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Things that go bump in the night,
Oh dead oh dear....talk about leaving yourself wide open!!

WODGER to ATCO: WADDA YA MEAN CRASHED??

ATCO: Sir the system crashed

WODGER: (thinks)..where's the skull when you need him.

WODGER: RIGHT YOU LOT, SHUT THEM DOWN, DON'T CARE HOW YOU DO IT, JUST SHUT THEM DOWN!

ATCO: But Sir we'd be shutting ourselves down, it was just a computer glitch.

WODGER: GLITCH...GLITCH!!! THAT'S NOT AN EXCUSE!! YOU SAID THEY CRASHED FOR CHRIST SAKE...NOBODY CRASHES ON MY WATCH (starting to foam at the mouth)....SHUT THEM DOWN I SAID!!

ATCO: But Sir we'd need a reason to shut down ATC.Think of all the jobs that would be lost, think of all the money that would be lost, think of the punters, think of the country, we have no grounds to shut us down

WODGER: (thinks) God where's a worthless and a Dubious when you need them

WODGER TO ATCO: LISTEN YOU SILLY LITTLE LACKY YOU...I SAID THEY CRASHED...CRASHING IS ALL THE CAUSE YOU NEED....MAKE IT UP YOU FOOL, JUST MAKE IT UP (thinks) wonder if Worthless and Dubious would shift camp?
Reply
Two minutes in the sin bin for TB.

Naughty TB; bad, bad, bad! How dare you impugn the spotless record of Dubious – as if he would ever follow his leader into the pit of gunpowder, treason and plot; why the man’s a pillar of aeronautical society – unless you count the odd document, signed under duress and recanting his ‘evidence’ – shame on you TB, shame.

The second minute is due to even daring to mention Inutile Lad; he of top-gun fame. A super-star sky god who firmly believes in many wondrous notions. A tower of integrity unfortunately, tarred with Wodger’s brush; a travesty his many admirers say.

No, no, the two minute ban applies and; if you argue, we will bar the wearing of lampshades at the BRB indaba.

Now, be a good chap and get ‘em in; yes , same again – do I look like a bloody camel?
Reply
Week of buckets, bollocks & trough top ups - Part II.

Quote from AGAD Chester's thread post #317:

Quote:..Airservices operates as a world leading air traffic control and aviation rescue and firefighting service provider, backed by the requisite facilities and skilled workforce.

While acknowledging the efficiency, asset and project management benefits of the Airservices Accelerate Program, the Chair and CEO of Airservices have assured me that the Program will not affect the level of safety provided by front-line air traffic and aviation rescue and firefighting service staff.   Hmm...oh yeah??

Quote:Airservices Accelerating towards disaster - [Image: confused.gif]
In the space of less than two weeks and under Harfwit's watch we've had... [Image: huh.gif]

Airservices, with Defence, is progressing?? the Onesky project with the aim to update our Air Traffic technology and in doing so it will be ready for increased activity and to do so more efficiently and safely...

Which brings me to today's Oz article that presents an upbeat Harfwit trying to resurrect the OneSKY Great White Elephant carcass by spruiking the fictional advantages of the OnePIE fairytale. Meanwhile a less upbeat RAAF Chief, while not directly supporting the Harfwit self-flagellating appraisal of OnePIE, does talk to the obvious advantages of having a integrated National ATC system. Just not sure Davies is referring to the present incarnation of the OnePIE clusterduck... Huh

Quote:
Quote:OneSKY to cut flight times
[Image: b419fed9dd8e86f7a6f10fd8d6815050]12:00amGREG BROWN
The OneSKY Australia program will reduce flight delays and make travel time shorter.

The OneSKY Australia program will reduce flight delays and make travel time shorter, according to Airservices Australia chief executive Jason Harfield.

Mr Harfield said the program, which will integrate the civil and defence air-traffic-control systems, would create efficiencies and lead to a better flight experience for passengers.

“Having one system means that all our controllers are getting a shared picture, there is not a separate view from a military perspective and a separate view form a civil perspective,” Mr Harfield said on Wednesday.

“When that occurs it means we can have more efficient and flexible operations, both from a military perspective ... (and) a civil perspective, which then flows on to improving flight times, reducing delays.

“From an airline perspective it means that they can get more turn times for the flights because they are in the air for less time. That has a flow-on benefit for even the regular travelling public because it is saving them time.”

Royal Australian Air Force chief Leo Davies said it was an opportunity to co-ordinate the use of airspace.

“The current military system is at lifetime, we are continuing to fix it, it is in many respects becoming a system that requires more and more effort to remain functional,” Air Marshal Davies said.

“We need a new air-traffic-management system for defence. The thing that flows then, logically, is why would we have a disparate system that was not ­integrated when we are talking about being integrated across all the aspects of aviation?

“We would have missed a real opportunity.”

He said the program needed to provide for the changing use of the sky.

“It needs to provide us with a level of flexibility, or growth, or development, or ingenuity, or adoption of a contemporary ­airspace environment that perhaps we haven’t even thought of yet,” he said.

“It can’t be yesterday’s paradigm, and what I see in the potential for OneSKY is the ability to open that avenue and make it contemporary.”
  
Speaking on another matter where ASA & the RAAF/Defence Dept. are seemingly joined at the hip, I note that on Monday 4 Corners takes a look at the disgraceful PFAS contamination issue at Defence Airports and facilities... Confused
Quote:



[Image: 9019836-16x9-large.jpg?v=2]

Image:


Four Corners
Contamination
 
Posted Thu 5 Oct 2017, 4:37pm
Updated Thu 5 Oct 2017, 4:37pm
Expires: Wednesday 6 October 2032 4:37pm
 
MTF...P2 Cool
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(10-06-2017, 09:08 AM)Peetwo Wrote:
Quote:


Update to 4 Corners 09/10 program - "Contaminated":

Quote:[Image: 9019836-16x9-large.jpg?v=2]

Image:


Four Corners
Contamination
 
Posted Thu 5 Oct 2017, 4:37pm
Updated Thu 5 Oct 2017, 4:37pm
Expires: Wednesday 6 October 2032 4:37pm


Defence admits three-year delay in warning people about toxic foam danger
Four Corners
By Linton Besser, Lisa McGregor and Jeanavive McGregor
Updated yesterday at 3:41pm

Video: Toxic foam contamination leaves families living in fear (ABC News)

The Department of Defence has admitted it should have warned the public about a chemical contamination scandal three years earlier than it did — and says the cost to taxpayers to clean up the problem nationwide will mount into the hundreds of millions of dollars.

Key points:
  • Defence admits it should have gone public about the dangers of perfluorinated chemicals three years before it did
  • The chemicals entered groundwater after being used at 18 bases around Australia
  • US authorities have warned of a "probable link" between the chemicals and cancer
Defence is now tackling perfluorinated chemical pollution — the source of which was the widespread use of firefighting foam — at no fewer than 18 Defence bases across the country.

At some, local drinking water has been contaminated.

Since at least 2000, scientific research has linked these chemicals to a range of human diseases, though the Federal Government's formal health advice says there is "no consistent evidence" they cause specific illnesses.

Now, a Four Corners investigation has confirmed Defence misused the toxic firefighting foam for decades.

Despite explicit warnings dating back to 1987 that the product must not enter the environment, many thousands of litres of the foam were expelled onto bare earth or washed into stormwater systems.

"There's no doubt about it, that the way we used these products in the firefighting airfields back in the 80s and 90s was not as good as it should have been," department deputy secretary Steve Grzeskowiak said.

Map: Defence Force contamination sites

He also agreed Defence had erred in hiding the contamination outbreak for more than three years from the people who live near the Royal Australian Air Force base at Williamtown in NSW.

"I think if we had our time again, should we have told the community back in 2012, from the middle of 2012? We probably should," he told the program.

Defence only revealed the pollution scandal to Williamtown residents in September 2015.
We asked what you thought the outcome of the chemical contamination would be. Take a look at the comments to see what our readers had to say.

Government stance on class actions a 'slap in the face'

[Image: 8121822-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
The source of the chemical pollution was the widespread use of firefighting foam. (CRC CARE)


The admissions will breathe new life into two separate class actions, representing almost 1,000 people, which accuse Defence of negligence and which seek financial compensation.

The Federal Government has so far lodged court papers defending its conduct in one of those cases, denying the claims for financial damages and maintaining Williamtown residents had run out of time to bring the litigation — even though Defence only told them about the contamination two years ago.

Ben Allen, a partner at Dentons, the law firm behind one of the actions, said this position by the Government was "a complete and utter slap in the face".

"They had no way of knowing about the problem prior to September 2015," he said.
Mr Grzeskowiak declined to comment on the court proceedings.

[Image: 9027738-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
Williamtown residents have been asked to follow precautionary advice to minimise their exposure to PFAS chemicals. (Four Corners)


No quick or easy solution

The toxic chemicals were critical elements of an aqueous film-forming foam called Light Water which was manufactured by 3M.

In May 2000, the company announced it was phasing out the foam and US authorities warned the Australian Government on the same day that the foam's key chemical ingredients "potentially pose a risk to human health".

Documents show Defence did not fully replace the 3M foam until July 2012.
In just the past year, Defence has spent about $10 million attempting to filter the perfluorinated chemicals (commonly grouped as "per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances", or PFAS for short) from stormwater drains leaving the Williamtown base and entering the surrounding suburbs.

But testing by Four Corners showed the PFAS chemicals were still at elevated levels three weeks ago in these stormwater canals; at Dawson's Drain, for example, laboratory analysis showed one of the PFAS chemicals flowing from the base at 18 times the safe drinking level.

[Image: 9027728-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
Dawson's Drain — one of the locations Four Corners tested water for contamination. (Four Corners)


The environmental scientist who ran a NSW Government inquiry that investigated the Williamtown contamination has told the program there was no way to "feasibly remediate" the site.

"You can treat some of the water in the drains, but there's several of those going off the base, and it's in the groundwater," Professor Mark Taylor said.

"It's just so expensive, it's so complicated … I don't think you really can. It's not a practical option."

Mr Grzeskowiak said the remediation was only just beginning and he couldn't identify when Williamtown could expect to be free of the pollution.

He also said he could not estimate the final cost of the clean-up.

He said that in the past five years, "the figure would be in excess of $100 million either currently expended or committed to be expended".

Asked if the final bill for taxpayers would be "in the hundreds of millions of dollars", he said: "I would say so."

Environmental impacts and 'probable' cancer link

Scientists have established that PFAS does not readily break down in the environment and accumulates in the food chain.

Elevated levels have been found in the blood of residents at Williamtown and Oakey in Queensland, which is home to an army aviation base.

The US Environmental Protection Agency says there is "suggestive evidence of carcinogenic potential" associated with the chemicals.

One major US study found a "probable link" to six diseases including two types of cancer.
There are, however, widely-acknowledged uncertainties in the science.

Experts have urged governments to protect communities now as the potential impact of exposure to the chemicals on human health becomes clearer.

[Image: 9027802-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
Residents of Williamtown hold the Defence Department responsible for the contamination. (Four Corners)


Defence has adopted what it describes as a "precautionary approach", supplying bottled drinking water to several communities including Katherine in the Northern Territory, where the town's aquifer has been contaminated as a result of intensive firefighting training on the nearby Tindal RAAF base.

Former Tindal firefighters have described to Four Corners the use of hundreds of litres a week of the toxic foam concentrate in normal training and testing regimes.

This training was so intensive that at Oakey, more than 900 litres of the foam concentrate was discharged every week, according to Defence documents.

Assistant Defence Minister James McGrath said in May the Government was considering compensation options including land acquisitions.

An announcement is yet to be made.

& from RN Breakfast:

Quote:Four Corners uncovers mass water contamination scandal Broadcast: Monday 9 October 2017 8:36AM (view full episode)

[Image: 9029222-3x2-340x227.jpg]

Image: Residents of Williamtown were not informed of the contamination until 2015. (Four Corners)


Twenty-three ADF bases are currently being investigated after harmful P-FAS chemicals from fire-fighting foam seeped out of Defence bases and contaminated surrounding areas.

The Department of Defence has admitted cleaning up the water contamination will cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars.

About a thousand citizens from Oakey in Queensland and Williamtown in New South Wales — whose water supplies were contaminated — have launched class actions against the Department of Defence.

The contamination has also impacted residents in the Northern Territory town of Katherine.


MTF...P2 Cool
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A thread worth the reading:-

There are stars;

Quote:
Just imagine a letter turning up to:

The Approved Aeronautical Data Originator,
Upper Kikatinalong Shire Council,
PO Box 1,
GAFFA.

Then there are super stars:-

It’s worse than that, LS. The letter probably says something like this:

Aeronautical Data Originator,
Upper Kikatinalong Shire Council,
PO Box 1,
GAFFA.

Airservices would like to continue to publish information about your aerodrome/HLS/ALA. Before you provide the information, and before Airservices publishes the information, please note the following:

You must appoint a single senior manager within your organisation as the AIP responsible person for your organisation. If you do not, you commit a criminal offence carrying a penalty of 50 penalty units.

If the person you appoint does not have knowledge and competence to carry out the responsibilities of an AIP responsible person, you commit a criminal offence carrying a penalty of 50 penalty units.

Equivalent requirements and offences apply to your NOTAM authorised person, if you have one.

You must provide Airservices with the name of the AIP responsible person (and your NOTAM authorised person, if you have one) and notify Airservices of any changes. If you do not do so, you commit a strict liability criminal offence carrying a penalty of 50 penalty units.

You commit a criminal offence carrying a penalty of 50 penalty units if you do not notify Airservices of the need to change aeronautical information, as soon as practicable after you become aware of the need.

The data or information you provide must be in accordance with specifications Airservices gives you, or you commit a strict liability criminal offence carrying a penalty of 50 penalty units.

You must review, at least annually, the data and aeronautical information published in the AIP for which you are responsible, keep a record of that review and provide a copy of the review to CASA on request. If you do not do so, you commit a strict liability criminal offence carrying a penalty of 50 penalty units.

Yours in aviation safety and love and kisses

Airservices Australia

Two quotes borrowed from the UP – saved us a little time and work: thank you gentlemen, both. Except to repeat Newton and his law of acceleration; seems Halfwit has his pedal to the metal – which is fine of course until you bump into something…

The acceleration of an object as produced by a net force is directly proportional to the magnitude of the net force, in the same direction as the net force, and inversely proportional to the mass of the object.

The third law states that for every action (force) in nature there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Now, you can’t be held to account for toxic pollution on an aerodrome which don’t exist; can you?- I rest my case M’lud….

“OK then, one for the road it is”.
Reply
Chalk, cheese & OneSKY fairytales - Blush

Before I give an update from last evening's Airservices Estimates session, I came across an interesting article from Canada's news publication the 'Globe and Mail':

Quote:Nav Canada's ambitious plan – a satellite network to track planes around the world
FR SUCR[/url]
[Image: big.jpg]

[url=https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/authors/eric-atkins]ERIC ATKINS

22 HOURS AGOOCTOBER 23, 2017
FOR SUBSCRIBERS


A SpaceX rocket launched this month from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base carrying 10 satellites destined for near-Earth orbit, part of Nav Canada's ambitious plan to wrap the globe in a digital net.
The full constellation of satellites, numbering 66 by the summer, will track airplanes and give air-traffic controllers the precise locations of aircraft flying over the 70 per cent of the world – oceans, mountains and remote areas – not covered by ground-based systems.

The system will be run by Aireon LLC, a venture of Nav Canada, the private non-profit company that operates the domestic civil air-navigation system. Nav Canada's partners on the project include satellite owner Iridium Communications Inc. and the air-navigation agencies of Italy, Denmark and Ireland. Another 24 national air-traffic authorities, including Portugal, Australia and South Africa, have signed up or made non-binding agreements to become customers when the system begins operating in 2018 or later, Nav Canada said.

With its network of satellites and ground stations, Aireon will transmit a plane's altitude, speed and direction to air-traffic controllers around the world, allowing aircraft to fly more direct routes with less distance between them.

This will save time, fuel and money and increase safety, says Neil Wilson, chief executive of Nav Canada.

"The signals give us real-time information as to where exactly the aircraft are," Mr. Wilson said. "That ability to know exactly where an aircraft is significantly enhances safety and enhances our ability to provide more efficient flight routes and altitudes that is going to save our customers a significant amount of money."

Vincent Capezzuto, Aireon's chief technology officer, said planes will be able to fly more closely together in such fuel-saving routes as the Atlantic jet stream. Traffic controllers currently leave safety bubbles of about 100 kilometres between planes over oceans because they cannot be sure of their locations. This separation could shrink to 15 kilometres.

Faster planes will be able to pass slower traffic safely; the data amassed on global traffic could be used to highlight trouble zones and alter flight paths that have traditionally followed landmarks or radar installations, Mr. Capezzuto said.

"Airspace was designed as a function of where the ground infrastructure was located. Aircraft usually followed rivers, mountains and power lines because they were visible from the air," Mr. Capezzuto said. "And what followed was radar and navigation aids – rotating lights and beacons, just like you have lighthouses for boats. Basically, you flew an indirect path to get somewhere because you follow these navigational aids. All that goes away. You don't have to think like that any more because we're looking at it from the flip-side – we're looking at it from space. Now you can fly from from point A to point B in a more direct path."

About 90 per cent of the world's planes are already fitted with the equipment that broadcasts their locations to ground-based receivers. But reception of the terrestrial towers does not extend more than a couple of hundred kilometres over oceans. "We take the same ground stations and we put them up on satellites," Mr. Capezzuto said.

With a territory that extends from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean and the North Pole, Nav Canada is responsible for 12 million aircraft movements a year, the second-highest total in the world. The North Atlantic stretch is the world's busiest airspace, with 1,200 daily flights to and from Europe.

Iridium says the system would have been able to find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which is still missing three years after disappearing on a flight between Kuala Lumpur and Beijing.

Nav Canada is Aireon's biggest shareholder with a $150-million (U.S.) investment. Nav Canada's non-profit status means any savings reached though the Aireon system will be passed along to its customers, airlines and pilots, Mr. Wilson said.

Executives at Nav Canada and Iridium said they are confident the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration will sign on as a customer, pointing to recent funding approved by Congress for work on the project.

The FAA and Aireon ran a successful test flight using the system in March, in order to compare it with ground-based data in areas with high traffic density and signal interference. In a statement, the FAA said Aireon has "huge potential for improving services for many around the world who lack some surveillance or advanced separation tools, and we are independently validating that their space-based ADS-B service meets FAA established performance requirements for broadcast surveillance."

The FAA did not respond to e-mailed questions on Thursday, Friday or Monday.

In addition to hosting the Aireon technology, the new satellites will replace the Iridium satellites that have been orbiting the Earth for 20 years. These are same satellites Iridium has been using to power its network of satellite phones and other devices. (Formerly backed by Motorola, Iridium's $1.5-billion bankruptcy followed the launch in the late 1990s.)

Space is hot right now, as billionaires Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Richard Branson race to commercialize space travel.

The Aireon system will undergo extensive testing before it can be proven effective. But some of the biggest risks the company faces begin right on the launch pad.

The satellites Iridium uses rockets owned by Space Exploration Technologies Corp., the company backed by Mr. Musk that has had two rockets explode since 2015.

None of the mishaps has involved Aireon equipment, but the risks are never far from the minds of the system's architects, most of whom have witnessed the launches first-hand.

"You build systems and then they have to survive that transport into space and they have to be ejected into where they have to go," Mr. Capezzuto said.

Each satellite is worth more than $30-million, including research and development. "If you want to multiply that by 10 for each launch you can see why I'm so nervous every time," Mr. Desch said. "There's a lot of satellites and costs riding on the top of a SpaceX rocket. That's why we built 81 [satellites] instead of just 66."

[Image: image.jpg]
FOLLOW ERIC ATKINS ON TWITTER @ERICATKINS2

Now compare that inspiring story of Nav Canada's innovative, visionary and world leading air traffic control systems; to the ASA CEO Harfwit's stumbling, shambolic response to Senator Gallacher's accusation that the OneSKY contract is nothing more than a 'fairytale' (03:45 minutes):





Big Grin Big Grin Confused Blush


MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
Further to the OneSKY fairy-tale - Big Grin

Via Oz Aviation:

Quote:Revised OneSky tender price under evaluation
October 26, 2017 by Gerard Frawley
[Image: 201600803raaf8165233_028.jpg]Defence has revealed that a new tender price for Australia’s ambitious OneSky program to acquire a joint civil and military air traffic management system is currently under evaluation.

Thales was announced as the successful supplier for the Airservices Australia-led OneSky project at the Avalon Airshow in February 2015. However, negotiations between Airservices and the French-headquartered aerospace and defence company have become increasingly protracted, and an Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) report published in April questioned OneSky’s value for money, suggesting Australia could end up paying too much for the project.

“In June last year they [Thales] submitted an offer based on their original tendered offer that had gone through a further negotiation phase,” Rear Admiral Tony Dalton told the Senate’s Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade committee on Wednesday evening.

“The assessment of that offer in June last year was it didn’t represent value for money,” RADM Dalton, who is now general manager ships at Defence’s Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG) but retains responsibility for Defence’s portion of the OneSky program, told the committee.

“There has been a degree of work done on that offer with Thales in the intervening period that culminated with a revised price being offered by Thales last month. That is currently under assessment.”

Defence’s share of the OneSky program is known as ‘Project AIR 5431 Phase 3 Civil Military Air Traffic Management System’, and was added to the government’s Projects of Concern list of Defence acquisition programs requiring special remediation, in August, a near unprecedented move for a program yet to be contracted.

RADM Dalton explained that the delay in signing contracts was one reason OneSky was added to the Projects of Concern list, and that further delays might force Defence to seek an alternative supplier to replace its existing Australian Defence Air Traffic System (or ADATS).

“Well certainly the timeframe has slipped. That’s been part of the issue and that’s why it’s been elevated to a Project of Concern,” RADM Dalton said.

“But inside our budget, we have some allowances to cater for the obsolescence emerging in the current defence system. That clearly is a concern for us and there is a finite amount of time that the process can go on before we have to look at alternatives.”
Further, RADM Dalton confirmed the cost of Defence’s share of the program could be higher than first expected.

“Our contribution to the overall OneSky program may need to increase. We have made some allowances in the revised Integrated Investment Program to accommodate for that increase. Our negotiations with Airservices have said that there’s a finite amount of money that we’re prepared to increase.

“Part of the discussions that we’ve had with Thales, through the Project of Concern process, has made that abundantly clear to Thales





MTF...P2  Tongue
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(10-26-2017, 05:53 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Further to the OneSKY fairy-tale - Big Grin

Via Oz Aviation:

Quote:Revised OneSky tender price under evaluation
October 26, 2017 by Gerard Frawley
[Image: 201600803raaf8165233_028.jpg]Defence has revealed that a new tender price for Australia’s ambitious OneSky program to acquire a joint civil and military air traffic management system is currently under evaluation.

Thales was announced as the successful supplier for the Airservices Australia-led OneSky project at the Avalon Airshow in February 2015. However, negotiations between Airservices and the French-headquartered aerospace and defence company have become increasingly protracted, and an Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) report published in April questioned OneSky’s value for money, suggesting Australia could end up paying too much for the project.

“In June last year they [Thales] submitted an offer based on their original tendered offer that had gone through a further negotiation phase,” Rear Admiral Tony Dalton told the Senate’s Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade committee on Wednesday evening.

“The assessment of that offer in June last year was it didn’t represent value for money,” RADM Dalton, who is now general manager ships at Defence’s Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG) but retains responsibility for Defence’s portion of the OneSky program, told the committee.

“There has been a degree of work done on that offer with Thales in the intervening period that culminated with a revised price being offered by Thales last month. That is currently under assessment.”

Defence’s share of the OneSky program is known as ‘Project AIR 5431 Phase 3 Civil Military Air Traffic Management System’, and was added to the government’s Projects of Concern list of Defence acquisition programs requiring special remediation, in August, a near unprecedented move for a program yet to be contracted.

RADM Dalton explained that the delay in signing contracts was one reason OneSky was added to the Projects of Concern list, and that further delays might force Defence to seek an alternative supplier to replace its existing Australian Defence Air Traffic System (or ADATS).

“Well certainly the timeframe has slipped. That’s been part of the issue and that’s why it’s been elevated to a Project of Concern,” RADM Dalton said.

“But inside our budget, we have some allowances to cater for the obsolescence emerging in the current defence system. That clearly is a concern for us and there is a finite amount of time that the process can go on before we have to look at alternatives.”
Further, RADM Dalton confirmed the cost of Defence’s share of the program could be higher than first expected.

“Our contribution to the overall OneSky program may need to increase. We have made some allowances in the revised Integrated Investment Program to accommodate for that increase. Our negotiations with Airservices have said that there’s a finite amount of money that we’re prepared to increase.

“Part of the discussions that we’ve had with Thales, through the Project of Concern process, has made that abundantly clear to Thales




ASA Hansard 23/10/17:

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/sear...nt=Default


MTF...P2 Tongue
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Concerned? – Damn right I am..

5.17.
The Projects of Concern list was established in 2008 to focus the attention of Defence and industry senior management on solving the issues required to remediate listed projects. Projects are put on the list when there are significant challenges with scheduling, cost, capability delivery or project management.12

The Gallacher question, posed at the very beginning of the video (00.05) drags Halfwit into a  serious place – ‘projects of concern’. The non response is a classic; as far as Halfwit is concerned it’s all good and he is going to contract by years end. Perhaps someone could take out the back, sit him down and explain, in simple terms, just how much bother he’s in and what he is staring down. He is part of serious governmental interest into the ‘One big pie’ scam and the trough of plenty. Lucky he has defence on side, without them I reckon O’Sullivan would cut him a new one and feed him the old.





Toot toot.
Reply
Harfwit & the Peter Principle - Blush

Extract from this week's SBG: A Tragic Situation Blossoming.

Quote:‘Promoted to a level of incompetence’; a phrased coined by L.J. Peter. “It states that the selection of a candidate for a position is based on the candidate's performance in their current role, rather than on abilities relevant to the intended role. Thus, employees only stop being promoted once they can no longer perform effectively, and "managers rise to the level of their incompetence".

[Image: 320-562761-42760056.jpg]

IMO for an even better example (than HVH) of the 'Peter Principle', one cannot go past the Airservices Board's glove puppet CEO Jason Harfield... Rolleyes





From the other Aunty today, here is further proof of the sheer incompetence of 'Electric Blue' Harfwit and his executive minions:  

Quote:Airservices Australia admits it did not 'consult sufficiently' over new Hobart flight paths
By Rhiana Whitson

Updated about 6 hours ago Mon 13 Nov 2017, 12:20pm

[Image: 9142074-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
Residents say the changes are like "living under a superhighway". (Supplied: Julie Smith)


Airservices Australia has admitted bungling the consultation process for a new Hobart arrival flight path over Dunalley, saying it was unaware the area was still recovering from the 2013 bushfires.

There's growing anger about the decision to introduce a singular flight path into Hobart airport and on Saturday, more than 100 people attended an information session held by the Federal Government-owned company to demand answers.

Previously, planes flying in and out of Hobart were dispersed over a number of flight paths but now they fly over Copping, Boomer Bay, Dunalley and Connelly's Marsh, before turning into the airport.

[Image: 9142014-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
The community meeting heard about alternative flight paths. (ABC News: Rhiana Whitson)


Airservices Australia southern operations manager Steve Clarke said the increase in the number of planes flying into the state and the availability of new technology meant a singular route was necessary.

"What we are doing is making it safer, because it is far more predictable and less complex, there is less air traffic controller intervention in the process," he said.

Residents at the meeting grilled Airservices staff, demanding to know why the change had been imposed on them without consultation.

Mr Clarke, who said the change would not result in air traffic control job cuts, added that Airservices Australia would review its internal procedures.

Quote:"I am here to acknowledge that we didn't consult sufficiently on these changes," he said.

"I can see that it's a close-knit community. They've been through some issues that we weren't aware of in terms of bushfire and other things. I have certainly heard their concerns."

Residents voiced concerns about the effect plane noise would have on tourism.
Tom Gray is starting a new business in the area but is considering pulling the pin because of the plan.

Quote:"No-one is going to want to get married under a flight path," he said.

"When you are trying to promote Tasmania's beauty, with its views, produce and serenity, I feel this will be majorly interrupted under 30 plus planes a day."

[Image: 9142008-3x2-700x467.jpg]

Photo:
New flight paths over the bushfire-affected communities in Tasmania have residents devastated. (Supplied: Tam Joy Jansen)


Resident David Patman obtained Airservices Australia documents under Freedom of Information laws.

He said they showed a discrepancy between what the company knew and what it wanted to say publicly.

The environmental assessment for the Hobart Airport flight path plan said there would be newly overflown areas, and recommended stakeholder engagement.

Quote:"The proposed changes may result in visual change to aircraft tracking and/or noise levels," the assessment said.

In contrast, a document containing communications briefing notes repeatedly instructed the company to tell Hobart Airport, Federal MPs, and residents that "the proposed flight paths will not overfly new residents".

Mr Patman said he was considering lodging a complaint against Airservices Australia with the Commonwealth ombudsman.

"It really concerns me that they have misled and provided false information in order to get this through," he said.

Quote:"The first we heard of it was 30 planes flying overhead a day."

Resident Rachel Deane said the community was still getting back on its feet after 2013 Dunalley bushfires.

"We are only just starting to recover from that, emotionally and physically and to have this imposed on us is like insult to injury," she said.

"We don't want to live under a super highway."

Airservices Australia is accepting feedback on alternative flight path proposals until November 19

While on the hot subject of this week's SBG ( i.e. top-cover experts the ATCB); I note that over on the UP Dick asks the question - on the ATSB clearly holds back Mt Hotham incident report - whether the ATSB is providing O&O topcover on behalf of ASA:

Quote:...I have started a new thread on this because after reading an article in The Australian this morning, and also the editorial, it appears that it is going to be at least two and a half years from the incident to when the report actually sees the light of day.


A summary of the incident can be seen on the ATSB website here: https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications...r/ao-2015-108/

How could a report about such a simple incident take so long?

Could it be that the original report recommends that Airservices use the radar properly at Mt Hotham (let’s say bring in a bit of Class E airspace) and no one can bring themselves to actually put this in writing, as it may confirm what others have been saying for years?

This is a rumour network. Does anyone have a factually based rumour on why the delay has been so great?

It is also interesting that the report on Richard Green’s fatal helicopter crash, now two years ago, has still not seen the light of day. It keeps getting put off and put off.

What is going on here? It would be fascinating to know...
 
And Old Akro follows that up with this:

Quote:...Duck Pilot, If you look at the throughput of reports over the last 2 months, its slowed to a dribble. Thats not consistent with high workload.


And they seem to be able to fit collaboration with other bodies and especially overseas authorities into their schedule.

More likely, they are completely absorbed to the point of apoplexy by high profile political cases like the Pelair one. You'd think that if the ATSB mess that up yet again, then they're history.

The Mt Hotham incident that Dick highlights is the one involving Max Quartemain & VH-OWN. My guess is that this has been placed on hold so they can make it align with the Essendon Airport accident investigation. Which you would have to say represents very questionable ethics.

The Mt Hotham airport report was already past due when the Essendon airport accident occurred. My personal unsubstantiated, biased reasoning is that any ATSB report that criticises AsA is very slow coming, and (as Dick pints out) there are some pretty big questions for AsA to answer in this incident. One of which is that AsA claimed to not have radar coverage of the aircraft and yet FlightAware did on its public web page.

I can imagine that the delay in the Mt Hotham report coupled with the Essendon accident puts the ATSB in a difficult position. If they criticise the pilot, then I can imagine there is a gaggle of lawyers warming up in the wings in the USA who will be itching to add the ATSB to the list of litigants...
Hmm...no comment - Rolleyes

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Airservices now 'match fit' and approaching a red dawn horizon - Dodgy

Quote:[Image: 5e0d588dd3daf3f6bd7e325b21b7de87?width=650]

The concept of "Red sky at night, shepherd's delight. Red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning" first appears in the Bible in the book of Matthew. It is an old weather saying often used at sunrise and sunset to signify the changing sky and originally known to help the shepherds prepare for the next day's weather.Jul 17, 2017

Red sky at night and other weather lore - Met Office
https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/le...y-at-night
ASA CEO Harfwit has been busy lately sprouting unadulterated bollocks - "nothing to see here move along" - at a couple of notable Alphabet soup talkfests:
Quote:[Image: 1UBXY5B1Z6QNA-1000x750.jpg]
News Item

Airservices presents at RAAA

27 Oct 2017
[/url]
Airservices Australia Chief Executive Officer Jason Harfield addressed delegates at the Regional Aviation Association of Australia’s National Convention this afternoon.

The two day convention is being held on the Gold Coast and brings together industry leaders, regional operators, technical experts, manufacturers, suppliers, government and other regulatory bodies.

During his address, Mr Harfield discussed the promises Airservices is now delivering through the Accelerate program, moving from an out-dated operating model to become a profitable, sustainable, more customer-focused organisation.

He also acknowledged the essential role regional aviation plays in nurturing health, connectivity, and opportunities for regional and remote Australians. As well as how Airservices will continue to protect and promote general aviation by continuing to waive charges for low volume general aviation operators.

Read a full copy of
Jason’s speech.


[Image: 49JDDNM8S3BN.jpg]
News Item

Airservices presents at AAA

15 Nov 2017

Airservices Australia Chief Executive Officer Jason Harfield addressed delegates at the Australian Airports Association National Conference this morning (15 November 2017).
The four day conference is being held in Adelaide and is Australia’s biggest annual aviation conference and exhibition attracting more than 600 delegates from the aviation and airport industry.

During his address, Mr Harfield discussed the importance of Australia’s aviation ecosystem working to its full potential with the support and input of many players including airports, airlines and Airservices.

Airservices Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM) project was also addressed during the presentation highlighting to delegates that A-CDM is about working with partners at airports and across the aviation ecosystem sharing information to boost operational performance.

Airservices Air Traffic Management Network Services Manager Paddy Goodall will be addressing delegates later today on harnessing information to enhance the aviation network.

Chief Fire Officer Glenn Wood will be presenting to delegates tomorrow (16 November 2017) on protecting the aviation industry, the true value of Airservices Aviation Rescue Fire Fighting Services.

Read a full copy of [url=https://newsroom.airservicesaustralia.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/385L2JVWW6YOCGKS.pdf]Jason’s speech.

If you can stomach the pony pooh emanating from these talkfest speeches then feel free to click on the links above... Confused

As a passing strange coincidence and seemingly in direct contradiction to the warm fuzzy diatribe from Harfwit; I note that in the Senate yesterday that the ToR for a RRAT committee Senate inquiry motion received bipartisan support... Huh

Quote:Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee
Reference
[Image: 231199.jpg] Senator URQUHART (Tasmania—Opposition Whip in the Senate) (12:17): At the request of Senators Sterle and O'Sullivan, I move:

That the following matter be referred to the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee for inquiry and report by 30 March 2018:

The operation, regulation and funding of air route service delivery to rural, regional and remote communities, with particular reference to:

(a) social and economic impacts of air route supply and airfare pricing;
(b) different legal, regulatory, policy and pricing frameworks and practices across the Commonwealth, states and territories;
© how airlines determine fare pricing;
(d) the determination of airport charges for landing and security fees, aircraft type and customer demand;
(e) pricing determination, subsidisation and equity of airfares;
(f) determination of regulated routes and distribution of residents' fares across regulated routes;
(g) airline competition within rural and regional routes;
(h) consistency of aircraft supply and retrieval of passengers by airlines during aircraft maintenance and breakdown;
(i) all related costs and charges imposed by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority; and
(j) any related matters.

[Image: 247871.jpg] Senator O'SULLIVAN (Queensland) (12:18): I seek leave to make a short statement.

The PRESIDENT: Leave is granted for one minute.
[Image: 247871.jpg] Senator O'SULLIVAN: I want to thank the Labor Party for their cooperation and support for the development of this reference, which will be, of course, under the chairmanship of Senator Sterle. This is a very important reference. I am speaking out now to our crossbench colleagues to pay attention to this and support it. This is about trying to bring equity into the cost impacts of regional airline movements for our people in regional Australia, not just my home state of Queensland. We've got some very atrocious examples of gouging where it costs up to $2,000 for people to travel the same distances it costs them $78 to travel between the metros, including people who require constant medical attention and are having to go to the cities. This has to be brought to an end, and we hope this committee reference will take us some way towards being able to make recommendations to government about changes.
Question agreed to.
   
Interesting times ahead me thinks... Rolleyes
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Harfwit forced to backtrack on YMHB STAR duck-up - Blush

Via Hobart's Mercury Wink

Quote:[Image: bc5bdd89a3bfd81d7b4568da50850865?width=1024]Changes to flight paths into Hobart Airport raised the ire of Forestier Peninsula residents, forcing a review of the changes.

Four options in Airservices Australia review of flight paths into Hobart Airport

ALEX LUTTRELL and PATRICK GEE, Mercury
November 20, 2017 8:45pm

A DECISION on flight paths over southern Tasmania is expected on Wednesday, with four possible alternatives put forward after a review.[/font]

Since last month Airservices Australia has been reviewing flight path changes into Hobart Airport that were made in September.

The changes would have resulted in up to 50 planes a day flying over Boomer Bay, Dunalley and other Forestier Peninsula towns.

MORE: FLIGHT PATH BACKLASH FORCES RETHINK

Airservices Australia said the changes were made to organise aircraft movements on to standard routes, but backtracked and announced it would examine possible alternatives.

As part of the review, the authority has revealed four possible flight paths, with a decision expected during a meeting at Hobart Airport on Wednesday morning.

MORE: NEW FLIGHT PATHS PROMPTS PETITION FROM RESIDENTS


The alternatives are:

1 CONTINUE with the same path over the Forestier Peninsula.
2 A PATH over Connelly’s Marsh and Sloping Main similar to the previous approach.
3 PLANES flying from the east of Maria Island and between Dunalley and Murdunna, for flights arriving from Sydney and Brisbane
4 A ROUTE  over Kettering, Oyster Cove, Snug and Bruny Island as an approach for planes arriving from Melbourne and Adelaide.

[Image: 60b45d38bea6ce871850eea73bc527c8?width=650]

A map showing the areas of possible new flight paths into Hobart Airport.


The final two alternatives would require Airservices Australia submitting a proposal to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, which could take a year to process because of environmental and community assessments. If the two proposals failed to get through CASA, the first two options would be used.

Bream Creek’s Joan Ward estimated up to 700 people were affected in the Sorell area and more in the Tasman Peninsula area.

Ms Ward said there were 300 signatures on a petition to be lodged to Federal Transport Minister Darren Chester calling for changes.

“Airservices Australia have changed the goalposts a couple of times and they’re not giving us accurate information in terms of the reasons,” she said.

“First off they told us the reason was for safety. Then it was fuel efficiency [and] now the latest thing is a navigation beacon has been moved and now we’re told it’s been put back. We want the flight paths reversed back to what they originally were.”

[Image: 9f5a05e1699dc0772daf991f7e0a2dcc?width=650]

Joan Ward, of Bream Creek, says hundreds of people in the South are affected by the new flight paths. Picture: MATT THOMPSON


Airservices Australia said on its website that a report of the review would be published on Wednesday.

“The report will set out the alternatives ... and the reasons why each was determined,” the company said.

“It will also contain a summary of the issues raised in the community feedback and complaints.”

A REVIEW of flight paths options over southern Tasmania has revealed four possible options — including one trajectory over North Bruny Island.
Since last month, Airservices Australia has been reviewing flight path changes into Hobart Airport made in September.

The changes would have resulted in up to 50 planes a day flying over Boomer Bay, Dunalley and other Forestier Peninsula towns, concerning residents.
Airservices Australia said the changes were made to organise aircraft movements on to standard routes, but backtracked and announced it would investigate alternative paths.

The company has now revealed four possible flight path options:

1 CONTINUE  with the same path over the Forestier Peninsula;
2 ESTABLISH a path over Connellys Marsh;
3 DIRECT path from east of Maria Island and between Dunalley and Murdunna as an eastern approach;
4 OVER  North Bruny Island as a western approach.

Airservices Australia will announce its decision at a meeting at Hobart Airport on Wednesday at 10am.

Poor DDDDDarren, the triple-Ps (Peter Principle pigeons) continue to come home to roost - Big Grin

[Image: animals-homing_pigeon-homing_bird-carrie...15_low.jpg]

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