurance for flight examiners.

“With effect from 1 September 2018, CASA indemnification will be provided to all Flight Examiner Rating holders and will continue for Approved Testing Officers,” McCormack told the summit.

“This announcement follows the completion of a policy review and public consultation by the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities earlier this year.

“This approach will help retain experienced industry flight testing personnel working in regional areas, I know this has been an issue that industry have been keen to see a resolution and I am glad that today we can announce the good news.”

News of the resolution surrounding indemnity insurance followed an announcement from CASA on Saturday it had introduced a new category of private pilot medical certificate that aimed to simplify the process and reduce costs for private pilots flying piston engine aircraft with a maximum take-off weight of less than 8618kg.

Further, operations were limited to below 10,000 feet in day visual flight rules conditions, with up to five non-fare-paying passengers.

The new Basic Class 2 medical certificate means pilots can use their own general practitioner for aviation medical certification, then complete the process online for a $10 processing fee.

This compared with having to visit a special aviation medical practitioner and pay a $75 processing fee under the previous arrangements.

“The new Basic Class 2 medical certificate is safe, simple, fair and inexpensive,” CASA director of aviation safety and chief executive Shane Carmody said in a statement.

“The medical certificate reforms made by CASA cut through unnecessary regulatory red tape and directly benefit many people in aviation, particularly those in general aviation.

“This is tangible evidence that CASA is working successfully to reduce the regulatory burden on the aviation community while maintaining appropriate safety standards.”

Further, McCormack said CASA had started work with the industry on the development of new general aviation maintenance regulations.

“There will be a new set of maintenance regulations tailored specifically for general aviation, which will be based as far as possible on best practices in leading aviation nations, such as the United States,” McCormack said.

“CASA is also working on improvements to the regulations covering maintenance personnel licensing and aircraft design and manufacturing.”


Day Two - Wagga Summit.


The Hon Anthony Albanese MP addressing the General Aviation Summit 2018

[Image: 36849445_1301873026610286_17844532681774...e=5BD0F054]



AOPA AUSTRALIA - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018 - DAY TWO WORKSHOPS

[Image: 36872561_1301807639950158_23653715780588...e=5BD3F319]


Outcomes/resolutions:

Quote:[Image: 36831823_1302134429917479_37661849928293...e=5BA714ED]

RESOLUTIONS - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018


The General Aviation Summit has agreed to pass two resolutions which (1) sets out the principal findings of the summit with regard to the regulation of general aviation in Australia and (2) commits the industry to providing appropriate information and to make recommendations for action on reform as follows.

1. The General Aviation Summit concluded:

1.1 General Aviation wants to maintain or improve Australia’s aviation safety outcomes; 

1.2 the General Aviation sector is of vital importance to Australia especially regional and rural Australia not only in economic terms but in social and community service provision terms;

1.3 the General Aviation sector, including the commercial elements of the sector, is overburdened with the complexity and cost flowing from the current Civil Aviation Act, Regulations and other aviation legislation; 

1.4 the current regulatory regime is based on a prescriptive approach to rules and compliance. World best practice is based on Outcome Based regulation which Australia should implement immediately in accordance with DAS Directive 01/2015 and the Minister’s CASA Statement of Expectations;

1.5 the cost and complexity burdens placed on the General Aviation sector are exacerbated by the actions of Airservices and airport operators, both privatised and local government owned, by further cost impositions, operational restrictions and inappropriate infrastructure development; 

1.6 the Australian economy has the opportunity to benefit from pilot and engineering training, aircraft and component maintenance and construction services flowing from the world-wide expansion of air travel and aviation activity – especially in Asia. To achieve this, we must be able to respond effectively and be liberated from over regulation; and

1.7 the attitude must be to adopt best regulatory practices in parallel with embracing safety and economic benefits of new technologies in Australian aircraft and operations. This will allow Australia to achieve its potential as an aviation leader, aviation service provider and exporter. 

2. In looking to the future, the Summit further resolved to:

2.1 provide a statement of value of the General Aviation sector in Australia;

2.2 provide a statement of opportunity for the General Aviation sector in Australia;

2.3 recommend the Civil Aviation Act and other Acts associated with aviation including aviation infrastructure, be reviewed and amended to ensure implementation of Outcome Based regulation during the first term of the next government;

2.4 in the meantime, to recommend a small number of amendments to the Civil Aviation Act to immediately refocus to a less prescriptive and holistic approach to regulation for bi-partisan passage through the parliament before the next election;

RESOLUTION: CHANGES TO THE CIVIL AVIATION ACT

Whereas the current regulatory stance adopted by CASA is out of step with contemporary regulatory practice, as adopted by The International Civil Aviation Organization through the promulgation of Annex 19, Safety Management Systems, and is contributing to the rapid decline of Australia’s general aviation industry, and 
Whereas the World is facing a growing shortage of skilled aviation personnel and Australia has the opportunity to contribute to the training of these personnel in a way that can improve safety, the Aviation Summit finds that elements of the current Civil Aviation Act are not fit for purpose.

Specifically, §9A, Performance of Functions, imposes upon CASA a limitation that impedes the development of performance-based regulation and the safety benefits that would otherwise be achieved. §9A (1) requires that, in exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must regard the safety of air navigation as the most important consideration and there is an urgent need to address this anomaly. 

2.4.1. The Aviation Summit supports a review of the Civil Aviation Act, to include as a minimum, a repeal of §9A (1) and a replacement with the following language: 
9A Performance of functions 

(1) In exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must seek to achieve the highest level of safety in air navigation as well as: 

(a) maintaining an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector; 

(b) the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation. 

2.4.2. The Summit delegates support the need to amend, as soon as possible, the Object of the Civil Aviation Act and other aviation related Acts, without reducing the primacy of safety, to include an amended Object to support a sustainable and viable aviation industry; 
The main objective of the Act is to establish a regulatory framework for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the safety of civil aviation with particular emphasis on preventing aviation accidents and incidents;

In addition to this, the objects must include;

i. a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry;
ii. enabling more people to benefit from aviation; and
iii. emphasis on substantially reducing the administrative and financial burden of regulatory compliance.
(Note: the final wording will be decided between both the Minister and Shadow Minister.

2.4.3. The summit delegates also support the inclusion of government’s Red Tape Policy to be permanently inserted in Section 98.

2.5 recommend establishment of an Office of Aviation Industry in the Department of Infrastructure and Transport to engage and assist industry to further foster and develop aviation both domestically and internationally; and

2.6 recommend that there are a number of advances in aviation safety and amenity that can be made within the current regulations and responsibilities. The summit seeks to have an established programme to identify, prioritise and implement a programme of these changes with defined time-frames and covering CASA, ASA and Aerodrome Operators (see ANNEX 1)

MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#38
Wagga Summit: Extra sessions etc.



Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





Segments of note: 

Lawrence Paratz,International Comanche Society of Australasia: approx: -1:47:00 (must watch -  Wink )

Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

Mike Smith approx: -21:00 



GA SUMMIT 2018 - DINNER SPEECHES








Day Two - Wagga Summit.




The Hon Anthony Albanese MP addressing the General Aviation Summit 2018

[Image: 36849445_1301873026610286_17844532681774...e=5BD0F054]



AOPA AUSTRALIA - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018 - DAY TWO WORKSHOPS

[Image: 36872561_1301807639950158_23653715780588...e=5BD3F319]



News segment - Win News:






Quote:High-flying summit resolves to liberate the skies with Aussies

[Image: 5b1037299ebd34178dcd5f97ec2c6003]
The Australian
... summit resolves to liberate the skies with Aussies. Labor's transport spokesman Anthony Albanese.

ANNABEL HEPWORTH

The general aviation sector must be “liberated” from over-­regulation so Australia can seize the opportunity to train pilots and engineers amid a growing global shortage of skilled aviators, major aviation groups say.

In resolutions made late yesterday, a landmark general aviation summit held in Wagga Wagga vowed to recommend a “small number” of changes to the Civil Aviation Act that it hoped would win bipartisan support and pass parliament before the next election. The summit also resolved to push for changes to the Civil Aviation Act and other ­aviation-related laws to ensure “outcome-based” rules were rolled out during the first term of the next government.

The sector wants the rewrite of the Civil Aviation Act to state that as well as seeking “highest level of safety in air navigation”, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is also required to aim to maintain an “efficient and sustainable” Australian aviation industry that includes a “viable” general aviation and training sector.

Earlier yesterday, Labor’s transport spokesman Anthony Albanese said it was “indeed a tragedy that we have not enough pilots in Australia today at a time when we should not only be able to service our domestic needs, we should actually be an export country when it comes to training pilots in order to secure greater national income for the national economy”.

“What we’re seeing is this enormous growth in aviation in the Asian region and Australia has enormous potential to benefit from that in terms of jobs and economic activity here,” Mr Albanese said.

He said he was committed to working closely with Infrastructure and Transport Minister Michael McCormack so that “any changes that are required are dealt with in a bipartisan way”.

Mr McCormack told the summit on Monday the government wanted to deliver “meaningful” reforms for the benefit of general aviation and had been in touch with Mr Albanese as he wanted to work in a bipartisan way.

However, any change would need to pass through parliament and that was “not always easy”, he warned.

The summit’s chairman, former Regional Express managing director Geoff Breust, said yesterday the resolutions were aimed at moving to “an outcomes-based regulatory system” instead of something that was “very prescriptive”.

“Safety is still the highest priority in relation to it all but without consideration of those other things, and in particular the cost and administrative burden to the industry of compliance, you end up with a system where the regulatory regime simply doesn’t work effectively,” Mr Breust said.

More than 35 groups attended the summit, although a clutch were there as observers.

Among the conclusions of the summit was a statement that “the Australian economy has the opportunity to benefit from pilot and engineering training, aircraft and component maintenance and construction services flowing from the worldwide expansion of air travel and aviation activity — especially in Asia”.


Outcomes/resolutions:


[Image: 36831823_1302134429917479_37661849928293...e=5BA714ED]

RESOLUTIONS - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018


The General Aviation Summit has agreed to pass two resolutions which (1) sets out the principal findings of the summit with regard to the regulation of general aviation in Australia and (2) commits the industry to providing appropriate information and to make recommendations for action on reform as follows.

1. The General Aviation Summit concluded:

1.1 General Aviation wants to maintain or improve Australia’s aviation safety outcomes; 

1.2 the General Aviation sector is of vital importance to Australia especially regional and rural Australia not only in economic terms but in social and community service provision terms;

1.3 the General Aviation sector, including the commercial elements of the sector, is overburdened with the complexity and cost flowing from the current Civil Aviation Act, Regulations and other aviation legislation; 

1.4 the current regulatory regime is based on a prescriptive approach to rules and compliance. World best practice is based on Outcome Based regulation which Australia should implement immediately in accordance with DAS Directive 01/2015 and the Minister’s CASA Statement of Expectations;

1.5 the cost and complexity burdens placed on the General Aviation sector are exacerbated by the actions of Airservices and airport operators, both privatised and local government owned, by further cost impositions, operational restrictions and inappropriate infrastructure development; 

1.6 the Australian economy has the opportunity to benefit from pilot and engineering training, aircraft and component maintenance and construction services flowing from the world-wide expansion of air travel and aviation activity – especially in Asia. To achieve this, we must be able to respond effectively and be liberated from over regulation; and

1.7 the attitude must be to adopt best regulatory practices in parallel with embracing safety and economic benefits of new technologies in Australian aircraft and operations. This will allow Australia to achieve its potential as an aviation leader, aviation service provider and exporter. 

2. In looking to the future, the Summit further resolved to:

2.1 provide a statement of value of the General Aviation sector in Australia;

2.2 provide a statement of opportunity for the General Aviation sector in Australia;

2.3 recommend the Civil Aviation Act and other Acts associated with aviation including aviation infrastructure, be reviewed and amended to ensure implementation of Outcome Based regulation during the first term of the next government;

2.4 in the meantime, to recommend a small number of amendments to the Civil Aviation Act to immediately refocus to a less prescriptive and holistic approach to regulation for bi-partisan passage through the parliament before the next election;

RESOLUTION: CHANGES TO THE CIVIL AVIATION ACT

Whereas the current regulatory stance adopted by CASA is out of step with contemporary regulatory practice, as adopted by The International Civil Aviation Organization through the promulgation of Annex 19, Safety Management Systems, and is contributing to the rapid decline of Australia’s general aviation industry, and 
Whereas the World is facing a growing shortage of skilled aviation personnel and Australia has the opportunity to contribute to the training of these personnel in a way that can improve safety, the Aviation Summit finds that elements of the current Civil Aviation Act are not fit for purpose.

Specifically, §9A, Performance of Functions, imposes upon CASA a limitation that impedes the development of performance-based regulation and the safety benefits that would otherwise be achieved. §9A (1) requires that, in exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must regard the safety of air navigation as the most important consideration and there is an urgent need to address this anomaly. 

2.4.1. The Aviation Summit supports a review of the Civil Aviation Act, to include as a minimum, a repeal of §9A (1) and a replacement with the following language: 
9A Performance of functions 

(1) In exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must seek to achieve the highest level of safety in air navigation as well as: 

(a) maintaining an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector; 

(b) the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation. 

2.4.2. The Summit delegates support the need to amend, as soon as possible, the Object of the Civil Aviation Act and other aviation related Acts, without reducing the primacy of safety, to include an amended Object to support a sustainable and viable aviation industry; 
The main objective of the Act is to establish a regulatory framework for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the safety of civil aviation with particular emphasis on preventing aviation accidents and incidents;

In addition to this, the objects must include;

i. a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry;
ii. enabling more people to benefit from aviation; and
iii. emphasis on substantially reducing the administrative and financial burden of regulatory compliance.
(Note: the final wording will be decided between both the Minister and Shadow Minister.

2.4.3. The summit delegates also support the inclusion of government’s Red Tape Policy to be permanently inserted in Section 98.

2.5 recommend establishment of an Office of Aviation Industry in the Department of Infrastructure and Transport to engage and assist industry to further foster and develop aviation both domestically and internationally; and

2.6 recommend that there are a number of advances in aviation safety and amenity that can be made within the current regulations and responsibilities. The summit seeks to have an established programme to identify, prioritise and implement a programme of these changes with defined time-frames and covering CASA, ASA and Aerodrome Operators (see ANNEX 1)





MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#39
A DISCUSSION A DAY KEEPS REAL CHANGE AWAY

Firstly, it is good to see some robust resolution items being tabled. It’s also good to see calls for bipartisan support to take place on both sides of the political landscape. However, ‘dialogue’ and ‘paper notes’ are mere window dressing. Real ‘change’ is yet to be seen, and we have had decades of group love-in sessions and wank fests, so excuse my scepticism. The longer we just ‘talk’ about the issue, the longer it will be until we see actual, measurable change.

On the upside, kudos to those who supported the summit and attended. There were some ballsy, robust discussions from industry. Whether the Muppets in charge of the political asylum actually bring about change will be the real can kicker.

P.S I was disappointed that the great white stuttering political elephant Albo didn’t do a pose for the photographer with his hands in the air! With a little more publicity I think a ‘hands in the air Albo pose’ could become as popular as twerking, planking, or bobbing for apples in the taxpayer trough!

‘Safe Wagga engagement for all’
Reply
#40
Dunno about you Gobbles but I watched the Miniscules speech a few times.

He went to great pains to advise everyone he's a straight talker, an honourable man,
with integrity and probity......he's a bloody politician for Christ sake.

He also mentioned Albo's name over and over. I developed the conclusion he was only there
because he was scared shitless Albo would trump him.

Methinks Minuscule spoke with forked tongue, I don't believe he's going to do a damned thing.
Reply
#41
Here, here thorny... Wink

(07-11-2018, 07:51 PM)thorn bird Wrote: Dunno about you Gobbles but I watched the Miniscules speech a few times.

He went to great pains to advise everyone he's a straight talker, an honourable man,
with integrity and probity......he's a bloody politician for Christ sake.

He also mentioned Albo's name over and over. I developed the conclusion he was only there
because he was scared shitless Albo would trump him.

Methinks Minuscule spoke with forked tongue, I don't believe he's going to do a damned thing.

For the record the following is what the DPM & miniscule - 'for doing absolutely fucking nothing' - believed he said to the bothersome aviation IOS... Dodgy :


Quote:Address to the General Aviation Summit
Speech
MM007/2018
09 July 2018
Wagga Wagga, NSW

Good morning and welcome to magnificent Wagga Wagga, I hope you all get a chance during your stay here to see some of the great attractions of my home city.

As the Minister responsible for aviation—and someone who has lived and worked here in the Riverina all my life—I appreciate the valuable role aviation plays in serving regional Australia.

I recognise the many economic and community contributions the GA sector makes, from flying training, aerial spraying, mustering and surveying, through to the delivery of medical, rescue and emergency services.

Whilst I’ve been Minister for only a relatively short time, I am in no doubt about the passion in the GA industry, and whilst this summit will highlight some of the challenges you are facing, that passion can be used to help meet those challenges.

The aviation sector, including GA, will continue to transform as it has done over the past few decades.  As with any other industry, it must.

Once, Wagga’s own Don Kendell flew his small GA aircraft out of this town to Sydney and Melbourne, now we see REX’s SAAB340s and Qantas’ Dash 8s.

The exponential growth in the use of drones is also testimony to the transformation going on in aviation, we can only imagine how these amazing technologies will be used by our kids in the future.

This means though that all aviation sectors, including GA, will need to adapt and change with future economic and technological developments.

Not only should industry adapt but so too government and government agencies.
In this regard I am encouraged by the recent work being done by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).

I know there are strong views on how CASA has performed over the years but there is good work being done right now under the leadership of CEO Shane Carmody.

Many initiatives over the past 12 months that have been supported by industry and that are benefitting GA include:
  • reforms in the aviation medicine system, which provide GA pilots with more options and simpler access to pilot medical certificates;
  • organisational changes, including a specific area dedicated to GA; and
  • better industry consultation with the establishment of an Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and Technical Working Groups.
As we announced last weekend, CASA has just introduced the new Basic Class 2 medical, which makes the process of getting a medical certificate much easier for many private pilots.

This change builds on aviation medical reforms made earlier this year, including making a Class 2 medical certificate available for pilots operating commercial non-passenger flights in smaller aircraft, and enabling Designated Aviation Medical Examiners to issue Class 2 medical certificates on the spot.

These measures streamline the processing of medical certificate applications; an issue I am aware that industry has consistently called for from CASA.

I am also aware there are calls for more, but CASA has not said they have finished. In fact, CASA are continuing to look to further reform as it reviews its medical processing system over the coming year.

We also announced on the weekend and I welcome news of CASA starting work with industry on the development of new general aviation maintenance regulations with the stated objective of minimising regulatory burden and reducing costs.

There will be a new set of maintenance regulations tailored specifically for general aviation, which will be based as far as possible on best practices in leading aviation nations, such as the United States.

CASA is also working on improvements to the regulations covering maintenance personnel licensing and aircraft design and manufacturing.

I am pleased that CASA will be drafting these new regulations with comprehensive guidance material in plain English to support them.

I am also very pleased that I can announce today that the issues surrounding indemnity insurance for our flight examiners has been resolved.

With effect from 1 September 2018, CASA indemnification will be provided to all Flight Examiner Rating holders and will continue for Approved Testing Officers. 

This announcement follows the completion of a policy review and public consultation by the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities earlier this year.

This approach will help retain experienced industry flight testing personnel working in regional areas, I know this has been an issue that industry have been keen to see a resolution and I am glad that today we can announce the good news.

As you all may be aware, CASA has committed to completing the aviation regulatory reform package over the next 12 months, a journey that I am sure industry is keen to see completed.

But, to do so CASA needs industry engagement and commitment in finalising future regulatory approaches working together through the CASA-industry Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and associated Technical Working Groups.

I am delighted to be informed that over 500 industry representatives have registered with CASA to participate and assist with the Technical Working Groups and over 80 industry members are already involved in the consideration of key regulatory reforms.

A key part of this consultation will be detailed consideration of the safety case and cost impacts of proposed reforms and the agreed objective of having less complex regulations.
 
The impact of costs on the GA industry is a key theme of this summit.

I remain very much committed to the Government’s Statement of Expectations issued to the CASA Board in March last year by my colleague the Hon Darren Chester.

These require CASA, in its regulatory approach, to consider economic and cost impacts on individuals, businesses and the community, and to take a pragmatic and proportionate approach to regulation as it applies to different sectors.

These are not just words. The Statement of Expectations is a legislative instrument and I expect the Board of CASA to ensure its requirements are met.

The Board will be reporting quarterly to me on their performance against the Statement and their corporate plan.

I can also assure you that I will work in partnership with our aviation agencies and industry in tackling the challenges and opportunities for the GA sector, identified in the Government commissioned Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics—BITRE study released late last year.

These challenges are diverse.

They range from fuel and maintenance costs, airport leases and charges; the impact of some regulatory changes and delays in CASA reviews, to a lack of robust data on the GA sector.

The Study also showed that Australia is not alone in facing economic, demographic and regulatory factors affecting GA, with several major countries such as the UK, US and Canada also suffering declines in GA activity.

BITRE’s recent release of the 2016 GA Activity Survey has showed some encouraging signs in terms of increased flying activity in some parts of GA such as aerial work, flying training and aerial mustering.

But I acknowledge that there are still serious challenges facing GA.

Not long ago I enjoyed a very positive meeting with the industry-led GA Advisory Group, chaired by the CEO of the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Martin Laverty. Martin presented me with the Group’s work plan for 2018-19.

The work plan takes into account the findings of the BITRE GA Study and lays out three key priorities the Group will be working on and providing the Government with advice on this year.

The first of these priorities—developing a broad, long term perspective for GA, will look at defining GA, its role, strategic and legislative framework and identify levers to better promote GA in Australia, will be progressed at the Group’s next meeting next month.

The Group’s work on the other two key priorities—examining how air safety regulation can support GA and maintaining and enhancing GA industry capability through workforce planning and access to airspace and infrastructure, will also provide valuable advice for Government and industry consideration.

The Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities, along with CASA will also work with the Group as they respond to these priorities.

The Group is a vital source of advice to these agencies as they undertake their policy and regulatory work.

For example, the Group has a range of representatives who are well placed to contribute to CASA’s future review of flight crew licensing and flight training regulations.

I know these regulations are the source of ongoing industry concerns and I welcome the opportunity for the Group to contribute with their broad experiences in the field and I encourage you, the GA industry, to also contribute.

To further support the Group’s GA experience, I have decided to invite Mr Marc de Stoop, recent President of AOPA Australia, to join the Group.

I am also aware that aviation training and the availability and retention of aviation professionals including pilots and aviation maintenance engineers is of key concern to the industry as a whole and GA. 

I believe there are great opportunities for the future expansion of training of Australian and overseas pilots in Australia.

An industry-led review of aviation skills and training has been conducted by Greg Russell, the Chair of the Australian Aviation Associations Forum, and will make recommendations for industry and Government consideration later this month.

I welcome the announcement by Qantas of the establishment of its own new pilot training academy next year and note the recent selection of nine regional locations, including Wagga Wagga, for further feasibility assessment by the airline, with a final decision expected in the September quarter this year.

Over the next two days. I am very aware that a major part of your discussions will be looking at potential amendments to the Civil Aviation Act 1988, CASA’s governing legislation. 

The Government welcomes any suggestions which would improve our aviation safety legislative and regulatory framework.

I also wish to acknowledge and welcome the attendance tomorrow at this summit of the Shadow Minister and former Minister, the Hon Anthony Albanese.

I have had the opportunity to meet with the Shadow Minister and agreed that we are both committed to adopt a bipartisan approach to aviation safety.

Aviation safety is above politics.

We are both committed to aviation safety being the most important consideration in safety regulation and recognise that CASA must be allowed to perform its dedicated safety regulatory role.

The views of other key industry, Government and community stakeholders must also be considered.

This will also include CASA of course, who need to perform their safety regulatory function on behalf of government, the travelling public and the community.

I do recognise that issues of sustainability and promotion of aviation and its different sectors are matters of importance to consider in establishing and reviewing Government economic and industry policy settings impacting on the industry.

As a former small business owner, a Minister for Small Business and editor of a regional newspaper here in Wagga, I am very conscious of the challenges faced by small business in Australia and the need to remove unnecessary costs and regulatory burden.

I must also say, that’s why this Government has legislated small business tax relief, dropping the corporate rate from 30 cents to 25 cents in the dollar—and with large business to follow suit.

It’s why we’ve extended the $20,000 instant asset write-off, a highly popular action designed to boost cash flow and encourage business development and re-investment.

This Government is pro-business!

But specifically, the Government is working with you to deliver meaningful reforms for the benefit of general aviation while maintaining the high aviation safety standards demanded by all Australians.

I will continue to listen and carefully consider the issues raised by people in the general aviation sector, and the Government and portfolio aviation agencies will respond appropriately.

And here’s a chance now…I am keen to hear from you on the key issues you want tackled by Government and industry that relate to GA operations in Australia.

Finally, can I encourage you to focus on proposals that are likely to have a practical effect delivering tangible improvements to the challenges GA is facing.

Thank you for the opportunity to talk to you all today, I hope your summit is successful and that you enjoy the splendours of our beautiful city.

Thank you.
 
How so very disappointing that once again we have a complete NFI, numbnut Nationals' MP in charge of overseeing the government aviation safety agencies, that have been embuggering a vital industry for the better part of three decades under the false premise of enhancing and protecting our aviation safety standards - WHAT A LOAD OF BOLLOCKS!  Dodgy

However, despite the so out of touch miniscule McDonothing's weasel worded protestation's and promises, it would appear there is a growing majority of industry stakeholders that are now refusing to accept the normal government wet lettuce platitudes of future reform. This ground swell of unified industry discontent needs to be amplified to the 'point of no return' (PNR) for effective implementation of a bi-partisan/non-partisan -  Big Grin - supported change to the Civil Aviation Act that would see the primary function of CASA be rectified to reflect that of an administrator versus that of a so called 'safety enforcer' and to finally do away with the "S" in CASA. (Ps. Please refer to Mike Smith speech for historical relevance - from -21:00 HERE.)

Dear miniscule 4G...

Quote:You have been judged by your countrymen.

You have been weighed.

You have been measured.

And you been found wanting.

...TICK TOCK 4G...TICK TOCK indeed -  Big Grin  

MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
#42
Herr Thorny;

”Dunno about you Gobbles but I watched the Miniscules speech a few times.”

Sorry mate, once is all I could stand. To have to watch it thrice, well I would prefer to be sodomised by a speeding freight train!
Reply
#43
Albo's Wagga Summit bollocks; & gcafinal UP post: 

Via Albo's media minion: 

Quote:Jul 10, 2018
Speech to General Aviation Summit -‘Securing Australia’s General Aviation Future: Together’ – Wagga Commercial Club, Wagga Wagga

Aviation matters.

That’s even more so for a country like Australia, which inhabits a vast island continent located in a remote part of the globe.  It not only connects us with each other, but also with all of the economic opportunity and cultural experiences the globalised world of the 21st century has to offer.

This year alone, the world’s airlines will carry more than three billion passengers – equivalent to about half of the Earth’s population.

And by value, a third of the goods traded internationally will be transported by air.

However, without General Aviation, this mass movement of people and commerce would not be possible.  The fact is, you, along with the organisations and businesses you represent here today, school the pilots and train the engineers that makes all this possible.

But the role of General Aviation doesn’t stop there.

Your industry is as diverse as it is important.

From balloons to microlights, helicopters to business jets, hobbyist to professional pilots, you have a rich history in this country, directly employing over 3500 Australians, and performing essential services such as charter flights, search and rescue, fire-fighting, surveying and aerial photography, lifesaving aeromedical care, and aircraft maintenance.

That’s why the former Federal Labor Government, in which I had the privilege of serving as Aviation Minister, developed this nation’s first ever Aviation White Paper, which had as one of its stated objectives the “maintenance of a safe, efficient and innovative General Aviation sector”.

This document provided a comprehensive and balanced framework, bringing together all aspects of aviation policy into a single, coherent and forward-looking statement.

Importantly, it included initiatives designed to give your industry the certainty and incentive to plan and invest for the long term.

In particular, we:
  • Introduced more generous accelerated depreciation rates for aircraft as an incentive for owners to upgrade their aircraft;

  • Reduced the number of 24-hour restricted airspace areas from 81 to 15;

  • Committed to the continued operation and growth of secondary capital city airports;

  • Ensured the master plans of secondary airports maintained a strong focus on aviation development, not non-aeronautical uses that could compromise future aviation activities;

  • Lessened the financial burden of regulation on the sector by restricting increases in CASA regulatory service charges to rises in the Consumer Price Index.

However, I appreciate that the transition to more commercial charging arrangements, which began in the 1980s, has been challenging.

Nonetheless, I remain very optimistic about your industry’s future.

In fact, I come here today with a clear message: Labor wants your ranks to grow.

We want more people taking to the skies, either as a career or simply for the sheer joy of flying.
Plus, if we get the policy settings right, your industry has the potential to become a major new source of export dollars for Australia.

Indeed, Australia’s favourable weather, relatively uncongested skies and proximity to the booming economies of Asia are competitive advantages which put us in a strong position to become a training ground for the region’s future pilots.

We need to build a stronger General Aviation industry so that we can grasp such opportunities.
It comes down to a simple idea: partnership.

A partnership between policy makers, regulators and the industry; one built on mutual respect and shared goals.

We all agree that safety must come first in an industry where there is no margin for error.

However, the message I am getting loud and clear from sections of your industry is that as things stand, a pure focus on safety has in some cases led to over-regulation and added unreasonably to your costs.

It is only through working together that we can properly assess whether we are getting it right on the balance between safety and cost.

My concern at present is that while there are plenty of claims being made about such matters in the media and elsewhere, people are talking over each other.

What we need is a mature, positive conversation.

The starting point to a fair assessment of the existing regime is a clear understanding and acceptance of the different pressures faced by the regulators and the regulated.

CASA and the Transport Minister have very clear pressures on them.

Their business is safety.

If there is a tragic accident, it is the regulators who must account for what went wrong.
It is they who have to meet the public’s expectation for adequate safety regulation.
Because of this, regulators will always naturally tend toward a conservative view on safety standards.

However, there’s always a risk that in creating an aviation system that is conservative on safety, we fail to understand the impact that we are having on operators.

I can understand why operators trying to make their businesses work might want to suggest changes that they feel will reduce unnecessary regulation without putting lives at risk.

I understand such sentiments, particularly when they come from operators with excellent safety records.

There are always going to be tensions between regulators and the industry.

If that tension is based on a partnership that puts the public interest first, it’s positive tension that should deliver the best outcome.

That’s why I emphasise the need for a positive partnership.

I am here today to listen to the concerns of the General Aviation sector.

I’ve got an open mind on these issues as long as safety is not compromised.

And I’m sure you would agree with that.

This is not about left versus right or old versus new.

I want to make clear to everyone in this room that I take a bipartisan view to aviation safety.

The job of Transport Minister is a difficult one.

I’ve done it before and would like to do it again.

But in Government or Opposition, I will work closely with Michael McCormack.

Many of Michael’s political views might not be the same as mine, but I respect the great responsibility he bears and I accept that he is completely sincere in the way he is approaching his role.

I have indicated to Michael, as I did to his predecessor, that I am willing to support legislative reform that would explicitly recognise the regulatory arrangements, whilst prioritising safety, must also ensure that CASA have regard for:
  • The maintenance of a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry (including a viable general aviation training sector) and;

  • The need to enable more people to benefit from civil aviation.

These should be the next most important considerations.

I think the new Minister wants to get the balance right as much as you and I do.

I support his decision to establish an industry-led General Aviation Advisory Group, which is currently chaired by the CEO of the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Martin Laverty.

This was a positive step towards giving the industry a voice in government.

I’ll keep working in a bipartisan way on these issues.

Simply put, the future of General Aviation in this country should be above politics.

Lastly, I am particularly keen to engage with the people in this room on any ideas you may have on how, collectively, we take General Aviation forward.

After all, it is you that have been fighting passionately for the future of your industry; tirelessly promoting General Aviation in all the forms represented here today – and doing so without great fanfare and often little recognition.

Together, we can secure Australia’s General Aviation future.

Again, thank you for inviting me here today.

Don't you just hate it when Government and the opposition start talking about bi-partisanship arrangements/agreements on aviation and 'aviation safety'. IMO such weasel words and motherhood statements are a precursor to 'nothing will change' and the aviation safety bureaucracy, led by the CASA Iron Ring, will continue to baffle and obfuscate the miniscule and government of the day by simply pulling out the 'safety card' - FDS!  Dodgy 

That said the Albo doorstop interview was IMO a little bit more positive than his Summit speech... Rolleyes 


Quote:,SHADOW MINISTERIAL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS
Jul 10, 2018
Transcript of Doorstop – Wagga Wagga – Tuesday, 10 July 2018
Subjects: General aviation, Michael McCormack, Riverina Intermodal Freight and Logistics Hub, Mark Latham.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: It’s been a pleasure to be here in Wagga Wagga today talking about the importance of general aviation.

The entire industry is of course committed to safety but what they also want to make sure is that we have a sector that’s growing, that’s able to train pilots and other people in the aviation sector because of the importance of general aviation to Australia as an island continent. But also the potential that’s there for growth, even as an export industry.

It is indeed a tragedy that we have not enough pilots in Australia today at a time when we should not only be able to service our domestic needs, we should actually be an export country when it comes to training pilots in order to secure greater national income for the national economy.
What we’re seeing is this enormous growth in aviation in the Asian region and Australia has enormous potential to benefit from that in terms of jobs and economic activity here.

Today’s forum is a part of a constructive dialogue and I’m committed to working closely with the Minister, Michael McCormack, to ensure that the recommendations that come out of this conference for any changes that are required are dealt with in a bipartisan way, because aviation safety shouldn’t be a partisan political issue and I know that is a view shared by Minister McCormack.

JOURNALIST: It has been something that they’ve been campaigning on for about 30 years they say. Do you think Minister McCormack is doing enough? He’s only new to the role, but would you say that he is on it?

ALBANESE: Well he’s new to the role, but he has attended this conference. He has constructively sat down with me. I sat down with his predecessor earlier on, Barnaby Joyce.

And I think Michael McCormack is committed to the same things that I am and that the people who are attending this conference are, which is aviation safety being critical, but also a growing general aviation sector.

JOURNALIST: What should he be doing? What conversations were had?

ALBANESE: What Michael McCormack should be doing is working with the Opposition in a constructive way to make any changes that are required to make sure that there’s not over-regulation; that regulation satisfies safety as a priority, but that also allows the industry to grow and to expand and to provide training opportunities.

General aviation is very important in this country. Quite clearly there are a number of other issues that have been raised with me today that I look forward to having discussions with the Minister about – issues such as the charging of airports on the activities of general aviation, making sure that we protect airports from non-aeronautical development so that aviation remains the focus of the airports, particularly secondary airports and regional airports around Australia. This is of vital importance and it’s one which I’m sure the Minister will work constructively with myself on.

I’m very positive about the discussions that we’ve had. We’re both committed to making sure that this not be a partisan political issue and today’s conference, getting the input from the sector is now something that they will submit to us jointly in coming weeks and we’ll sit down and work out how these issues can be addressed.

JOURNALIST: What do you think is the future of regional airlines?

ALBANESE: Well regional airlines are so important. That’s why we’ve ensured for example regional access to Sydney Airport. There was a proposal last week from TTF that would completely deregulate the activity at Sydney Airport, which would mean that regions such as Wagga Wagga were not able to have that access during peak periods into and out of Sydney. Now that’s critical for regional cities, such as Wagga Wagga. I flew here this morning from Sydney Airport. There are flights back this afternoon during that peak period, and it’s absolutely vital that we protect those regional slots at Sydney Airport for regional airlines.

JOURNALIST: Mr Albanese, as Shadow Infrastructure Minister, do you think there’s a role for the Federal Government in getting the Riverina Intermodal Freight and Logistics Hub off the drawing board and into reality?

ALBANESE: Well certainly when we were in Government, this was an issue that was raised and Simon Crean as the Regional Development Minister was very supportive of the intermodal. This has been around for a considerable period of time and it should be progressed. It’s something that the Federal Government should look at – the business case for any proposal, because intermodal hubs can be really important in ensuring that there’s employment growth in regional centres. There of course is a major intermodal which will be at Parkes, where I will be next week in fact. But here in Wagga Wagga is a logical location given its proximity to the Hume Highway, given where Wagga Wagga’s located between Australia’s two largest cities.

JOURNALIST: Mr Albanese, do you think with all the issues in general aviation and aviation more broadly that the sector would benefit from a Minister for Aviation (inaudible) … alone?

ALBANESE: Well there is a Minister for Aviation and it’s Michael McCormack. The issue of having a Minister for Aviation who doesn’t have other responsibilities is that will be a junior Minister. Michael McCormack is the Deputy Prime Minister of Australia. He is able to sit in the Cabinet. He is someone who is ranked number two in this nation and therefore I think that that gives him more influence than a junior Minister outside the Cabinet with the specific designation of aviation. So, whilst that might sound attractive what you’ve got to look at is influence and there’s no doubt that Michael McCormack, as someone who is the Leader of the National Party and the Deputy Prime Minister, has more influence that a junior Minister for Aviation would have.

It also is the case that aviation doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It exists in conjunction with other transport modes including road and rail. So when we look at the way that transport networks work, whether it be shipping, aviation, road or rail – they’re integrated in how they function and how we move people and how we move freight.

So, I think it does make sense to have a Transport Minister in a senior role in the Cabinet. But it’s also the case that perhaps, there is an argument to have a junior Minister assisting Minister McCormack, but I wouldn’t want to see aviation diluted in its importance from where it is now.
JOURNALIST: Mr Albanese you mentioned in your speech the Aviation White Paper a couple of times that was done in 2009. Is that paper going to form the basis of the ALP’s aviation policy going forward?

ALBANESE: Well it’s provided a basis of things that happened in Government. There were 34 recommendations, just about all of them were implemented in full, including the changes I spoke about – the increased depreciation, the prioritisation of aviation activity at secondary airports, a range of the other regulatory changes that were made including a restriction on the amount in which CASA fees could increase to CPI. There were a range of changes which came out of that Aviation White Paper to assist general aviation, they were all implemented.

But the truth is that that was in 2009, it’s now 2018 and things don’t stand still. So of course Labor will update our policies if we’re in a position to form Government. And today’s conference is a part of that, responding to the immediate needs of industry as indicated by them.
  
For mine the following gcafinal post off the UP almost perfectly summarises the current state of embuggerance being inflicted on industry by the aviation safety agencies and the Dept Wink :  

Quote:gcafinal - CASA

Here it all goes again. Approximately 20 years ago, CASA were tasked to review Australian aviation legislation. The existing Civil Aviation Act 9C requires them to do that. To date, the legislative shambles continues and we do not have a coherent set of regulations that are clear so that Australian aviation can operate without error. This situation represents a series of latent failures within the hysterical application by CASA of the Reason model for aviation systems safety (adding compliance on the end of the title), so that failure is guaranteed because everyone is struggling to find the correct legislation that applies to their operation. This is made worse by the incredible number of CASA Legislative Instruments, Non-Legislative Instruments, Authorisations, Designations, Exemptions, Instructions, Permissions and Permits, Specifications and Policy Statements. Even that is not the complete list!

Delegations under the Act and Regulations are then given to an incredible number of CASA inspectors who can then act as they please because "CASA must be satisfied" as indicated in the Civil Aviation Act Subdivision D Issue of AOCs. CASA is struggling to get qualified people because no-one wants to join an organisation that has the reputation it currently has within the industry. If this was not true then a GA Summit would not be required. CASA Human Resources now recruits "safety experts" who have university degrees in human factors but no flying, airworthiness or airport management backgrounds and are so busy giving the industry a hard time with Part 141 and Part 142 approvals that the approval process becomes very subjective, resulting in non-standardisation of the rules and inspectors who constantly state "in my opinion..." This means that they can do what they like and get away with it. CASA offices around the country are not standardised in the application of their duties hence the large list of administrative mechanisms as detailed above now working against the Australian aviation (especially general aviation) industry. There is no evidence that shows CASA Canberra actually knows what is going on in their Area Offices.

The Royal Aero Clubs of Queensland and South Australia have fully closed and the aero clubs at Townsville, Darwin and numerous other places have now closed their doors permanently. The Senate Estimates Committee (for Transport) have failed in making CASA do what it is supposed to do. The number of U-Tube presentations showing their incompetence is amazing. Other Federal agencies send their Commissioners or equivalent to the Senate Estimates Meetings sometimes accompanied by another representative from their agency and usually perform well. CASA arrives with up to 15 people and when asked by the Senators why there are so many people present they are told that they are required because of the need to ensure the questions can be answered. Responses to the Senators questions are then answered with, "I will take that on notice Senator, I do not have that information to hand," or " I will refer that to my Executive Manager (portfolio). Yet none of them have any of the answers to the questions asked and embark in public service jargon to cover their lack of knowledge. Incredibly, the Senate Estimates committee lets them get away with this very low performance meeting after meeting. This debacle has been going on for quite a while now. With a CEO on an unjustifiable salary in the vicinity of $600,000 dollars per annum and his subordinates also on massive salaries, the question of whether the Australian aviation industry is getting value for the massive funds expended on CASA and its other aviation agencies is very clear. The country is not getting any value. The internet shows CASA Area Managers declaring themselves "aviation experts," some on the basis that they were in non-flying roles in the air forces of other countries, but have absolutely no experience in Australia.

Small wonder the country has a very serious aviation problem with rural economic hubs closing rapidly with repercussions in all sorts of industries, loss of jobs, loss of commercial hubbing and communication and aeroplanes sadly parked everywhere. A lot of Australian airports are now almost at closure point. Australia needs to get rid of CASA and Airservices Australia completely and start again with a brand new staff recruited from people who are competent and have been in the Australian aviation sector for a significant period of time. Clearly CASA also needs to rid itself of its Human Resources and Office of Legal Counsel people (or whatever their latest title is) and outsource it to agencies that can do the job properly.

A good start would be to start again with a new Department under a Federal Government Minister and merging the aviation elements of the Department of Infrastructure and Transport, ATSB, CASA, Airservices Australia and the aviation sector of AMSA. The number of Federal Government agencies supposedly controlling aviation in Australia is superbly inefficient. It is made worse by interference from State Government transport departments also with dedicated aviation regulators.

Good luck with the meeting at Wagga. Maybe this time there is hope. However, this problem is well beyond the agenda proposed, but a start has to be made somewhere. Australian aviation is in a massive mess and it will take very dramatic steps by the House of Representatives and Senate to stop the current serious decline and especially the uncertainty caused by CASA's mishandling of aviation legislation.
MTF...P2  Cool
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#44
Doom, gloom, and Dick Smith.

Over at UP HQ Dick has been busy sketching the general feeling of ‘we’re ducked’ left in wake of the lackluster miniscule waffle.

Dick – “Clearly general aviation is doomed because Minister McCormack still believes safety is more important than cost. He made it clear in Wagga at the summit that he has the same views as previous Minister John Anderson which caused the problems in the first place.”

He’s right – up to a point. I don’t think anyone listening after the first few minutes of the say nothing 4G ‘speech’ thought anything else. When you add the threat of a bipartisan agreement to abrogate all ministerial responsibility back to CASA and keep paying the  enormous sums that level of protection racket demands; it presents a grim vision of the future. Can we bring that to a full stop (or a screaming halt)?

In my own muddled opinion, I believe we can. The weapon of choice being the Senate. Barring the odd, rabid, gender confused wooer’s of rainbow votes, lost Rice Puddings and the rare ‘undisclosed investment’ the majority of the Senators seem to be a calm, statesman like bunch. For example, the proposed audit of the ASA, ATSB and CASA have not been pushed forward by the likes of Mike 4G, but by the Senate committee Estimates panels. The shameful Pel-Air debacle expose was a Senate generated bomb shell.

A small, dedicated ‘lobby group’ making appointments to meet and discuss the situation with Senators could be the small spark which kicks off the bonfire. There are ‘other’ politicians who are not only approachable, but will allocate time to give a short, succinct easily understood argument a fair hearing.

P2 - "Now that the BO roadblock is soon to be removed, it has been reported from the Wagga summit, the Senate RRAT committee has committed itself to a renewed vigor of providing (non-partisan) Parliamentary advocacy for the aviation industry"...

This is a highly ‘political’ battle we are embroiled in, there is no turning back. Perhaps its time to fight fire with fire, politics with politics and enforce the will of the people – it is after all what our forbears have fought and died for, since Magna Carta.

One thing is certain – another decade od playing Ring around the Roses with the likes of the pathetic 4G miniscule will see the end of a once vibrant industry. Time, methinks, to saddle up and take the high road to Canberra.

[Image: NewRoadDamascus.jpg]

Aye well, there’s my two bob, spent as pleased me best.

Selah..
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#45
Kharon;

“This is a highly ‘political’ battle we are embroiled in, there is no turning back. Perhaps its time to fight fire with fire, politics with politics and enforce the will of the people – it is after all what our forbears have fought and died for, since Magna Carta”.


‘K’ pretty much sums up the state of play. 30 years of the same meaningless dribble. Nothing short of civil war, an uprising or a nuclear holocust creating a 1000 year winter will change things. The Government ‘manual’ is a procedures book written over 100 years ago and updated weekly, in favour of the ruling authority. In their hearts and minds the ramblings, applied pressure and musings of a number of IOS in the aviation society is laughable and a waste of energy. CASA, Defense, ATO and Centrelink are examples of having the cards stacked against you. A win you say? Ha. Hardly. Never. Unlikely. Keep dreaming.
Our industry is dead in the water and there is nothing we can do about it.

Goooooooooone.
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