Senate Estimates - 2017-18.
Hell hath no furies like a thirsty P7.

It is becoming more apparent, by the day, that there is a not so subtle, blatant even, miniscule directive to ‘cool’ the Estimates down. Far too much dirty washing (and laundered money) with half washed skid marks hanging out for the media to spot. It is all so very politically sensitive at the moment, all things considered.

They tried this flummery on with Skidmore – and it bloody near worked too; ‘cept he was  bit too limp wristed to be believed for very long – some of the people some of the time etc.. Now we have what was a very effective RRAT committee transmogrified into soothing ‘bedtime stories’ read by Mama O’Sofullofit; at the ministers request?

I call bullshit; and, of those of that committee who did not have one single question – using the ‘Montreal’ alibi get out of goal card – last used by whispering John, now invalid: should hang their collective heads in shame.

You know; I’d wear Fawcett not turning up; I’d countenance Sterle being needed at some big deal union show; Gallacher is his own man and has much to deal with – valid no show card – there are others, from both sides of the house who could have attended the Barry O’ show. I am only left with the slim hope that, as honourable men, they wished to have no part of the ministerial charade and would want to help (if allowed) put some very serious matters aeronautical to bed. Flimsy top cover miniscule – practically non existent. I seriously (even devoutly) hope that you do not consider this last Estimates pantomime of the clowns as ‘enough’. It is a very small thumb you have jammed into a huge dam holding back a tidal wave of anger, frustration and economic hardship, not to mention the ever present spectre of prosecution on a whim.

You would be a fool deceived if you believed that the likes of Qantas and Virgin were ‘ecstatic’ or even remotely happy with the Act and Regulations as they stand. The rules are senseless, incomprehensible, designed to ensure swift, safe prosecution, with prejudice, as and when it suits. The big companies bottom line would improve overnight by at least 15% if they could cast off the leaden weight of ‘compliance’; do not believe, not for a moment, that they would not tacitly support significant change, while serving you lunch in first class.

The message is clear – reform the regulator, change the Act and get some sane, sensible rules in place – save the nation a fortune (in indigestion remedies for a start). Ministers come and go – but the beat goes on – forever. Ask DDDDDD – Darren, for he greatly offended Aunt Pru and finished up in the orchestra pit with the other Banjo players.

That’s all – yes; yes, I know where the keg is child – and I shall expedite the transaction.

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"But the ICC nailed it" - Duplicity in process.. Rolleyes  

Sorry to rain in on the excellent, insightful, no punches pulled P7 post, however I need to rewind once again to the P9 Secura fulsit post:

Quote:["[the] complex procedures CASA specify are often not complied with".

But then Patrick has (again) dropped the ball (if he ever had a firm grasp) – the ALAEA failed to brief him properly, Patrick never got a match to the fuse, and BoS tapped it into touch just as the whistle blew.  Failed Senators – failed. Definitely no Choc Frogs for that piss poor effort.

For practical men, under pressure to get a flight ‘out’ – off the stand, the ‘risk’ associated and procedures involved are too bloody silly for words. That tyre was (a) acceptable or; (b) too bad to be used. End of. Enter the political dragon, armed with excuses and back door passes.

Primarily - the ALAEA plot back-fired. O Sofullame couldn’t keep his trap shut, distracted Patrick; and then, not only aided but abetted an easy exit for the Kool Aid team. Then peace, understanding and fellowship prevailed. Hallelujah and praise the gods of get out of jail free cards. Indeed, I am all astonishment... 

"...Patrick has (again) dropped the ball..."  - After reading the tabled 'Letter from the Industry Complaints Commissioner regarding CASA complaints' (PDF 2830KB) I totally agree and second the motion that Senator Rex has criticallly fumbled the ball in front of the goal, at a time when he had the whole field to himself -  Blush

To put it in context how much of a missed opportunity it was, the whole passage in the ICC letter leading up to the quote (in red above) needs to be regurgitated:


[Image: ICC-quote.jpg]

...wasn't completed in accordance with...

...did not follow both the CSM and Surveillance policy.. 

Hmm...why do those lines sound so familiar... Huh

(Hint: see HERE & HERE)

Now compare the alleged handling of the CASA surveillance visit to Townsville to say the attempted embuggerance of FalconAir; or indeed (links above) the embuggerance of DJ; or the embuggerance of Airtex - just for starters... Dodgy 

"...That tyre was (a) acceptable or; (b) too bad to be used..."

On the tyre damage:


[Image: damaged-tyre.jpg]

       

Do you seriously call that a shredded, totally U/S tyre - seriously?  Rolleyes

The following pics are of 2 totally shredded U/S tyres that I can confirm were both very much 'within limits' (i.e serviceable) prior to the incident landing: 


[Image: Picture001.jpg]


[Image: Picture002.jpg]


Note these were the skidmarks from that incident which caused the damage to the two tyres:


[Image: Picture017-1.jpg]

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The threshold in view is RW 08 at YMEN and in the background lies the Tullamarine freeway.

Ironically CASA also investigated this incident, with the investigation outcome being totally obfuscated/white-washed (by a certain Worthless FOI) to pretty much the same degree as the QF YBBN incident - again CASA oversight duplicity in process... Dodgy 


MTF...P2  Cool
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Clever Lad P2…

Good job P2 – glad you posted ‘the letter’ from the iCC. I asked ‘K’ why he had gone after a Patrick muffed chance – twice. Read the ICC say’s he, so I did. It’s a bit rich when industry must sweat blood over every spelling mistake in a manual; or, something not done to CASA’s liking; or, gods forbid a wrong date or some other heinous crime. But CASA can and do as they please, there are literally hundreds of episodes where CASA have (a) failed to comply with their own procedures, (b) used a subjective interpretation of a small part of a manual to facilitate and expedite their agenda or pre determined conclusion and © ignored everything in their own protocols except the bit that suits. Oh yes; they'll stone you.

If anyone in government ever was remotely interested why CASA is distrusted and disliked they’d only need to read the MCConvict’s preface to the infamous Enforcement Manual to garner a fairly severe case of disgust. That has been valid now through two CEO’s and Carmody ain’t in a rush to change it.

The ICC nails it down with a feather duster; time he bought a proper man sized hammer; a bloody big one.

Time to plod back through the garden to the workshop fridge and liberate a sextuplet from her sisters; quiet, cold and it’s nearly a full moon – Awooow!!
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Chair O'Obfuscation pleads ignorance on perceived COI on matters aviation Dodgy  

Via 'that man' in the Oz today:

Quote: Senator denies MH370 conflict of interest

[Image: cf0ba7142aa0d989baba2c9ad3be63f7?width=650]

Coalition Senator Barry O'Sullivan. Picture: AAP
Nationals senator Barry O’Sullivan has admitted he failed to ­declare he was part-owner of a company which for three years after Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 went down sought business from plaintiff law firms ­including those representing MH370 victims’ families.

But the Queensland senator insists he never knew the company was created in 2014, had no involvement with it, and records show it never traded and obtained no clients.

While there is no suggestion of a conflict of interest, Senator O’Sullivan chairs the Senate’s rural and regional affairs and transport legislation committee, some of whose members last week grilled the Australian Transport Safety Bureau over its failed underwater search for MH370.

Labor senator Murray Watt said, “Senator O’Sullivan must say why he failed to declare this interest to the Senate”, and Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick, who is a member of the committee, said Senator O’Sullivan should also make a statement to its members.

MH370 disappeared in the southern Indian Ocean on March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board, having deviated 40 minutes into its scheduled flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with its radar transponder off and radio contact broken.

Senator O’Sullivan yesterday said that after inquiries from The Australian, he had determined one of his family companies had had a 50 per cent shareholding in Asia Pacific Claims Management, which was registered on the Australian Business Register from September 2014 to November 2017.

APCM’s website, which was still operating last week but ­appeared to be down yesterday, said “we have assisted in all types of aviation accidents”.

Under a heading “current cases” it lists MH370 and Air PNG 1600, and has a photograph of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with the caption “Flight 370”.

The website says: “We specialise in providing independent ­advice and assistance to individuals, estates and corporations affected by aviation accidents around the world where civil litigation and claims for compensation are ­involved.”

Senator O’Sullivan said his shareholding in APCM was a legacy of a claims-adjustment investigation business dealing with aviation accidents that he had run up until about 2008.

When he was running for preselection in 2013, he said, his ­accountants started separating his financial interests in 30 companies.
Finally the lid may have been lifted and someone maybe paying attention to what AP has noted for quite some time, references: 
Chair O'Obfuscation top-cover for ATSB & CASA cont/-
On chasing tales and washing spots 
Don’t pay the Ferryman.

But why stop there (i.e MH370)?

"..Senator O’Sullivan said his shareholding in APCM was a legacy of a claims-adjustment investigation business dealing with aviation accidents that he had run up until about 2008..."

Isn't the potential for many at least 'perceived conflict of interests' when you consider the clients that sit on both sides of the fence of aviation accident investigations and insurance claims/cases?

 For example let's use the case of QF 72... Rolleyes

From ETB travel news:


Quote:Wisner Law Firm deployed agents from Asia Pacific Claims Management (APCM) to recruit 15 of the 38 Singaporeans who were on board recently joined the group made up of approximately 100 passengers, Today Online reported.

Last month the pilot flying the plane also joined the action group.

APCM Director Barry O’Sullivan said people are not aware that they are able to seek compensation without physical injury.   

Read more at http://australia.etbtravelnews.global/101864/action-group-on-qantas-qf72-expands-worldwide/
  
So have these QF 72 compensation cases been settled? 
And what about the perceived incestuous relationship between the LNP/National Party and PelAir. The parent company Rex just so happens to have a former National party leader John Sharp as one of its Directors. Plus PelAir are apparently still arguing the toss with some of the victims claims for compensation? Yet BO did not recuse himself from any committee Estimates deliberations on the PelAir MKII cover-up report?
PelAir disconnections: Of guilty consciences; &/or legacies?

Quote:As many on here would be aware back in February certain PAIN members - which included P7, KC and DJ - attended a private RRAT committee meeting that was supposedly meant to be an opportunity for PAIN to brief the Senators on our assessment/opinion/review of the 500+page, multi-million dollar costed Pelair MKII Final report. History will now show that the requested Senate RRAT committee briefing was in fact hi-jacked by none other than the Chair Barry O'Obfuscation.... [Image: dodgy.gif]


However it was also pointed out to me that in the course of the hijacked briefing KC mentioned several times the deficiencies in both the Montreal convention and the uniquely deficient regulations surrounding air ambulance operations in Australia. Yet never at anytime did the Chair indicate he had invaluable prior professional exposure to international aviation insurance law in this area??
  
Hmm....standby for incoming me thinks -  Confused

MTF...P2  Cool
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Barry O’bullshit guilding the Lilly

The bloated Colonel Sanders lookalike speaketh with forked tongue. I call bullshit!!!

Barry’s ‘chestnut’ moment includes these beauties;
- ‘I forgot to mention it’’.
- The family has many businesses, it’s their fault.
- But but the business isn’t earning money.
- It’s the lawyers fault, they should’ve tidied up loose ends.

All bollocks tubby, and all non-excusable. Your failure to declare a conflict of interest or ‘perceived’ conflict of interest is no excuse. You broke (and continue) to break Parliamentary percunary rules. You should be removed immediately from any involvement with aviation matters in the Senate. IMMEDIATELY.

What’s next - perhaps we will find out that Barry O’bese has business interests with I.Ron Bar and Herr R. Collins??

TICK TOCK
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GD _ “What’s next - perhaps we will find out that Barry O’bese has business interests with ‘I. Ron Bar and Herr R. Collins??”

But, but GD – that would take the connection back to Lockhart River; surely not – but wait. What’s this I see before me – a connection? No, can’t be; and yet.............!

Best get two in Son, P2 will want the research done before that man ‘Iggins fires the second ranging shot. What’s the rule – one under, one over and then, one fair up Khyber? Something like that rings a little bell.

Bravo that man Iggins (and his editors, lawyers and research team) Choc frogs all around.
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O'Obfuscation and APCM disconnection -  Huh

Just a couple of points on the BO statements in that article:   

BO -"...said his shareholding in APCM was a legacy of a claims-adjustment investigation business dealing with aviation accidents that he had run up until about 2008..."

Yet here BO was making this comment from the 11 October 2010 ETB travel news article (see link above): 

"..APCM Director Barry O’Sullivan said people are not aware that they are able to seek compensation without physical injury..."

And here BO was declaring donations to the QLD Electoral Commission, on behalf of APCM to the newly minted QLD LNP in March and August 2009:


[Image: BO-1.jpg][Image: BO-2.jpg]
 

[Image: BO-3.jpg]
[Image: BO-4.jpg]



Next little discrepancy was when BO said:

"...Senator O’Sullivan yesterday said that after inquiries from The Australian, he had determined one of his family companies had had a 50 per cent shareholding in Asia Pacific Claims Management, which was registered on the Australian Business Register from September 2014 to November 2017..."

Yet off the ASIC record two of BO's declared Family Companies would appear at one time to have held a combined total of 90% shareholding in APCM Corporation PTY LTD:


Quote:[Image: APCM.jpg]
 
Oh well I'm sure BO has a plausible explanation -  Rolleyes
MTF...P2  Cool
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My Oath.

“There is no difference in legal force between an oath and an affirmation. The basic difference is that oaths conclude with the phrase ‘So help me God!’ while those making an affirmation are required to  solemnly and sincerely affirm and declare.”

You can, quickly and easily find many examples of an Oath or a ‘Plight’. Folks have been doing it for donkey’s years now, since pagan times, in all walks of life. It is a fine principal, however, despite the words spoken aloud, in front of witness it still boils down to a matter of conscience and personal integrity. Back in the day, when men of good will were actually worried that ‘their’ god was watching and listening, an oath sworn probably meant that mostly, it was kept. Then they discovered that their god was not a lawyer and that in properly trained legal hands, there were ways to wriggle around the purpose and intent of the oath sworn. The gods rarely trouble mankind these days – but lawyers do.  

This situation presents a problem for the citizens of a nation; where an oath is sworn by those who hold the reins of power over the well being of the nation. The oath sworn is not warranted and compliance is not a guaranteed certainty. The democratic process periodically allows the populace to decide if a political candidate has kept, or is likely to keep the oath sworn and promises made. There are many yardsticks available to measure this, but “Action is eloquence”. Watching deeds and actions is a slower pathway, both patience and time are required, for the most part those investments are rewarded with a very clear picture.

"I like not fair terms and a villain's mind."

We have all watched with attention and patience as the aviation agencies have been harried into the covets; badgered into revealing the facts and hounded to reveal where the money has actually gone and what benefit the Australian public has gleaned from those massive investments. It has not been a picture of idyllic progress; quite the reverse in fact. Before the O’Sullivan era began, there was some progress toward accountability, hard won yards in the battle to reform matters aeronautical; but the great worn tyre debacle sounded the death knell of meaningful reform. Unless the RRAT committee can regain their grip and focus; the reform fiasco and the multiple millions annually wasted on the same will continue, unabated and even encouraged by a weakened, co-opted, to even appearing captured last line of defence for an ailing industry. And yet, those same folk have sworn an oath and been given tiles, the question is will they honour the oath sworn?

It is not titles that honour men, but men that honour titles.”

Toot – toot..
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Mirror, mirror on the wall.
Who's the dodgiest of ‘em all?

P7 and I walking home last evening, as usual it’s a fairly quiet affair, then sotto voce he asks the mirror question.

No way to answer that straight off the bat; but it made me think. We’d done more listening than talking at the BRB – P2’s research into the ICAO rort had centre stage and there were a couple of chaps who actually understand the ICAO compliance racket fielding questions and trying to explain it all – fascinating stuff. Inevitably, ASA, ATSB and CASA were brought in to the mix as the ICAO ‘stuff’ affects them all. Much to mull over; I digress.

We walked along in silence for a minute or so, then the answer to P7’s riddle came to me. “the Senate Committee” says I. The ‘construe boy’ look was my answer; “compare”. "Well" says I, “the last estimates ASA session video with the Edwards interlude”. “In one you have a serious committee, at full throttle, asking difficult questions, no messing about, they were onto the games and determined to put a stop to them; what happened to that and why?”
















Chalk, cheese and no contest; disappointing ain’t it.

Toot - toot...
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Sterlo on shipping industry decimation; & the Jones Act? 

In the Senate yesterday Sterlo vented his spleen on the 'nothing to see here, nothing to fix' Govt response to a Senate RRAT committee inquiry report. It is even worse because this time the Govt response doesn't even pretend to be concerned by the findings and basically rejects all the recommendations... Dodgy  

Quote:



Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee


Government Response to Report

Senator STERLE (Western Australia) (18:08): I wish to comment on the government response to the Rural, Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee report entitled Increasing use of so-called Flag of Convenience shipping in Australiaand move:

That the Senate take note of the document.

The government has finally come back with, let's say, a response. This inquiry had gone on for about 18 months. It was a very interesting inquiry by the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee. Senator O'Sullivan and I found ourselves at many meetings on this important topic. It started with, I think, a report by Four Corners or one of those shows—it was a couple of years ago—on a ship, the Sage Sagittarius, an infamous ship, which was crewed by foreign workers. I say at the outset so that everyone is clear that, at every stage of this inquiry, I had nothing against foreign workers, but I get pretty cranky when they are brought in and exploited, and they replace Australian jobs. I make no apology for that—never have, never will. Aussies must come first. It's pretty simple. I'd love to hear that side agree with me.

They won't. They all just look down at their iPads or their iPhones and hope to Christ that no-one was listening and I won't single them out, but I won't single them out because they're all just as guilty as each other.

The Sage Sagittarius had Captain Salas, the Filipino captain. He is notorious. He has admitted to being a gun runner. On his watch, there were two deaths at sea on this ship: Filipino seafarers. Then there was one death when the ship was unloading back in Japan. The owners of the ship had put in a detective working under—what do you call it?

Senator Scullion: Cover.

Senator STERLE: Undercover, yes, thanks—and somehow, mysteriously, when the ship berthed when it was unloading, unfortunately, he was killed. We're still waiting to find out what the heck happened there. Anyway, that was the crux of it.

I'm just going to quickly go through this. There are some significant recommendations. I have spoken many, many times about this issue in many forums and many times in this place, so I won't go over much old ground, but the committee—and this was a unanimous report—put, I think, about seven or eight recommendations to the government. We said, 'This is what needs to be done.' You must remember that, back in 1992, there was a similar inquiry into ships of shame. I'm sad to inform the Senate and all those poor devils out there listening that nothing has changed.

We have a government that are doing their best—come charging down and attack me, every member of the coalition, if you think I'm lying—and doing everything they can to see the demise of the Australian shipping industry. I've said it many times. No-one has ever yelled at me and said I'm making it up, because that's what they're darn well doing. They can lie through their eyeteeth about how good they are and how they're looking after Aussies and—what was the catchcry?—jobs and growth. That's as long as they're not Australian jobs and as long as it's not in the Australian shipping industry. Where the hell are all our seafarers going to come from—our masters, our skippers, our captains? Where the heck are all our hardworking seafarers going to come from? I'll tell you where they're going to come from with that mob, the LNP, over there: they'll come from Libya, the Philippines, Iran or whatever it is. Unfortunately, that's where it's heading.

And they're not alone. They've got partners in crime. I'll tell you right now: you can put BP and Caltex in that. We used to have Australian seafarers on Australian ships plying their trade between our ports. Not anymore, people. It's all done by foreign seafarers, and that lot over there think it's great, because that lot over there think they're doing a fantastic job. One of my recommendations—it was the committee's, but I chaired it—I want to share with everyone listening. Recommendation 1 was:

The committee recommends that the Fair Work Ombudsman implement a program of inspection for ships with foreign seafarers, to verify that the wages paid on board accord with Australian legal requirements.

We're not making something up. That is what's supposed to happen. What was the response from the government? There was another recommendation I want to share too, and then I'll give you the response. The committee also recommended:

… that the Australian Government provide adequate funding to the Fair Work Ombudsman to implement an inspection program of ships with foreign crews, to assess the payment of wages.

That's pretty simple, not hard at all.

This was the government's response, everyone: 'The Australian government does not support these recommendations.' But here's the rub: 'Furthermore, the government considers that the current arrangements for compliance in the maritime sector are sufficient and the Fair Work Ombudsman is adequately funded to support these arrangements.' Crap. Let me just give you a couple of examples. Geez, I tell you: it's really hard to control myself when I start talking about the shipping industry being torn apart and Australian jobs being exported. Then they lie. Then they can't even tell the truth. They expect us to believe that they're doing this? Let me just give you a couple of classic examples here.

In December last year, there was a ship, a Bahamas-registered vessel called the Diana, which pulled up in Melbourne. The ITF did what they normally do. They got on board. Lo and behold, they found out that this Australian company owns the Diana: Canada Steamship Lines Australia—CSL. Yes, what a great company they are! I really have got my tongue firmly planted in my cheek. In fact, when I pull my tongue out, they're far from a decent Australian company, because they are absolutely guilty of underpayment of wages. The ITF found out. The ITF are prosecuting them. They are an Australian company that have replaced Australian seafarers with foreign seafarers and foreign ships. They're getting ably assisted by that lot over there. CSL Australia also have the vessels AcaciaAdelie and Diana. You know what? What a great Australian company CSL are, because they're even refusing to sign industrial agreements so their workers can be paid Australian wages and conditions! So, Government, there's one of your mates that's out there rorting it and got caught out.

Here's another one. This is why they're telling us the Fair Work Ombudsman is funded well and they're doing a great job. They're not. This goes back to April last year. This is right in the heart of the inquiry. ITF, the International Transport Workers' Federation, lassoed the Aussie charterers of:

… a Norwegian shipping company that was allegedly—

or not allegedly; in the end, that's what they did—

paying its foreign crew a pitiful—

are you ready for this?—

$1.25 an hour while working in Australian waters.

This mob of jokers over there is trying to tell the committee, who worked their backsides off talking to the industry about the deficiencies that have been around for many years—rehashing Ships of shame,from 1992—that there is nothing to see. This is typical of LNP ministers: 'Tuck it under the desk and hopefully no-one will talk about it.' Well, we're going to keep talking about it.

So let's have a look at what they did while they were ripping off these foreign workers in Australian waters. The Fair Work Ombudsman launched an action against a mob called Transpetrol TM, claiming it underpaid no fewer than 61 foreign crew members—here we go!—a total of $255,000 when they worked on the oil tanker MT Turmoil in Australian waters between 2013 and 2015. That is carting BP's and Caltex's products around, because BP and Caltex—yes, the fuel mobs who can't wait to rip into Australian motorists at every opportunity; talk about cartels!—replaced Australian manned ships, as I said earlier, with a chartered Norwegian owned ship. I have to tell you that it just irks me. These are only a couple of examples.

I can go through all these recommendations and, lo and behold, the government doesn't accept any of them. They try to rub a little bit of salt in the wound by telling me, when we are going further, about making sure that environmentally and industrially everything is Mickey Mouse. It's not Mickey Mouse. I'll talk about that too. Here's another one. There was one I saw recently, a couple of weeks ago. Eighty-odd containers fell off a ship coming into Sydney. It was a Liberian registered ship. So what? I'll tell you so what. It was heavy seas. Yes, we know these sorts of things happen. They fell off before midnight, but it was 11 o'clock the next morning before AMSA, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, was even notified. I can tell you now: there is no way known that an Australian crewed or Australian owned ship or Australian seafarers or an Australian captain would have waited 11 or 12 hours before they thought they might decide to let AMSA know.

I'll have a lot more to say about this. I will seek leave to continue my remarks. I'm not going away. It is an absolute disgrace in our nation that the LNP government under Mr Turnbull, and previously Mr Abbott, cannot wait to wave goodbye to the Australian shipping industry, Australian seafarers and Australian ships. I've got to tell you: the Americans have the Jones Act, and it's about darned time that we had the same act—I don't care what name you call it. It's about time that we started building Australian owned, Australian built, Australian crewed ships, with Australian seafarers, Australian skippers and the whole lot. I have a lot more to say. I seek leave to continue my remarks later.

Leave granted; debate adjourned.




For those interested here is the Google, Wikipedia and WP entries for the USA's 'Jones Act':

Quote:Section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act is known as the Jones Act and deals with cabotage (coastwise trade) and requires that all goods transported by water between U.S. ports be carried on U.S.-flag ships, constructed in the United States, owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed by U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents.

Merchant Marine Act of 1920 - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merchant_Marine_Act_of_1920



[Image: HRT5P7WZNUYBVJ73PX5LOOP2PQ.jpg]

The Jones Act and the perils of political ignorance - The Washington ...

Washington Post
The previously little-known Jones Act has been in the news recently because its restrictions on the use of foreign ships to carry cargo between American ...

Yet another dragged out and expensive WOFTAM Senate RRAT Inquiry finally completed with little to no chance of effective reform and as a consequence another transport industry faces the risk of further economic decline - FDS!  Angry



MTF...P2  Cool
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The game of Government obsfucation is a skilful one that has been crafted for over a century in the Westminster system. A system designed and managed by crooks, liars, and the most dishonest and inept human beings known to man. I’m not surprised by the maritime result nor the Governments manipulation of the system. Ultimate power with an endless tap of public money, the best Barristers and the power to crush and thwart.
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To true Gobbles, coming to an airport near you as well, everyone should
start to learn Mandarin or at least "singlish".

Now we know our Primary Airports are not permitted to be owned by a foreign entity, according to the Airports Act.
So how come the head lease holder on KS Sydney resides in the Bahamas?

We all know that the Airports act reserved secondary Airports for aviation use, much like our National Parks are reserved
for recreational use. It was also not allowed for property sharks to own leases on these airports.

Passing strange how much non aviation commercial development is planned or completed at secondary Airports, even down to closing runways and other Airport facilities to facilitate commercial development, and we thought the head leases said the airports must be retained and maintained in their original condition.

Almost two thirds of BK airport is at threat for Non Aviation commercial development.

It is also illegal according to the Act for a trust to own an airport.

Is a superannuation fund not a trust?

A development shark in the gun for a secondary airport development modus operandi, was to develop regardless, apologise
profusely when caught out in breach, pay a insignificant fine, then get on with making their millions because their project was so far advanced it was impossible to stop it. Anyone complain? Those that tried hauled into court until they ran out of money.

A few hundred thousand into a politicians election fund quickly soothed any political opposition.
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I reckon ‘Sterlo’ has got it. It makes sense that he should – trucks, now boats and of course aircraft = all same – same, similar problems. What a minister for transport he would make. He has proven fearless, demonstrated intelligence and; more importantly ‘a firm grasp’ of the fundamental problems. Shiny bums sitting on plush seats in Can’tberra making the big decisions - ain’t got the same hands on experience of the industry as drivers – airframe, big rig or; boats have. Sterlo actually understands it - ducking amazing:but bravo.

Don’t much care who runs the country – but, if Albo can steal the march and promises to put Sterlo a minister for transport – well! I may even start to use the title Minister. Gods know my old moggy has more brains, backbone and integrity than the current miniscule; and could probably do a better job of vermin control, Darren 7D target #1.

Can you imagine how a real Minister would get things sorted – Oh be still my beating heart.

My shout boys – I’ve just had a happy thought (first in a long while). Get to it Albo; go hard…Hells bells – I may even vote this time – perhaps.
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(06-20-2018, 11:50 AM)Peetwo Wrote: Sterlo on shipping industry decimation; & the Jones Act? 

In the Senate yesterday Sterlo vented his spleen on the 'nothing to see here, nothing to fix' Govt response to a Senate RRAT committee inquiry report. It is even worse because this time the Govt response doesn't even pretend to be concerned by the findings and basically rejects all the recommendations... Dodgy  

Quote:



Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee


Government Response to Report

Senator STERLE (Western Australia) (18:08): I wish to comment on the government response to the Rural, Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee report entitled Increasing use of so-called Flag of Convenience shipping in Australiaand move:

That the Senate take note of the document.

The government has finally come back with, let's say, a response. This inquiry had gone on for about 18 months. It was a very interesting inquiry by the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee. Senator O'Sullivan and I found ourselves at many meetings on this important topic. It started with, I think, a report by Four Corners or one of those shows—it was a couple of years ago—on a ship, the Sage Sagittarius, an infamous ship, which was crewed by foreign workers. I say at the outset so that everyone is clear that, at every stage of this inquiry, I had nothing against foreign workers, but I get pretty cranky when they are brought in and exploited, and they replace Australian jobs. I make no apology for that—never have, never will. Aussies must come first. It's pretty simple. I'd love to hear that side agree with me.

They won't. They all just look down at their iPads or their iPhones and hope to Christ that no-one was listening and I won't single them out, but I won't single them out because they're all just as guilty as each other.

The Sage Sagittarius had Captain Salas, the Filipino captain. He is notorious. He has admitted to being a gun runner. On his watch, there were two deaths at sea on this ship: Filipino seafarers. Then there was one death when the ship was unloading back in Japan. The owners of the ship had put in a detective working under—what do you call it?

Senator Scullion: Cover.

Senator STERLE: Undercover, yes, thanks—and somehow, mysteriously, when the ship berthed when it was unloading, unfortunately, he was killed. We're still waiting to find out what the heck happened there. Anyway, that was the crux of it.

I'm just going to quickly go through this. There are some significant recommendations. I have spoken many, many times about this issue in many forums and many times in this place, so I won't go over much old ground, but the committee—and this was a unanimous report—put, I think, about seven or eight recommendations to the government. We said, 'This is what needs to be done.' You must remember that, back in 1992, there was a similar inquiry into ships of shame. I'm sad to inform the Senate and all those poor devils out there listening that nothing has changed.

We have a government that are doing their best—come charging down and attack me, every member of the coalition, if you think I'm lying—and doing everything they can to see the demise of the Australian shipping industry. I've said it many times. No-one has ever yelled at me and said I'm making it up, because that's what they're darn well doing. They can lie through their eyeteeth about how good they are and how they're looking after Aussies and—what was the catchcry?—jobs and growth. That's as long as they're not Australian jobs and as long as it's not in the Australian shipping industry. Where the hell are all our seafarers going to come from—our masters, our skippers, our captains? Where the heck are all our hardworking seafarers going to come from? I'll tell you where they're going to come from with that mob, the LNP, over there: they'll come from Libya, the Philippines, Iran or whatever it is. Unfortunately, that's where it's heading.

And they're not alone. They've got partners in crime. I'll tell you right now: you can put BP and Caltex in that. We used to have Australian seafarers on Australian ships plying their trade between our ports. Not anymore, people. It's all done by foreign seafarers, and that lot over there think it's great, because that lot over there think they're doing a fantastic job. One of my recommendations—it was the committee's, but I chaired it—I want to share with everyone listening. Recommendation 1 was:

The committee recommends that the Fair Work Ombudsman implement a program of inspection for ships with foreign seafarers, to verify that the wages paid on board accord with Australian legal requirements.

We're not making something up. That is what's supposed to happen. What was the response from the government? There was another recommendation I want to share too, and then I'll give you the response. The committee also recommended:

… that the Australian Government provide adequate funding to the Fair Work Ombudsman to implement an inspection program of ships with foreign crews, to assess the payment of wages.

That's pretty simple, not hard at all.

This was the government's response, everyone: 'The Australian government does not support these recommendations.' But here's the rub: 'Furthermore, the government considers that the current arrangements for compliance in the maritime sector are sufficient and the Fair Work Ombudsman is adequately funded to support these arrangements.' Crap. Let me just give you a couple of examples. Geez, I tell you: it's really hard to control myself when I start talking about the shipping industry being torn apart and Australian jobs being exported. Then they lie. Then they can't even tell the truth. They expect us to believe that they're doing this? Let me just give you a couple of classic examples here.

In December last year, there was a ship, a Bahamas-registered vessel called the Diana, which pulled up in Melbourne. The ITF did what they normally do. They got on board. Lo and behold, they found out that this Australian company owns the Diana: Canada Steamship Lines Australia—CSL. Yes, what a great company they are! I really have got my tongue firmly planted in my cheek. In fact, when I pull my tongue out, they're far from a decent Australian company, because they are absolutely guilty of underpayment of wages. The ITF found out. The ITF are prosecuting them. They are an Australian company that have replaced Australian seafarers with foreign seafarers and foreign ships. They're getting ably assisted by that lot over there. CSL Australia also have the vessels AcaciaAdelie and Diana. You know what? What a great Australian company CSL are, because they're even refusing to sign industrial agreements so their workers can be paid Australian wages and conditions! So, Government, there's one of your mates that's out there rorting it and got caught out.

Here's another one. This is why they're telling us the Fair Work Ombudsman is funded well and they're doing a great job. They're not. This goes back to April last year. This is right in the heart of the inquiry. ITF, the International Transport Workers' Federation, lassoed the Aussie charterers of:

… a Norwegian shipping company that was allegedly—

or not allegedly; in the end, that's what they did—

paying its foreign crew a pitiful—

are you ready for this?—

$1.25 an hour while working in Australian waters.

This mob of jokers over there is trying to tell the committee, who worked their backsides off talking to the industry about the deficiencies that have been around for many years—rehashing Ships of shame,from 1992—that there is nothing to see. This is typical of LNP ministers: 'Tuck it under the desk and hopefully no-one will talk about it.' Well, we're going to keep talking about it.

So let's have a look at what they did while they were ripping off these foreign workers in Australian waters. The Fair Work Ombudsman launched an action against a mob called Transpetrol TM, claiming it underpaid no fewer than 61 foreign crew members—here we go!—a total of $255,000 when they worked on the oil tanker MT Turmoil in Australian waters between 2013 and 2015. That is carting BP's and Caltex's products around, because BP and Caltex—yes, the fuel mobs who can't wait to rip into Australian motorists at every opportunity; talk about cartels!—replaced Australian manned ships, as I said earlier, with a chartered Norwegian owned ship. I have to tell you that it just irks me. These are only a couple of examples.

I can go through all these recommendations and, lo and behold, the government doesn't accept any of them. They try to rub a little bit of salt in the wound by telling me, when we are going further, about making sure that environmentally and industrially everything is Mickey Mouse. It's not Mickey Mouse. I'll talk about that too. Here's another one. There was one I saw recently, a couple of weeks ago. Eighty-odd containers fell off a ship coming into Sydney. It was a Liberian registered ship. So what? I'll tell you so what. It was heavy seas. Yes, we know these sorts of things happen. They fell off before midnight, but it was 11 o'clock the next morning before AMSA, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, was even notified. I can tell you now: there is no way known that an Australian crewed or Australian owned ship or Australian seafarers or an Australian captain would have waited 11 or 12 hours before they thought they might decide to let AMSA know.

I'll have a lot more to say about this. I will seek leave to continue my remarks. I'm not going away. It is an absolute disgrace in our nation that the LNP government under Mr Turnbull, and previously Mr Abbott, cannot wait to wave goodbye to the Australian shipping industry, Australian seafarers and Australian ships. I've got to tell you: the Americans have the Jones Act, and it's about darned time that we had the same act—I don't care what name you call it. It's about time that we started building Australian owned, Australian built, Australian crewed ships, with Australian seafarers, Australian skippers and the whole lot. I have a lot more to say. I seek leave to continue my remarks later.

Leave granted; debate adjourned.




For those interested here is the Google, Wikipedia and WP entries for the USA's 'Jones Act':

Quote:Section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act is known as the Jones Act and deals with cabotage (coastwise trade) and requires that all goods transported by water between U.S. ports be carried on U.S.-flag ships, constructed in the United States, owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed by U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents.

Merchant Marine Act of 1920 - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merchant_Marine_Act_of_1920



[Image: HRT5P7WZNUYBVJ73PX5LOOP2PQ.jpg]

The Jones Act and the perils of political ignorance - The Washington ...

Washington Post
The previously little-known Jones Act has been in the news recently because its restrictions on the use of foreign ships to carry cargo between American ...

Yet another dragged out and expensive WOFTAM Senate RRAT Inquiry finally completed with little to no chance of effective reform and as a consequence another transport industry faces the risk of further economic decline - FDS!  Angry



MTF...P2  Cool

I reckon ‘Sterlo’ has got it. It makes sense that he should – trucks, now boats and of course aircraft = all same – same, similar problems. What a minister for transport he would make. He has proven fearless, demonstrated intelligence and; more importantly ‘a firm grasp’ of the fundamental problems. Shiny bums sitting on plush seats in Can’tberra making the big decisions - ain’t got the same hands on experience of the industry as drivers – airframe, big rig or; boats have. Sterlo actually understands it - ducking amazing:but bravo.

Don’t much care who runs the country – but, if Albo can steal the march and promises to put Sterlo a minister for transport – well! I may even start to use the title Minister. Gods know my old moggy has more brains, backbone and integrity than the current miniscule; and could probably do a better job of vermin control, Darren 7D target #1. 

Can you imagine how a real Minister would get things sorted – Oh be still my beating heart.

My shout boys – I’ve just had a happy thought (first in a long while). Get to it Albo; go hard…Hells bells – I may even vote this time – perhaps.

- P7
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Statements by Senators 20 June '18: Sterlo on yet more industry advocacy.

Via Australian Senate:
Quote:



Music Industry

John Lennon Educational Tour Bus


[Image: e68.jpg]


Senator STERLE: This may come as a bit of a shock to most of you in this place, but I don't have a musical bone in my body—I'm an old truckie after all, so that's fair enough! But I did grow up in the era of the hard rock pub bands of the seventies and the eighties. I was a long-haul truckie, driving between Perth and Darwin and to all ports in between for over 11 years. This meant that I had a heck of a lot of time on my hands, as I went through the years, to listen, firstly, to the radio, then to cassettes and then, in my later trucking years, to CDs.

When I was in my truck, driving the length and breadth of this magnificent country, I used to think I could pull off a pretty good Bon Scott impersonation, and I still do—I might do it for you later on tonight! Back then, if there was a radio station in range, you could hear the likes of Skyhooks, Sherbet, Renee Geyer, AC/DC, John Paul Young, Marcia Hines and many, many other legends of the Australian music industry. As the hundreds of thousands of miles clocked up, there was also AC/DC, Hunters & Collectors, Australian Crawl, Rose Tattoo, Divinyls, INXS, Cold Chisel, The Angels, Men at Work, 1927, Kylie Minogue, Tina Arena and many, many more artists who contributed to the rich Aussie music heritage.

As I travelled the country, I used to see posters advertising the performances of those bands and performers in towns across our nation. Many of them became household names. Those bands were part of the fabric of Australia. They went out to conquer the world alongside our sporting teams, businesses, arts and cultural acts of the seventies and the eighties. Sadly, we are not seeing that anymore. Why aren't we hearing and seeing acts to replenish those household names? Bands and solo artists have contributed to the Australian musical identity and the economy in an enormous manner over the last 50 years, and we cannot afford to lose that status on the world stage.

I go back to the 17 singles from the US rapper versus three singles from Aussie artists on the Top 40 chart. It seems like the desire of all the corporate radio networks to expose any new Aussie music comes down to the competitiveness of the very much changed business in today's internet age, where music is delivered in many, many ways.

As we sadly have no Countdown anymore, maybe the government can give our artists a radio station that will play their music 24 hours a day, seven days a week, whether they be 16 or 60, regardless of their music styles. As all the corporate radio companies are calling out right now for licensing fee relief, I've got a suggestion for the Prime Minister and the Minister for the Arts, Senator Fifield. How about you provide that on the proviso that they must and must only play new Australian music? Think about that. The more you play, the less you pay. I bet London to a brick that that'll get the money men loving Aussie music again.

I'm going to take this opportunity to call on all Australians to take a minute to email or call your local member of parliament to tell them, 'We want you to support our Aussie artists and new Aussie music.' The challenge goes out to Australia. Let our music and talent lead us to another great era for the Australian music industry.

I'm going to now move to my other favourite topic and I want to share with the chamber in the remaining minutes that I have an exciting project I have been working on for well over 18 months now. I had the opportunity through a very dear friend of mine, Mr Robbie Williams in Perth, a legend of the Australian music industry that goes back to the '70s with Michael Chugg, Michael Gudinski and others. Robbie asked me if I had heard of the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus, to which I replied, 'Absolutely not.' Robbie suggested I should probably Google it and meet him down at the Leopold Hotel in Bicton Sunday arvo at two o'clock for a cold one. And I did. This bus is an unbelievable state-of-the-art, not-for-profit mobile recording studio. But that's just the start of it.

I went to New York. It was arranged that I could meet up with the CEO and co-founder, Mr Brian Rothschild. I went to Kaufman Astoria Studios in New York. I saw the bus. I got on the bus. I met with students who were on the bus playing their music. The whole concept is that schoolkids can get on the bus when the bus gets to their school. They can write a song, they can write stories and they can record—there are all the musical instruments there—and by two o'clock in the afternoon it's up on YouTube and the whole world can see what these kids have done. Brian gave me a bit of a surprise, because he had one Yoko Ono Lennon waiting. She wasn't waiting for me—she was doing an interview—but I happened to be out the front like a schoolkid waiting to meet the great Yoko, and I did. I asked Yoko, if we could get a bus to Australia, if she would launch it.

So my fingers are crossed that we can get this darn bus built. Talk has gone on too long now; it's time to deliver. It will prick your ears—and a lot of people in this place know about it because I haven't shut up about it—to hear that it will tour Australia. There is a budget put together, and we're off and running. I have recruited these musical legends Michael Chugg, Michael Gudinski and Mark Pope—and Mark's resume is as long as Chuggie's and as long as Michael's—to work with us. But I also thought, 'I need to do this properly and I need to do it where it is apolitical and can deliver the best outcome for our kids in rural and regional Australia, giving our kids the opportunity to tell their stories, record their music, write their songs and anything else that goes with it.' That's before I start on cultural advantages that will come with this as well.

So we've joined up with another legend—well, legend in his own lunchbox, but I say that quietly because he had a crack at me yesterday!—in Senator Barry O'Sullivan. I wanted to make this across the chamber. I went to Senator O'Sullivan because he is rural. I know his commitment to kids goes without saying. Senator O'Sullivan and I are working on this with Michael Chugg, Michael Gudinski, Mark Pope and, of course, Brian Rothschild in the US.

I will have a lot more to say about the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus. I have put the proposal wide in this building. All we're asking for is a measly sum of money to build this magnificent project. We don't want anything else. The philanthropic and business worlds will fund this. There's a lot of talk going on. But I am putting the plea to the government for the price to build this bus, to get it rolling on the highways and the byways of Australia and to roll it out to our rural and regional communities to give the kids who live outside the cities a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get on this state-of-the-art bus and write, play and record their music. I have spent many, many days rolling through the Kimberley showing it to the kids—Aboriginal kids and non-Aboriginal kids. How they would love to have a bus like this coming through their communities; it's overwhelming. I have not had one negative word.

So, on that, my plea is out there to the government to get behind Senator O'Sullivan and me and to get behind our music legends, who are putting their hard-earned time into this project for free because they are passionate about it. As I said in the contribution that I made earlier: we cannot let the Australian music industry die. This is what we have done. For people of my ilk, it is criminal that we don't have Countdown for Australian music.
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Quote:P7: ...Don’t much care who runs the country – but, if Albo can steal the march and promises to put Sterlo a minister for transport – well! I may even start to use the title Minister. Gods know my old moggy has more brains, backbone and integrity than the current miniscule; and could probably do a better job of vermin control, Darren 7D target #1... 

Now here's a thought: How good would it be if Sterlo, with the grudging support of Sen Barry O'Obfuscation, was to give a similar passionate speech in support of the smaller end of town aviation businesses and industry, as the Minister responsible for Transport under a Albanese led labor government - well I can dream can't I? Big Grin   


MTF...P2  Cool
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