Senate Estimates - 2017-18.
Stirlo’s theme song - Big Balls

Well nobody can say that Stirlo never got his hands dirty. Driving across Australia in a big rig during the 70/80’s was gruelling. Still is. I just hope that he added Black Sabbath, Uriah Heap, Motörhead and Deep Purple to his playlist.

Just for you Stirlo, because you actually do have a set. Cheers;



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Dear GD – I’ll see your Ac/DC and raise you a Kenneth Williams.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1011338203742294016
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 Budget Estimates Report & QON list Rolleyes

For those remotely interested the diligent committee Secretariat has managed to compile the Budget Estimates report:


Quote:2018-2019 Budget estimates

Report
2018-19 Budget estimates - (PDF 180KB)
     
The report states that answers to the QON are due by this Friday, yet historically the due date is very rarely complied with. A quick look at the QON list would appear to show there is not going to be any change in precedence this time - see HERE - with not one QON answered at this time... Dodgy  

Now although this expensive taxpayer funded Parliamentary Q&A process - treated by the Mandarins and their minions as nothing more than a petty irritation to be treated with disdain and the use of all manner of bureaucratic obfuscation tactics to totally avoid answering the questions honestly and transparently - the following is a couple of QON of minor interest to certain sectors of the IOS fraternity... Wink

Quote:Question on notice no. 193

Portfolio question number: 297
2018-19 Budget estimates
Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee, Infrastructure, Regional
Development and Cities Portfolio

Senator Jonathon Duniam: asked the Airservices Australia on 22 May 2018—
Airservices stated in its evidence that it complied with its obligations under the EPBC
Act when implementing the new paths. However, according to the Air Noise
Ombudsman's report, Airservices said that its 'environmental assessment' report
should not be considered as a record of its decision-making process in this regard.
Please provide a record of the environmental assessment decision-making process
which demonstrates how Airservices met its legal obligations to determine the
significance of the impact of the new flight paths within the meaning of the EPBC
Act.


Question on notice no. 194

Portfolio question number: 298
2018-19 Budget estimates
Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee, Infrastructure, Regional
Development and Cities Portfolio

Senator Jonathon Duniam: asked the Airservices Australia on 22 May 2018—
Airservices stated in its evidence that the number of 'go arounds' (missed approaches)
had reduced by 5 compared with the same period in the previous year to illustrate that
safety has been improved by the new paths. However, I understand that Airservices
does not classify go-arounds as a safety breach. For example, regarding go-arounds, I
note that its website states 'This standard manoeuvre does not constitute any sort of
emergency or threat to safety'. Please advise why you used these incidents as a
measure of safety performance. Regarding the period you used as the baseline for
comparison of go-arounds at Hobart in your evidence, is it the case that construction
works had made the runway approximately 500m shorter at that time, thereby
increasing the likelihood of go arounds, making this an inappropriate comparison?


Question on notice no. 195

Portfolio question number: 299
2018-19 Budget estimates
Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee, Infrastructure, Regional
Development and Cities Portfolio

Senator Jonathon Duniam: asked the Airservices Australia on 22 May 2018—
From safety data obtained from Airservices under the Freedom of Information Act, I
note that there appears to have been a pattern of aircraft failing to meet the
appropriate height requirements of the new paths (particularly SIDs) , including the
two 'loss of separation' and one 'loss of separation assurance' incidents referred to in
your evidence. These appear to involve different types of aircraft and presumably
different airlines. Can you confirm whether all of these incidents are 'pilot
attributable' and if not, please provide the cause of the incidents from September 2017
to March 2018 Can you also please provide dates and explanations of similar
incidents (i.e. where an aircraft has failed to comply with the height requirements of
the SIDs or STARs) post-16 March 2018.



Question on notice no. 207


Portfolio question number: 236
2018-19 Budget estimates
Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee, Infrastructure, Regional
Development and Cities Portfolio
Senator PATRICK:  asked the Civil Aviation Safety Authority on 22 May 2018

Senator PATRICK: So these photographs are of the state of a tyre for a Qantas aircraft that landed in Brisbane. It was transiting through Townsville, this was in
2016, and the log of events shows that, due to insufficient manpower available to
carry out the wheel change, the aircraft was sent on: 'The tyre may continue in service without safety concerns but must be replaced at the next check.' The bottom line is that there were not enough engineers on the ground to change the tyre, so they sent the aircraft on to the next location-possibly under commercial pressure; I don't understand the reasons why. But you would I'm sure appreciate, Mr Carmody, the seriousness of having an aircraft take off with a tyre in that state, noting in extremis the Concorde, when it took off from Paris, shed a tyre which went through the fuel tanks, with a tragedy at the end of that. So I suspect you would be concerned about an aircraft that might take off with a tyre like that?

Mr Carmody: I'm aware of the matter because it was 18 months ago. It's been referred to us. It's been referred to the Industry Complaints Commissioner, and the Industry Complaints Commissioner has reviewed the matter. So it's gone through our internal processes. I will make a couple of points: I saw the document, which hasn't been tabled but which you read out, that the tyre was released. So an engineer certified that the tyre was okay. I don't know,therefore, what damage occurred on subsequent landing. I assume that's not take-off damage; that's landing damage. An engineer certified it was suitable for take-off.

Senator PATRICK: I've talked to a number of engineers who have suggested that that
sort of damage to a tyre couldn't happen on a single landing; you might get an isolated  location; the point of the two photographs is they show that it's all around the tyre. But, in general, would that not concern you at all?

Mr Carmody: I was concerned, but, as I said, the matter was raised, it went to the independent Industry Complaints Commissioner and it was reviewed. So, as far as I'm concerned, any matters have been resolved.

Senator PATRICK: That's noted.

Mr Carmody: There is a completely independent mechanism; it's independent of me.

CHAIR: I appreciate that. I often have a plumber come to my house and the tap is still leaking afterwards. If that's the case, then I'd be concerned about the independence or the attention paid by an independent-

Senator PATRICK: Can I just stop, because I think there is a step in the middle that you are missing. That is that this gets investigated by CASA, and in this instance it was. There were concerns over the investigation and it then went on to the
complaints commissioner. The role of the complaints commissioner is not to conduct
an investigation. The complaint was that CASA had not conducted its job properly.

Mr Carmody: So it was investigated by CASA and it was then peer reviewed by
another office, so a different part of the organisation, to see whether the investigation
was well founded, which we do quite often in contentious cases. We put inspectors
from a different location on to review the matter so that we have a different set of
eyes-an independent set of eyes. That was done in the process. Then it went to the
industry complaints commissioner.

CHAIR: We could spar around all day here-I hope I don't mow your lawn, Senator-I'd like you to take on notice to supply the committee with the entire file, cover to cover: any artefacts; any photographs; any interviews, whether audio or otherwise; any files that are held, IT, however it does. You know the drill. From A to Z, supply it to the committee so that we can have a look at this.

Mr Carmody: Certainly, Senator....

Senator Scullion: Can I just get a point of clarification. For the interests of completeness, the body is slightly independent from you. So thematerial of the committee you are going to provide includes their deliberations as
well?

CHAIR: Absolutely. Senator Scullion: Just for clarification. CHAIR: Thank
you for that, Minister-A to Z.

MTF? - Probably not...P2  Dodgy
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Of used by dates and bib and braces

Veteran Queensland senators Ian Macdonald and Barry O'obsfucation have been dumped by the LNPoo for new faces. It seems the party is getting tired of old and decrepit has-beens  whose only contribution is eating sandwiches in the Parlousment House cafeteria and running to the shitter every 10 minutes to squeeze out just one lowly piss droplet!

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-06...ed/9949760

Hey Barry you ignorant old toss-pot, as you say goodbye to Malcolm don’t bang the door on the way out. Fool.

P7 - And so say all of us.
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ANAO to (potentially) audit the three stooges -  Confused  

From the Mandarin, on this financial year's ANAO proposed audit program, it would appear that the Dept's aviation safety agencies are potentially slated for individual scrutiny... Rolleyes  


Quote:Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities

Potential
  • Administration of regulation by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority

  • Efficiency of the airport master plan approval process

  • Efficiency of the investigation of transport accidents and safety occurrences

  • OneSKY contractual arrangements

  • Regional Jobs and Investment Packages

  • Western Sydney Airport procurement activities
  
Now that the BO roadblock is soon to be removed, it has been reported from the Wagga summit, the Senate RRAT committee has committed itself to a renewed vigor of providing (non-partisan) Parliamentary advocacy for the aviation industry... Wink  

Maybe in the interest of providing surety of this new commitment, the committee as a point of priority could ensure the top four on the 'potential' list (above) are referred by the committee to be completed ASAP.

For the benefit of Sandy -  Big Grin , I also find it interesting that one of the ANAO 'key areas of focus' for 2018-19 is...


..Value for money and transparency of the operations of government business enterprises..


  
MTF...P2  Cool
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Mount Gambier, TREX and a man for all seasons - John Sharp?  Dodgy  

Yawn -  Sleepy 

Have just spent half a day monitoring the air routes Senate Inquiry public hearing held today at Mount Gambier - see program HERE. Mostly mundane until the REX segment which featured none other than Mr Teflon himself - former miniscule John Sharp: 

[Image: Di0wtgCV4AAbnw6.jpg]

Sharpy today was in fine form and tackled much of the questioning from Sterlo & committee et.al with the typical aplomb we would expect from a current REX company Deputy Chair and former Govt miniscule... Dodgy 

Anyway when the Hansard is published I'll ensure there is a link because there was much interesting banter on many significant subjects, including the airline vs airport bun-fight and the pilot shortage. 

Also standby, because apparently REX & Sharpie will be making another appearance at the upcoming Sydney inquiry hearing. However in the meantime for the record here is a link for the REX submission: http://auntypru.com/wp-content/uploads/2...35_REX.pdf

Hmm...this is interesting -  Rolleyes  :



[Image: REX-135-1.jpg]

[Image: REX-135-2.jpg]



Next an update to the BO MH370 potential COI saga. The following is a link for the just tabled ' Register of Senators Interests':  
  1. Senators’ Interests—Register of senators interests incorporating statements of registrable interests and notifications of alterations lodged between 1 January 2018 and 30 June 2018, dated July 2018. [Received 20 July 2018]
 

If you scroll down to page 179 you'll come across this declaration from Senator BO to the Usher of the Black Rod:



[Image: BO-in-denial.jpg]



Hmm...IMO still doesn't add up but at the end of the day who cares because it would appear that BO has been given the flick anyway:

Quote:STATEMENT FROM THE FEDERAL NATIONALS ON SENATOR BARRY O'SULLIVAN

[color=rgba(23, 23, 23, 0.9)]Leader of The Nationals Michael McCormack has acknowledged Barry O’Sullivan’s service in the Senate on behalf of the party.
“Senator O’Sullivan is a tremendous advocate for Queensland, especially willing to stand up and fight for rural and regional Queenslanders,” Mr McCormack said.
“Since joining the Senate in 2014, he has championed issues on behalf of farmers such as drought policy and rural banking and finance.
“He has also held a number of important positions for The Nationals during his Senate service.
“These include being The Nationals Whip in the Senate and Co-Chair of the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee and References Committee where he has provided invaluable input and insight into inquiries concerning policy issues critical to the Australian agricultural sector including the Murray Darling Basin and other areas such as regional air services.
“Senator O’Sullivan is a warrior for the bush dedicated to the LNP who has always gone into fight and look after those people who needed a voice.
“Among his achievements included being instrumental in establishing the Royal Commission into banking with the impact on farmers and rural lending practices, his prime motivation.”
In acknowledging Senator O’Sullivan’s record of service, The Nationals would also like to congratulate businesswoman and long-serving party member Susan McDonald for winning pre-selection at number two on the Queensland LNP Senate ticket.
The Nationals would also like to acknowledge others who have won pre-selection for the Queensland LNP Senate ticket today representing a strong field of candidates for the next federal election, to continue fighting for the best interests of Queenslanders.
“We look forward to Susan McDonald being a considerable force representing Queensland and the interests of regional Australia,” Mr McCormack said.
Deputy Leader of The Nationals and Senate colleague Bridget McKenzie said she sincerely thanked Senator O’Sullivan for his service for Queensland.
“There has been no better fighter for the bush,” Senator McKenzie said.
“Senator O’Sullivan has shown tireless support for the Australian beef industry, the sugar industry and farmers in the grips of drought and natural disasters, especially those in rural Queensland.
“He is also been integral in supporting improvements to vital services for rural and regional Australians such as the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia. “He has made a significant contribution to the Senate, the nation and The Nationals and am confident he will continue to do so.
[/color]

MTF...P2  Cool
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In the wake of the Senate air routes inquiry -  Dodgy

Via the Oz today:

Quote:When regional fares cost the earth … and more

The Australian

[Image: eb0b3c80306d2a5721d48323003f5620?width=650]

“When our friends and family came to town for Sean's funeral, some of them travelled from New Zealand and still paid more to fly from Brisbane to Mount Isa ...


The crippling fares charged for ­regional air services have left ­towns bitter about the corporate muscle of Australia’s major airlines.

Residents of places such as Mount Isa, Cloncurry, Weipa, Kununurra and Newman feel they are being held to ransom for living in a remote place, and being forced to pay thousands of dollars in airfares if they wish to travel any significant distance. It is not unusual for fares ­between destinations such as Mount Isa and Townsville, or Weipa and Brisbane, to cost more than fares from Sydney to Los Angeles.

The issue is the subject of a ­Senate inquiry co-chaired by Queensland senator Barry O’Sullivan, but Mount Isa mother of three Emma Harman is sceptical about what the inquiry will achieve.

In late March, Mrs Harman’s husband, Sean, died in a car crash she blames on the high cost of airfares on regional routes.

Faced with an exorbitant bill to fly their son from Mount Isa to Sydney where he was to board the Young Endeavour, the Harmans opted to drive 1200km to Cairns and pay a much lower fare to Sydney. Just over 200km from their destination, Mr Harman, 43, swerved to avoid animals on the road and their vehicle careered into a tree.

His wife and three children survived but he was killed. Yesterday, his grieving widow said she felt compelled to speak out because airfares and services on regional routes “needed attention”.

“When our friends and family came to town for Sean’s funeral, some of them travelled from New Zealand and still paid more to fly from Brisbane to Mount Isa then they had for the first leg of their trip,” Mrs Harman said. “They were horrified.”

She said in nine years of living in the town, airfares had remained consistently high at the same time as the aircraft had deteriorated.

“We pay high Qantas or Virgin Australia fares, then we get Alliance planes that are really old,” Mrs Harman said. “There’s no in-flight entertainment, the food is substandard and sometimes the planes don’t even turn up.”

It is a view shared by her state member, Rob Katter, who is frustrated at seeing remote communities treated as second-class citizens by airlines. “We’ve had families taking out personal loans to get to funerals,” Mr Katter said.

“A lady who works for me in the office, her kids often make sporting teams but they have to say no, because they can’t afford to send them away. There’s so many stories like that.”

He said the federal government should compel airlines to ­reveal more about their pricing.

Senator O’Sullivan said the Senate inquiry was looking for evidence of price gouging and other behaviour for which airlines could be held accountable.

“We’ve seen, for example, where through inclement weather a particular highway is cut, and the airfare doubled until the road opened up again,” Senator O’Sullivan said. “That would appear to be a classic example of (airlines) taking advantage of the circumstances of more remote communities.”

Airlines would have the opportunity to front the inquiry in due course, and provide more details about their pricing models, he said.

Qantas’s submission to the inquiry rejected the perception that regional routes were high-yielding or lucrative for the airline.

“The cost of operation for a ­regional flight is always higher per passenger than on services between capital cities,” said the submission by Qantas group executive Andrew Parker. “With fewer passengers and frequencies to distribute costs, it is difficult to achieve efficiencies on regional routes.”

Virgin’s submission said ­regional fares fluctuated due to several factors, including demand, how close the date of booking is to the travel date, competitive ­activity, seasonality, operating costs and third-party costs such as airport pricing and taxes.


MTF...P2  Cool
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THE GREAT AIRFARE CON JOB

My experience as a businessman in the aviation sector over the past 6 to 12 months are as follows;

Airfares are higher at the destinations serviced by just one carrier - that’s gouging.

Airfares are higher to regional communities that are predominately mining communities/towns - that’s gouging.

The three major regional airlines - Alliance, VA and The Rat are playing a game of ruthless hardball with airports over fees and charges. The past 2 years have been brutal, particularly Qantas with its own ‘written rule’ about airports needing to provide them with 90 days written notice regarding fees and charges increases each year. So what they do is that they know that Councils don’t adopt budgets until early June each year, and only then can the new charges be sent out. So that means the new rates (if Qantas accept them) don’t start getting paid until around September each year. And even then Qantas will say ‘just because you sent us the new rates doesn’t mean we will pay them’. They are demanding an intimate breakdown of airports finances and fee setting mechanisms and methodologies, yet they refuse to provide the same sort of airline data to the airports. The ACCC are too stupid to even be aware of this rort and are certainly to gutless to chase down the airlines - now that is a gouge.
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In reply to Ironsider's Oz article (above):

Via the PAIN email chain:


[Image: getimage.aspx?regionKey=b73uQnf8S6OYHwUP...&scale=100]When regional fares cost the earth … and more

The Australian

Quote:Sandy - Robyn Ironside’s article has a photo of Emma Hartman of Mt. Isa whose husband was killed in a car accident on a long long drive to a coastal destination because they couldn’t afford to fly.

One day I would hope that Australians will wake up to the fact that that the freedom part of free enterprise is the only efficient and cost effective way of providing services, and indeed our prosperous way of life. Air services are no different. 

Where government controls like CASA’s massive over-regulation and fee gouging of General Aviation (GA) impedes our freedoms then watch as the costs zoom up. When technologies are making flying safer than ever CASA is imposing ever more complex and unworkable rules causing great and continuing compliance costs. These costs are compounded also for smaller regional carriers and combined with lack of airport freehold all add to the expenses of flying. Governments of both stripes have slowly forced the closure of hundreds of small flying schools all over Australia. Aircraft refueling facilities have been decommissioned, and with no training the bedrock of aviation has virtually collapsed. 

The thirty year experiment of the bloated, 800 strong, independent Commonwealth corporate regulator, left to its own devices is at the heart of the loss of aviation services in regional and rural areas in Australia. 

If Parliament continues sits on its hands in denial, like our do nothing present aviation Minister Michael MacCormack, then the situation will continue to worsen. Alex in the Rises.



&.. from Mike Smith:

Meanwhile, here in the USA. https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2018/july/26/senate-bill-supports-aviation-careers?utm_source=eBrief&utm_medium=email

Quote:SENATE BILL SUPPORTS AVIATION CAREERS

July 26, 2018 By Amelia Walsh

It’s no secret that the booming aviation industry is here to stay, according to aerospace giant Boeing, which called the demand for pilots “unprecedented” in its jobs forecast released July 23 at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Despite countless opportunities, not enough young people are getting involved in the industry. Key members of the Senate hope their new bipartisan legislation, the Securing and Revitalizing Aviation (SARA) Act of 2018, will change that.

[Image: 0122_us_capitol_advocacy_regs_04_16x9.jp...CEE7580DFE]
The Capitol is home to the U.S. Congress and its House and Senate governing bodies, two of the many government agencies that have influence over general aviation. Photo by David Tulis.

Introduced July 25 by Sens. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) and Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)—both pilots—the SARA Act works to enhance protections for general aviation pilots and encourage more young people to pursue careers in aviation. The bill was co-sponsored by Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Sen. John Boozman (R-Ark.), and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah).

[Image: ri?ph=3031bd758b4456f88ef71857ffbba1ff27...CYARQoAAAA]
As a member of the Senate General Aviation Caucus and a certificated flight instructor with more than 11,000 flight hours, Inhofe has been a longtime supporter of GA and was one of the leading proponents of third class medical reform, which is now referred to as BasicMed. Now, the senator believes the SARA Act will be key to growing the pilot community.

“This bill will empower the next generation of needed pilots by giving young Americans access to quality aviation curriculum such as ground school—a critical first step for most careers in aviation. It further embraces needed reforms to address the substantial delays recreational and commercial pilots face in scheduling check rides, impacting their ability to obtain and maintain necessary qualifications.”

Boeing’s jobs forecast showed that through 2037, there is a need for 635,000 pilots, 622,000 commercial technicians, and 858,000 cabin crew members for a total of 2.12 million jobs.

But the trajectory to becoming a commercial pilot often starts with the basics—and that means ground school. The SARA Act supports the education of pilots by authorizing grants to support the pilot workforce and for supporting entities creating high school aviation curriculum.

The SARA Act doesn’t just benefit student pilots. The bill also enhances protections for GA pilots by authorizing the National Transportation Safety Board to review the FAA’s denial of an airman medical certificate and let an airman reapply without unnecessary wait times.

For pilots flying with charitable organizations like Angel Flight and Pilots N Paws, the SARA Act would qualify volunteers for limited liability protection as long as they follow appropriate procedures, have the FAA-required flight experience, and maintain some amount of liability insurance.

As it stands today, many pilots face wait times up to four to six months to schedule a checkride or other skills testing. The SARA Act takes steps to reform designated pilot examiner (DPE) regulations. The bill would allow for more daily checkrides and remove arbitrary geographic boundaries. Ultimately, it would maintain the appropriate number of DPEs to accommodate the needs of the aviation community.

“Senator Inhofe is a steadfast proponent of general aviation, and we thank him for introducing the SARA Act,” said AOPA President Mark Baker. “This legislation will help rebuild the pilot workforce by introducing more young people to aviation curriculum in high school classrooms, provide pilots who volunteer their time and resources with reasonable good Samaritan protections, help address issues the pilot community is facing with a depleted designated pilot examiner workforce, address good environmental stewardship for seaplane pilots to help stop the spread of aquatic invasive species in our nation’s lakes and rivers, and other positive provisions that will move general aviation forward. AOPA and hundreds of thousands of pilots across America support the SARA Act and urge the Senate to include this bill in the pending FAA Reauthorization.”

Duckworth believes the SARA Act is a commonsense way to address many critical challenges facing the aviation industry. “I’m proud to join Senator Inhofe in introducing this bipartisan legislation that directly targets these problems by expanding educational opportunities for students pursuing careers in aviation, protecting volunteer pilots, and implementing safeguards that benefit the entire aviation community.”

Pilots attending this year’s EAA AirVenture can hear more about the SARA Act and issues facing the industry at Inhofe’s Congressional Forum on Saturday, July 28, at 10 a.m. in Forum Building 6.

Mike


MTF...P2  Cool
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Mount Gambier Hansard now out Rolleyes

Link - HERE - for the Hansard from the Mount Gambier air routes public hearing.

Extracts from the John Sharp & REX session:

Quote:CHAIR: Let me throw this at you:Senator O'Sullivan and I talked about this in the Senate chamber in February when we first came back. We said, 'We're reading the challenges'—we know the challenges: the GA, RPT and all that—'and we're hearing that there's a shortage of pilots.' As an advanced nation, this shouldn't be happening. We should have our eye on the ball; we don't want it to get to that. We asked our diligent secretary to write to the parliamentary lobby. Mr Sharp, you would understand the role of the Parliamentary Library for us in our work. That's a good start to see how things go. Under Dr Thomson's hand, a letter was written to the Parliamentary Library on 21 March 2018 with a question relating to a possible pilot shortage in Australia. 'As confirmed in our subsequent discussion, you have asked for a briefing on the current or potential shortage of pilots in Australia and internationally.' The Parliamentary Library, who I have the greatest respect for, wrote back to us on 28 March and said: 'Short answer: claims about pilot shortages have been made widely for the last 10 to 15 years.'—yes, we've heard that—'There is no evidence that a shortage currently exists in Australia or overseas.' Maybe we need to go back to the Parliamentary Library and say, 'Maybe you need to look in the breeding grounds for the bigger airlines to see'—

Mr Sharp : There is no shortage of people who want to be pilots. When we advertise for applications for the cadet program—I think in the first year we did it we had something like 8,000 applications for, in effect, a capacity of about 40 cadets that we could actually train during the next twelve months. There's no lack of people who want to be pilots; there's a lack of an ability to train them. Part of the reason why is that it's a food chain. The big airlines steal from us. We then go to the flying schools and take an instructor, and that means the flying school doesn't have an instructor and so there aren't people coming through the system from below. Like all food chains, you've got to manage it from top to bottom. In our case, there simply isn't a flow through of people. You're quite right: not all pilots, but a lot of pilots want to fly bigger planes and earn larger amounts of money. A number of pilots are happy working for Rex and living in a country town. In many ways, working for a regional airline's easier than being involved in a large domestic or commercial airline. There's a better lifestyle in a regional airline than there is in those bigger airlines for the pilots and the cabin crew.

We recognise that there are lots of people who want to, but it's very hard to actually train them and have the facilities for it. We've got 22 glass-cockpit aircraft in Wagga. We've got a number of instructors there. We have accommodation for 94 people. The airfield has a capacity to handle a certain amount of traffic. Finding instructors these days is a very difficult task. Qantas have announced they're going to create their own cadet program. That's very good. They've said they want to train 500 cadets a year. They'll never do it. They'll be lucky to train 100 cadets a year, because there aren't enough people down the chain, like instructors, to actually train 100 people. It's that difficult. So it's going to be quite some time before we can build up again to have sufficient people in the whole of the food chain to meet our needs.

There is no question we're not making this pilot shortage up. It's a real thing for us. It causes us as airline managers an enormous amount of headache. Every day a juggling act goes on, trying to work out how many flights we can actually operate with the crews that we have available. Our cancellation rate has trebled in the last year or so, from normally around 0.5 or 0.6 to, as I mentioned earlier, 1.7 in the case of Mount Gambier. But that's pretty much a consistent cancellation figure across the board now, and other airlines have the same problem. Qantas has the same problem. Virgin has the same problem.

Some airlines, particularly Chinese airlines, are paying extremely high salaries for experienced captains. You hear figures of US$750,000 to US$1 million tax free. No airline in Australia could compete at those sorts of prices. We operate 34-seat aircraft. We've only got 34 passengers to pay for the cost of the pilot. If you're operating a 430-seat aircraft, you've got 430 passengers to pay for the cost of the pilot and the other crew members. The bigger the plane, the more you can afford to pay pilots. So we can't really afford to pay our pilots more than we do now. We would argue that once you become a captain you're pretty well paid. It's not a bad-paying job, and it has prospects for further improvement as you go up the seniority ladder and you take on more responsibilities.



CHAIR: Let me ask you this from your previous role. Seriously, it's an issue that we should be looking at. We should be mature enough to say as a nation that we never want to get to a situation where we have to rely on foreign pilots, for a number of reasons. I'd be the first to say that I'm not a lover of 457s, but I understand that, where there are potholes, they need to be filled, but I don't sympathise with anyone when we've seen them coming for years and years but no-one made the investment to train our own people. I'm on the record many times saying that. Surely, there's got to be some political leadership in this nation. I'm not being a smartie here. You're a previous minister. Do we think that the airlines, with the greatest respect, are going to drive this? As though Qantas and Virgin are going to sit there and voluntarily say, 'How can we help you train more people?' There's CASA. Don't start us on CASA! But, anyway, there's CASA. Surely, political leadership should say something along the lines of: 'Get your act together or bang your heads together and I'll do it.'

Mr Sharp : I agree. We've been singing this song for some time and we've been saying it for a lot longer. We've never really stopped talking about it since it first hit us, including the need to establish cadet programs. All of the airlines should have their own content programs and should have their own academy. We'd be very happy to train them and pass them on to those airlines. We see this as an important issue for the future viability of our industry. Both Boeing and Airbus and other institutions have been forecasting the growth of airline business, which translates to aircraft sales, which translates to more pilots. They've been saying this for years. The writing has been on the wall. I have to say, though, that at times airlines have had to offload pilots. Qantas, for example, some years ago offloaded some pilots—let them go—because there were too many. So we've had inevitable ups and downs occur. I think it's an issue that has to be addressed. We need to have a formalised understanding that pilot training is an important part of our economy and that governments should be engaging with industry to ensure that we can cater for our needs in the future, because passenger numbers grow, flight numbers grow, and all the evidence is there that it's going to continue for a long time to come.

CHAIR: For a greater audience than this, I'm one of those. I won't speak for my colleagues. Deregulation, to me, is not always the simple answer. We hear that one person's red tape is another one's minimum standard, and all sorts of stuff like that. For something as important as this, for crying out loud, there needs to be political leadership. I'm not saying the government needs to do it, but there are plenty of things that we could do with taxation and all sorts of stuff like that, if we were fair dinkum and were listening to the aviation industry. 'It's not our problem. It's distance.' 'It's Qantas's problem.' 'It's Virgin's problem.' 'It's your problem.' Like you said, pay the pilots more, but, at the same time, reduce. I understand that. I just want to get your thoughts as the deputy chairman now, not as a previous minister. If you were at the table, I'd be throwing it at you when we got back to Canberra.

Mr Sharp : We have, in recent times, for the first time in the history of the aviation industry, formed a group called Airlines for Australia and New Zealand. In the past, the individual airlines in Australia looked after their own affairs. We always look to Qantas and say, 'They're big enough and tough enough to look after themselves,' and they probably look to us and say the same thing. In the last year or so, we agreed to form this group. Our purpose is to carry to government a combined united voice on industry affairs.

The leading issue for us is airport monopolies and their behaviour. Another issue which we've also been dealing with government on is the pilot shortage. It's probably our No. 2 issue—maybe No. 1. But we're trying to now get a united voice to take to government. The airlines that are part of it are Rex, Virgin, Qantas and Air New Zealand as the founding members of this organisation. In this way, we hope that government will take more notice of us and we can talk about these problems.


CHAIR: Is it not the case, Mr Sharp, that we're frightening the living daylights out of the training providers now, with the increased regulation demanded by CASA?

Mr Sharp : CASA generally frightens everybody in the industry on a daily basis! Yes, there have been a lot of problems. One of the issues that you may be aware of is indemnity for flying instructors because, when they certify a pilot, they technically carry a liability attached to that pilot that they certified for the rest of that pilot's working life. To cover that risk, that liability, you need some form of either indemnity or insurance. Even if you retire from flying instruction, you still carry the liability, so it's very difficult for people. If you no longer earn an income from flying instructing but carry a liability, how do you cover the cost of the insurance for that? It's very difficult.

CHAIR: Maybe we should do that with the crooks that have been doing the heavy-vehicle driver instructor training and assessing in Queensland, Victoria and WA.

Mr Sharp : It could be. But it is an issue that the government is cognisant of, and I think the minister made a statement at a meeting in Wagga just recently, with GA operators, announcing some indemnity there for instructors. So that's a help. But these are the things that occur. The government should be helping, and yet, by removing the indemnities and making instructors personally liable for any damage, all that does is make being an instructor a very unattractive business.


MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
DEPARTMENT OF MUSHROOMS AND INCOMPETENT TROUGH SWILLERS

Thanks P2, you sure know how to poke the Gobbledock bear. And here is the moneyshot;

“The Parliamentary Library, who I have the greatest respect for, wrote back to us on 28 March and said: 'Short answer: claims about pilot shortages have been made widely for the last 10 to 15 years.'—yes, we've heard that—'There is no evidence that a shortage currently exists in Australia or overseas.”

And there you have it. These overpaid, under qualified, obsfucating carbuncles have absolutely no idea. This is the greatest admission of a disconnection from reality you will see. A bunch of archaic overpaid bureaucratic pen pushers sitting in plush offices and listening to only the words CAsA and the Murky Mandarins spin.

Dear Fu#kwits,

Get away from your mahogany desks and take a stroll in the real world. I know I know, it may be a little bit scary, but if you travel in groups you will be safe.

Tick Tock

P7 - "Choc Frog GD."
Reply
Budget Estimates QON: Overdue miniscule 4G AQON?? 

Amazingly after making this post on miniscule 4G's popular thread - Point of difference: A captured Minister vs a Minister in charge? - the Dept AQON started rolling in - see HERE. -  Rolleyes 

So from an aviation safety agency (i.e the 'Three Stooges') perspective here is where we are at; via @AuSenate Wink :

ATSB QON:

182
Barry O'Sullivan
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Identification of drones
Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Answered
22/05/2018


Senate Estimates -  ATSB MH370 related AQON: 


Quote:Overdue No
Asked Of Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Proof Hansard Page/Written 58
Portfolio Question Number 246
Question

Mr Hood: There was also a program management board that oversaw the expenditure of the funds, and we had the processes and funds audited by KPMG. In terms of all the audit reports and the moneys in and out, that's certainly available if you'd like that. 
Senator PATRICK: Maybe it's worth tabling the KPMG report. 
Mr Hood: I'll take that on notice to provide that.

Answer
The ATSB’s financial statements are audited annually by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). For the financial years 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 the ANAO gave the MH370 program particular attention. The audit closing letters for each of these financial years is at Attachment A. In the 2016–17 closing letter ANAO specifically references MH370 advising:

We have concluded that ATSB’s revenues and expenses incurred for the search of flight MH370 are materially stated and have been disclosed appropriately in the financial statements.

KPMG, the ATSB’s internal auditor, also completed a ‘Health Check’ of the MH370 program in early 2016. This report is at Attachment B. The report acknowledged the governance structures in place including a Program Board with a representative from the Department of Finance. The report included some business improvement recommendations which were addressed.

Attachments

 Attachment A – ANAO Financial Audit Closing Letters

 Attachment B – MH370 Health-Check Report, KPMG, February 2016
Download question with answer 

Answer Attachment 
183 Attachment.pdf

Answered Date 
06/08/2018


Overdue No
Asked Of Australian Transport Safety Bureau
Proof Hansard Page/Written Written
Portfolio Question Number 366
Question

1. The ATSB has repeatedly said the satellite data shows MH370 was in a rapid and increasing rate of descent at the end. Larry Vance points out that in such cases, such as Swissair 111, the aircraft gets pulverised into two million smallish parts. How does the ATSB explain the fact that the flaperon and the flap were largely intact; there was nothing big or intact enough to be even recognisable as a flap or flaperon on Swissair 111?
2. Does the ATSB think the flap and flaperon fell off due to "flutter" in a high speed dive?

  1. If so, why was there no flutter damage to the leading edges?

4. Captain John Cox, a leading air crash investigator, says this of the satellite data when it comes to the speed of descent:The ATSB takes BFO data and derives a vertical profile between the 6th and 7th arc. This is very high (almost too high) indicating a extremely steep descent. However the 7th exchange is a "Power Up" exchange and the vertical information is not as accurate. Looking at the 1st Arc exchange, which was also a "Power Up" exchange the vertical date was determined to be spurious or so inaccurate it was not considered valid. If during a "Power Up" exchange the vertical data is less accurate then the 7th Arc exchange must be viewed with the same concern. Therefore, the vertical BFO derived data is less credible than other data points. This would support Larry's theory and weaken the ATSB position.
    1. Is Captain Cox wrong, and if so, why?
Answer
1. The ATSB has never performed analysis nor published any information in relation to the speed that the aircraft may have impacted the ocean surface. The analysis performed by scientists from the Defence Science Technology Group (DST Group) of the metadata associated with the final two satellite communications between the aircraft and the Inmarsat ground station concluded that the aircraft was in a high and increasing rate of descent over the eight second time period between the two transmissions.

The analysis by the ATSB and other members of the MH370 Search Strategy Working Group, which includes Inmarsat, Thales, Boeing the Air Accidents Investigation Branch of UK and National Transportation Safety Board of the USA, concluded it is most likely these final two transmissions were triggered by fuel exhaustion of the engines and a restart of the aircraft’s auxiliary power unit and would have occurred when the aircraft was still at an altitude of between 20,000 and 30,000 ft.

Boeing simulations (documented in MH370 – Search and debris examination update available at: http://www.atsb.gov.au/media/5771773/ae-2014-054_debris-update_2nov2016.pdf) of the aircraft’s unpiloted glide behaviour after fuel exhaustion indicated that it is likely that the aircraft performed a series of phugoid motions, with periods of descent at differing rates and periods where the aircraft also gained altitude in the final minutes of the flight. Given the uncertainties associated with the final minutes of the flight it is not possible to conclude a speed at which it is likely the aircraft impacted the ocean surface.

The ATSB has studied many accidents where aircraft have impacted water. The damage to the aircraft and debris resulting from the impact is dependent on many factors including the aircraft’s speed both horizontal and vertical, the attitude of the aircraft at the point of impact and the type, size and construction of the aircraft. Some accidents where there was a high rate of descent led to aircraft debris which was in large sections, including Air France flight 447 which crashed off the coast of Brazil in 2009.

2. The ATSB has never published any analysis suggesting that the flap or flaperon separated from the aircraft due to aerodynamic flutter.

3. The analysis to which Captain Cox refers in this quote was performed by scientists from DST Group and is referred to in the answer to Question 1. A summary of this analysis was included in the ATSB report MH370 – Search and debris examination update (2 November 2016) (http://www.atsb.gov.au/media/5771773/ae-2014-054_debris-update_2nov2016.pdf). A more detailed analysis was published by the DST Group in MH370 Burst Frequency Offset Analysis and Implications on Decent Rate at End-of-Flight (15 January 2018) (Attachment A). The summary in the ATSB report explains that the DST Group analysis accounts for all possible errors in the satellite communication metadata due to system oscillator “warm up” transients and all possible speeds and headings of the aircraft.

The ATSB made contact with Captain Cox at the time his original assessment (quoted in the question) of DST Group’s descent analysis was used in an article in the Australian newspaper and provided him with a copy of DST Group’s full published analysis. He subsequently agreed that his original assessment, used in the newspaper article, was incorrect and the ATSB understands that Captain Cox has asked the Australian newspaper to print a correction.

Attachments

 Attachment A – MH370 Burst Frequency Offset Analysis and Implications on Decent Rate at End-of-Flight, 15 January 2018

Download question with answer 

Answer Attachment 


184 Attachment.pdf

Answered Date 
06/08/2018

Airservices AQON so far:

Quote:
185
Richard Colbeck
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Reactivation of VOR
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018

186
Rex Patrick
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Airservices charges
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018




Overdue No
Asked Of Airservices Australia
Proof Hansard Page/Written 71
Portfolio Question Number 249
Question
Mr Harfield: No. We did this morning on questions that we could have got today referencing the safety incidents from the article of 19 May. 
Senator McKIM: By the way, do you intend to provide this to the community as part of the consultation? 
Mr Harfield: Probably not this particular chart, but a chart that would depend on what we're actually trying to consult with the community on. 
Senator McKIM: I've just sent it down to my office, so it's fair to say they're going to have a look at it very soon if they haven't already. I just want to ask about safety first. We all want to see safe airports; I'm sure we can all agree on that. Can you just confirm, firstly, there were no loss of separation incidents at Hobart airport in the nine years prior to the changes? 
Mr Harfield: No, I can't confirm that. I would say that there were; however, I'll have to take that on notice. 
Senator McKIM: Could you provide that on notice to the committee, please. 
Mr Harfield: Absolutely....
Senator McKIM: Thanks for that. How does that compare to perhaps a similar period of time prior to the changes? 
Mr Harfield: Prior to the changes, we did a comparison. We had a look at the same period of time but 12 months prior. There were not the two loss of separation events or a loss of separation assurance event during that time but, as I was saying to Senator Colbeck, we did see a reduction in the number of go-arounds. 
Senator McKIM: Post the implementation of the change? 
Mr Harfield: Post the implementation. In the incidents we saw beforehand, we saw more go-arounds than we did in this period after the implementation. 
Senator McKIM: Do you have the figures for that? 
Mr Harfield: Off the top of my head, it was 27 prior and 22 after; it was a difference of five. 
Senator McKIM: So a reduction of five for the same period in the previous year? 
Mr Harfield: Correct.
Senator McKIM: Do you have the data for the same period in the previous years? 
Mr Harfield: We can do that. I don't have it off the top of my head, but we can provide that. 
Senator McKIM: Maybe going back five years, if that's data that you keep. It's your assertion that the changes have made the Hobart airport safer-is that right? 
Mr Harfield: They improved the safety of flying in and out of Hobart airport, yes.+ Expand Question

Answer

Loss of Separation

Three loss of separation occurrences were reported in the vicinity of Hobart over the nine years prior to Standard Instrument Departure (SID) and Standard Terminal Arrival Route (STAR) implementation.

Go-arounds

Post SID/STAR implementation:

14/09/2017 to 6/06/2018 – 21 occurrences.

Pre SID/STAR implementation:

14/09/2016 to 6/06/2017 – 26 occurrences

14/09/2015 to 6/06/2016 – 28 occurrences.

14/09/2014 to 6/06/2015 – 45 occurrences.

14/09/2013 to 6/06/2014 – 15 occurrences.

Download question with answer 

Answered Date 
06/08/2018

188
Nick McKim
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Internal review of the new flight paths
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018



Overdue No
Asked Of Airservices Australia
Proof Hansard Page/Written 73
Portfolio Question Number 252
Question
Senator McKIM: Is it your contention that air traffic control staff at Hobart were also thoroughly consulted about the change? 
Mr Harfield: The air traffic control staff would have been consulted in our normal change process that we do for any procedures or air route changes within the operation. 
Senator McKIM: All of them? Does that include all air traffic controllers or a part? 
Mr Harfield: Technically, they wouldn't be operating under their licence if they weren't deemed to be competent or understand the changes that they shouldn't be- 
Senator McKIM: No, I'm asking about the consultation. 
Mr Harfield: There's a normal change process that we have in the operations. That would have been carried out. 
Senator McKIM: I'm asking: did that normal change process involve consulting all air traffic control staff at Hobart about the change? 
Mr Harfield: It would depend on your definition of 'consultation'. I'm not trying to be-
CHAIR: Mr Harfield, it's a pretty simple question. You've got X number of air traffic controllers; you've got a change coming down the pike; you have processes of consultation. The senator's question is quite clear. 
Mr Harfield: No, no. The thing is that they would be made aware of the change, and they would have- 
CHAIR: That's not consultation. The burden of his question is consultation. 
Mr Harfield: So they would have been made aware through our normal operational change processes, and they would have had the ability to object to the change or raise any issues that they had with the change, which is our normal process- 
Senator McKIM: After the change had been made?
Mr Harfield: No, Senator. Our requirements are that we do a safety assessment and people have the ability to raise issues associated with that safety assessment, and that's our normal operational change process. 
Senator McKIM: That includes all air traffic controllers in Hobart? 
Mr Harfield: There is an ability for all controllers-the reason I'm saying that is that I can't say that all controllers were applied, but it's available to them. I'd have to take it on notice to find what the process actually was....
Mr Harfield: The normal process is that somebody from Hobart would have been involved in that. 
CHAIR: There we go. 
Senator McKIM: I understand that to be true, but 'somebody' is obviously nowhere near all of the control staff at Hobart. Perhaps I could just ask you to take on notice how many of the air traffic control staff at Hobart were consulted and the nature of that consultation. Can you take that on notice? 
Mr Harfield: Yes.+ Expand Question

Answer All eight Hobart Tower controllers had an opportunity to provide input to the change. They were initially advised in July 2016 of the implementation of Hobart SID/STARs to take effect in September 2017. Regular updates were provided on the progress of the SID/STAR design, a feedback process was established and input was encouraged and captured.
Download question with answer 

Answered Date 
06/08/2018

190
Nick McKim
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Alternative suggestions at Hobart Airport
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018

191
Chris Ketter
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Passenger threshold at Whitsunday Coast Airport
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018

192
Chris Ketter
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Number of arffs fire stations built in the last five to 10 years
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018

193
Jonathon Duniam
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Environmental assessment decision-making process
Airservices Australia
Answered
22/05/2018

194
Jonathon Duniam
Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities

From there on (through to CASA) the QON are still yet to be answered but I have been assured from the RRAT Committee Secretariat that the answers will be published over the next couple of days -  Wink


MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
Budget Estimates - CASA AQON.

Via the RRAT Estimates webpage: 
Quote:Asked Of Civil Aviation Safety Authority
Proof Hansard Page/Written 80
Portfolio Question Number 236
Question
Senator PATRICK: So these photographs are of the state of a tyre for a Qantas aircraft that landed in Brisbane. It was transiting through Townsville, this was in 2016, and the log of events shows that, due to insufficient manpower available to carry out the wheel change, the aircraft was sent on: 'The tyre may continue in service without safety concerns but must be replaced at the next check.' The bottom line is that there were not enough engineers on the ground to change the tyre, so they sent the aircraft on to the next location-possibly under commercial pressure; I don't understand the reasons why. But you would I'm sure appreciate, Mr Carmody, the seriousness of having an aircraft take off with a tyre in that state, noting in extremis the Concorde, when it took off from Paris, shed a tyre which went through the fuel tanks, with a tragedy at the end of that. So I suspect you would be concerned about an aircraft that might take off with a tyre like that? 
Mr Carmody: I'm aware of the matter because it was 18 months ago. It's been referred to us. It's been referred to the Industry Complaints Commissioner, and the Industry Complaints Commissioner has reviewed the matter. So it's gone through our internal processes. I will make a couple of points: I saw the document, which hasn't been tabled but which you read out, that the tyre was released. So an engineer certified that the tyre was okay. I don't know, therefore, what damage occurred on subsequent landing. I assume that's not take-off damage; that's landing damage. An engineer certified it was suitable for take-off. 
Senator PATRICK: I've talked to a number of engineers who have suggested that that sort of damage to a tyre couldn't happen on a single landing; you might get an isolated location; the point of the two photographs is they show that it's all around the tyre. But, in general, would that not concern you at all? 
Mr Carmody: I was concerned, but, as I said, the matter was raised, it went to the independent Industry Complaints Commissioner and it was reviewed. So, as far as I'm concerned, any matters have been resolved. 
Senator PATRICK: That's noted. 
Mr Carmody: There is a completely independent mechanism; it's independent of me. 
CHAIR: I appreciate that. I often have a plumber come to my house and the tap is still leaking afterwards. If that's the case, then I'd be concerned about the independence or the attention paid by an independent-
Senator PATRICK: Can I just stop, because I think there is a step in the middle that you are missing. That is that this gets investigated by CASA, and in this instance it was. There were concerns over the investigation and it then went on to the complaints commissioner. The role of the complaints commissioner is not to conduct an investigation. The complaint was that CASA had not conducted its job properly. 
Mr Carmody: So it was investigated by CASA and it was then peer reviewed by another office, so a different part of the organisation, to see whether the investigation was well founded, which we do quite often in contentious cases. We put inspectors from a different location on to review the matter so that we have a different set of eyes-an independent set of eyes. That was done in the process. Then it went to the industry complaints commissioner.
CHAIR: We could spar around all day here-I hope I don't mow your lawn, Senator-I'd like you to take on notice to supply the committee with the entire file, cover to cover: any artefacts; any photographs; any interviews, whether audio or otherwise; any files that are held, IT, however it does. You know the drill. From A to Z, supply it to the committee so that we can have a look at this. 
Mr Carmody: Certainly, Senator....
Senator Scullion: Can I just get a point of clarification. For the interests of completeness, the body is slightly independent from you. So the material of the committee you are going to provide includes their deliberations as well? 
CHAIR: Absolutely. 
Senator Scullion: Just for clarification. 
CHAIR: Thank you for that, Minister-A to Z.- Collapse Question

Answer 
The information requested has been provided to the Committee under a covering letter from the CASA Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety of 8 June 2018.


Asked Of Civil Aviation Safety Authority
Proof Hansard Page/Written 81
Portfolio Question Number 307
Question
Senator PATRICK: I'll mention another incident as well that you are probably aware of, a TCAS incident on a Qantas flight. The aircraft arrived into Sydney on 19 November 2016. The tech crew reported that, 'TCAS: some targets displayed in wrong position last three sectors-that is, aircraft landing in Melbourne appeared 90 degrees out on final.' Are you familiar with or have you heard-
Mr Carmody: I'll have to take that on notice. I haven't got the documentation in front of me.

Answer As indicated in Committee Question number 209 the information requested has been provided to the Committee under a covering letter from the CASA Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety of 8 June 2018.
Download question with answer 

Answered Date 
07/08/2018



Asked Of Civil Aviation Safety Authority
Proof Hansard Page/Written 84
Portfolio Question Number 237
Question
Senator PATRICK: There's a detailed set of concerns that the federation has laid out as to what did not occur in the investigation of the tyre matter and in the TCAS matter, and hence the relation to what I've tendered to the committee. I don't know where we go from here, Chair. I'm disturbed by that and maybe they need some time to look at it and respond. Could we also get the TCAS file? 
CHAIR: I'm satisfied that Mr Carmody and his team will mull over this for a little bit, and we'd look forward to a further conversation soon and not after waiting for next estimates. When you think you've satisfactorily had a look and talked to the commissioner, you might contact Dr Thompson and we can just have a meeting for 15 minutes- 
Mr Carmody: Chair, that would be fine. I'd also be happy to provide you with a specific written response on the issues that you've raised surrounding this so you would have something formal, if that would suit the committee as well? 
CHAIR: Yes, I think that's suitable for the committee.

Answer 
The information requested has been provided to the Committee under a covering letter from the CASA Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety of 8 June 2018.

Download question with answer 

Answered Date 
07/08/2018



Asked Of Civil Aviation Safety Authority
Proof Hansard Page/Written 84
Portfolio Question Number 238
Question
Senator KETTER: I have a follow-up question. The issue that gave rise to the problem is the manpower shortage at Townsville Airport, as I understand it. Was that investigated as part of CASA's processes, and what was the result of that? Has that been rectified? 
Mr Crawford: That would ultimately be a matter for the SMS at Qantas. Their safety management system should follow-up on that. What we do is we review the effectiveness of their SMS. 
Senator KETTER: Sorry, I can't hear you, Mr Crawford. 
Mr Crawford: That should have been followed up with the operator's safety management system. What we do is we do surveillance on the operator; we look at the effectiveness of their safety management system. 
Senator KETTER: Is the answer to my question that- 
Mr Crawford: The issue is that, at the end of the day, we cannot determine from the photograph taken at the other airport whether that tyre was serviceable or not. We can't by looking at that photograph. But the maintenance engineer says that the tyre was safe to go, so he is saying it was serviceable. That's what we have to work with.
Senator KETTER: That's not the issue I'm raising. I'm talking about the assertion in that log that there were manpower shortages which gave rise to the fact that the tyre couldn't be changed. 
Mr Crawford: We'll take that on notice.+ Expand Question

Answer
The information requested has been provided to the Committee under a covering letter from the CASA Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety of 8 June 2018.

Download question with answer 

Answered Date 
07/08/2018

At this point in time it would appear that the Carmody 'covering letter' referred to in QON 207 to 209 is still yet to be tabled.


MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
KISS, (Liverpool type) it's the only way.

Just spent a half hour going back over the many posts relating to public safety around aerodromes. There is a lot, a serious lot of good information there, all of which has been totally ignored by our politicians. Perhaps we have been too ‘technical’ or too academic; or, is it just too difficult a subject for politicians to grasp. Perhaps we weren’t clear enough. Or perhaps the politicians are just too ducking dumb to read joined up writing; or too bloody lazy; or, just too happy to be led about by the foreskin by their ‘expert’ advice; maybe, just maybe, they are completely deceived by clever manipulation of ‘wording’. Below is a classic example:-

Senator PATRICK: Are you looking at public safety zones around Sydney Airport?

Mr McRandle: We're looking at public safety zones generally across Australian airports as part of the National Airports Safeguarding Framework. A consultation process commenced a little over a week ago with the community around public safety zones. It will include all airports. Queensland has already incorporated the public safety zone approach to their airports. There are others around Australia that haven't adopted it.

Then this:-

In March 2018 the Transport and Infrastructure Senior Officials' Committee (TISOC) agreed to the National Airports Safeguarding Advisory Group (NASAG) publicly consulting on the draft new National Airport Safeguarding Framework (NASF) GuidelineManaging the Risk in Public Safety Zones at the Ends of Runways.

FDS – The buildings at Essendon, those that were slammed into by a 5.7 ton aircraft, carrying a ton of fuel – (remember the fire ball) infringed the  SIDE of the runway ‘safety zones’. Not the approach and departure safety zones. You must not confuse the two. The Senators asking questions are being merrily led down a very smooth path to deception.

I’ll make it crystal clear – through manipulation and sleight of legal hand, there are building which impinge on the ‘SIDE OF RUNWAY’ safety zones. The places where shopping outlets and passenger terminal buildings are located. There are minimum runway WIDTH parameters specified - for bloody good reasons – Essendon providing the quintessential example of why. What’s next FDS – coffee and fast food outlets along the taxi-ways?.

FDS Senators – get your act together before there is mass carnage; look at Archerfield – then watch again as the aircraft which landed in a Moorabin street busts into flames. Watch the Essendon fire ball again.   You got to ask yourself – are you feeling lucky Punk?



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