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CASA meets the Press
A diplomatic Hitch.

Hitch – “That was evident again this week when CASA issued the new CAAP 166-1 covering ops at non-controlled airfields. The CAAP ignored the fact that a discussion paper was still active over the issue of the most appropriate frequency, making it seem that CASA had decided the matter in its own favour already.”

Transition blues and ‘skills’ issues aside; there must be a ‘system’ for the issuing of CAAP and it is hardly a ‘new’ process. I find it hard to believe that some skill challenged ‘newbe’ sat down one morning and drafted the CAAP then published it; it is a risible notion. What I can believe is that someone goofed and published the thing before the ‘after consultation with industry’ blurb had been released. Cart before horse job; and CASA is embarrassed because the hard truth has been released before softening up spin. No one in CASA gives a rats arse what industry think or want; they’re just pissed off the ‘ruling’ was delivered prematurely. Consultation with CASA is a one way street to their highway, use is encouraged as it controls traffic, buys them time and provides great top cover. Watch the ‘medical’ consultation – carefully, don’t blink or you will miss a great opportunity to see the ‘process’ in action.

Senator – “There are numerous complaints from industry regarding the new rules relating to pre departure pee-ing behind the hanger doors.”

CASA – “No Senator, this is just the whining of a few miscreants, we consulted widely with industry, accepted and considered many submissions on the subject and; in consultation with our industry stakeholders, put the new rules out for industry consideration”. There was only positive ‘feedback’ and the rule was rubber stamped by parliament”.

Senator – “Oh, well, that’s great, thank you”.

Reform in CASA is simply seen as an opportunity to find new ways to change nothing and find better ways to cover and preferably avoid those ‘awkward’ questions. As Carmody slides into his now comfy seat, there will be much smoother pineapple delivery, but for all that, pineapple delivery will continue nonetheless. Business as usual in Sleepy Hollow.

Toot toot.
Reply
LMH MIA? - Tassie Examiner to fill the fray... Wink

(04-28-2017, 03:26 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Hitch on zebras & horses etc. - Rolleyes

LMH via the Yaffa's @OzFlying... Wink :
Quote:..Next week's Last Minute Hitch will be frantically tapped-out on a laptop from somewhere at Aviatex, the general aviation expo that precedes Wings Over Illawarra. Aviatex has attracted exhibitors like Cirrus, Sling, QBE, Hawker Pacific, CASA, Tecnam, Bose, OzRunways, AvPlan and Evektor as well as many associations and government bodies. The support this expo has received from the industry and its relative proximity to Sydney could see it becoming one of Australia's most important aviation expos. Aviatex starts on Friday 5 May and runs right throughout the following two days of WOI as well. It seems to me that we're in for a great three days of talking aviation! The full exhibitor list is on the Aviatex website.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...r0pHgzd.99

Earth to Hitch...  Huh

Hitch is still MIA at Aviatex & WOI? However while we wait for this week's LMH I note that (another happy little chappy from Tassie) Hayden Johnson from the Tassie Examiner, has made a good fist of getting his head around the issues threatening to decimate both the local and national GA industry... Confused
Quote:Tasmania's aviation industry 'crippled by regulation'
Hayden Johnson 

6 May 2017, 8 a.m.
Rising costs and stricter regulations has crippled the general aviation industry across the nation.

[Image: r0_299_5752_3535_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg]


[Image: r0_316_6016_3700_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg]

A morning with the Tasmanian Aero Club

About 15 years ago a buzz echoed across the land and Tasmania’s skies were filled with quality aircraft flying high above.

That buzz is a lot quieter in 2017. 

Rising costs and stricter regulations has crippled the general aviation industry across the nation and in Tasmania.

Flight schools have downsized and fewer students are completing general aviation licences.

It is estimated the general aviation industry has declined 35 per cent in the past ten years. 

According to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority’s 2015-2016 annual report, there were 12,571 current private flight crew licences – down from 13,097 on the previous financial year.

The number of licenses issued was also down significantly from 15,014 in the 2004-2005 financial year. 

The downturn in general aviation is in contrast to the rising popularity of recreational aviation.

Less regulated, cheaper and easier to obtain a licence – recreational aviation is now the go-to licence for most student pilots.

Recreational aviation was born as a category of ultra-light, ‘rag and tube’ aircraft – a raw flying experience with limited creature comforts or regulation. 

But in two decades recreational aviation has grown to become a category of hobby pilots, taking to the skies in a range of machines. 

According to CASA figures; in 2015-2016 there were 2951 recreational licences, slightly above the 2821 licences in 2014-2015. 

Recreational Aviation Australia is authorised to self-administer sport and recreational flying activities on behalf of the government's Civil Aviation Safety Authority. 

Because the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 do not regulate recreational aviation, the cost to fly these planes is far cheaper than in general aviation – where planes are built to a higher certification standard.

Although general aviation planes have more than two seats, can usually be flown higher and carry more weight than recreational aviation aircraft, it is more expensive. 

Those in the aviation industry say general aviation has been crippled by CASA’s burdening regulations.

Those regulations include a stipulation that general aviation aircraft must be serviced by a qualified professional – often at a cost of between $1000 and $2000.

And as the cost of fuel, maintenance and flight training rises, many flying schools are no longer training pilots in general aviation.

After about 70 years of operation, the general aviation school at the Launceston Airport was closed two years ago.

Tasmanian Aero Club treasurer and senior RAA instructor Andrew Duddington bluntly recalls the decision to close.

“We gave it up because of everything was going up,” he said. 

New regulations coupled with increased fees saw the school’s profit margin diminish and become unviable.  

“It was losing money so it was best in our part to give it up,” Mr Duddington added.

”It wasn’t busy enough to pay our instructor a full-time wage so it just wasn’t worthwhile continuing.

“General aviation flight training is pretty much near non-existent in Tasmania compared to what it was, say, 10 years ago.”

The Tasmanian Aero Club continues to operate a recreational aviation flying school – which is teaching about one dozen active students.

But without students training in general aviation, the breeding ground for airline pilots, Mr Duddington fears for the future of Australia’s regulated aviation industry.

“The pilots flying with Virgin and Jetstar and Qantas, where are they going to train once it all fizzes up – which it will,” he said.

Mr Duddington pointed to the three major airlines’ Pilot Cadetship Program as evidence that not enough students are training.

He tipped the next generation of Australian airline pilots would come from overseas. 
Despite the general aviation industry teetering on death’s door, Mr Duddington praised the advocates doing their best to reinvigorate the industry.

“I hope it’s successful but the writing's on the wall – it’s very hard to stop,” he added.

One of those people doing their best to ensure general aviation lives on is Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association executive director Ben Morgan.

The head of the peak national body for pilots attributed the death of the aviation industry to the federal government and Minister for Transport Darren Chester.
 
It is estimated about 8000 pilots have left the general aviation industry in the past ten years.

Maintenance facilities have closed and flying schools have downsized.

To combat the issues the general aviation industry faces, Mr Chester established an advisory group to “ensure the industry has a voice at the heart of government by providing advice directly to me on matters affecting the sector”.

The advisory group had its first meeting at the Australian International Airshow at Avalon in March.

But Mr Morgan slammed the group and said the general aviation industry did not need more discussions.

"That consultative group is yet to achieve anything,” he said.

“I would urge the Minister instead to start acting on the reform proposals already given to his office.” 

Mr Morgan said the general aviation industry had lobbied successive governments over the past 20 years to overhaul the Civil Aviation Act to breathe new life into the industry.
 
“If the government was deadly serious about fixing the problem in general aviation it would have pulled the trigger on these reforms,” he said.

Defending against Mr Morgan’s attack, Mr Chester said the government recently announced a “major study to identify priorities for the general aviation sector”.

“The GA Study is due to report by June 30 and it will form an important part of the government's response,” he said.

Mr Chester also touted the General Aviation Advisory Group as a tool to work on fixing the sector.

“The group is acting as a reference group for the GA study, and with its membership drawn from a cross section of the GA sector, I’m expecting the group to make a valuable contribution,” he said. 

But Mr Morgan said the government needed to instruct CASA to “get away from a concept that it’s safety at whatever cost”.

He said by allowing the lower regulated recreational aviation sector to flourish, CASA had created a “less safe aviation system” with pilots getting licences faster and instructors with limited experience teaching students. 

But CASA spokesman Peter Gibson said the organisation understood the issues facing general aviation and had “a commitment to developing regulations that are practical and affordable, while always putting safety first”.

But he said many of the issues GA faced were well beyond CASA’s jurisdiction.

“There are many financial and other issues that influence the health of general aviation in particular areas of Australia,” he said.  

“In some places, general aviation is vibrant, in others not so.  

“As a regulator, we must make safety rules for the whole nation, not one area.”

Mr Gibson said the authority’s challenge was to strike a balance “...between ensuring necessary safety standards are in place while keeping financial and operational burdens reasonable”.  

“The Australian public expects safe skies and everyone in aviation must meet that expectation,” he said. 

“But at the same time, we must be mindful of making rules that are practical and affordable.”  

Mr Morgan echoed Mr Duddington’s concern about the future of Australian airline pilots.
 
“We are facing situation within the next five years of airlines being forced to moving their major pilot hiring operations offshore,” the national executive added.

“It’s going to be devastating for Australian kids.” 

Pinocchio Gobson:“As a regulator, we must make safety rules for the whole nation, not one area.”

Sounds like Gobson is quoting directly from the Boyd board book of 'do nothing' and obfuscation.. Dodgy

Top job HJ, the choccy frog voucher is in the mail... Wink


MTF...P2 Cool
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Choc Frog competition.

But CASA spokesman Peter Gibson said the organisation understood the issues facing general aviation and had “a commitment to developing regulations that are practical and affordable, while always putting safety first”.

But he said many of the issues GA faced were well beyond CASA’s jurisdiction.

“There are many financial and other issues that influence the health of general aviation in particular areas of Australia,” he said.  

“In some places, general aviation is vibrant, in others not so.  

“As a regulator, we must make safety rules for the whole nation, not one area.”

Mr Gibson said the authority’s challenge was to strike a balance “...between ensuring necessary safety standards are in place while keeping financial and operational burdens reasonable”.  

“The Australian public expects safe skies and everyone in aviation must meet that expectation,” he said.

“But at the same time, we must be mindful of making rules that are practical and affordable.”  

Who said this first and for a bonus CF, where and when?
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Poor old Tassie, then again its much the same wherever you go.
Somehow the "club" disappeared to be replaced by business.

As a 6 year old I remember the days at the Aeroclub of Southern Tasmania,
Lloyd Jones was the CFI. My dad an ex Raffi was an honoury instructor on the
weekends. Sunday was family day, there was a kids playground next to the hanger,
families would go out Sundays, a barbecue lunch, lots of flying comps., streamer cutting, spot landings,flour bombing, all good fun, and as a kid you often got invited to go along with someone doing a city sight see, I needed about four cushions to see out of the old tigers. Oh the smell of Dope and canvas and gypsy major engines, no radio just lights from the tower, still got my Dads old leather helmet with the "POOF" tube attached.

This was a primary airport so things got suspended for the DC3 to land from Melbourne, my uncle was a captain based in Hobart, he'd often come down to the "Club" and join the throng in full dress uniform and bring the rest of his crew with him.

There was also monthly fly-a-ways, down to Lake Pedder for a barbie on the beach,Kids dispatched with lengths of string and a lump of meat to catch fresh water lobsters from the creek or up to Launnie for a visit to the club there, or Wynyard or a property strip on the farm, rabbit shooting or picking mushrooms. I learnt how to tickle spotted eels (Trout) out of the creek.

The thing was, it was social, family orientated,where did all that go? The fun and enjoyment, jeez I had my first crush on one of the Hosties from my Uncles crew, I was going to marry her....when I grew up.

Them were the days, pity we lost that along the way.
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Hitch surfaces from WOI - Big Grin

Via Oz Flying today:
Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 8 May 2017
5 May 2017

With Wings over Illawarra taking up much of my cerebral processing power last Friday and Saturday, I made the decision not to bring out a newsletter, but delay it to today instead. It gave me time to sit back, chat to people and enjoy the show. I also pointed my camera around a little bit too; the results are in our Wings over Illawarra gallery on the Australian Flying website.

WOI is starting to gain traction with the public and military as an important event for the region, and the organisers made an attempt this year to forge a greater connection with general aviation with the Aviatex expo. Aviatex ran over three days, including the Friday as well as the Saturday and Sunday of the air show. The Friday was a trade-only day, but may have mis-fired somewhat as the day was not well attended. This was likely a miscalculation, because it forced Aviatex to draw its own crowd without the added attraction of an air show as well. Not even Avalon does that. Exhibitors were much happier with the attendances on the Saturday when the air show was on, so the point is possibly proven.

The AOPA presence at WOI apparently heralds a new level of participation for the association. AOPA has attended many shows over the years, but the one thing that has been missing is serious hosting for members. That has never been a sign of a lack of will, rather a lack of available funds. With the marquee, fenced-off seating area and now the aerobatic team established, AOPA is making itself a large player in aviation events in Australia. Not only is this a great way to wave the flag, but also to increase the value of a membership.

CASA has elected to do away with one of the most reviled ADs that has ever inflicted the general aviation industry. The requirement was to dispose of control cables just because they had been installed over 15 years ago or more. Aviation maintenance is expensive enough as it is without throwing away components that may be still very usable. Now, there is a real danger of frayed cables causing all sorts of mayhem in the air, so an inspection regime is not unreasonable, and is probably what the AD should have contained in the first place. I think there's a lot to be learned here, and let's hope the right people learn the right lessons.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...fpktsrV.99
MTF...P2 Tongue
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This week in the LMH - Wink

Via Oz flying:

Quote:..AOPA this week wrote to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull asking him to reconsider Badgerys Creek so as not to disrupt general aviation training in the Sydney basin. Nice try, but I can't see the federal government calling off the bulldozers over it. Badgerys Creek is one of the largest aviation infrastructure investments this or any other government has ever made in Australia, and the juggernaut has well and truly been set in motion. For AOPA to try to stop it now is a bit like trying to block a freight train with a rubber chicken. AOPA, and especially Executive Director Ben Morgan, know that already, which leads me to ask why the letter was written. I suspect this is all about groundwork; putting out there now the problems Badgerys Creek is going to cause to both Bankstown and Camden with a major airport right in the middle of their training area. Whilst I have no expert background to verify claims of a 40% increase in costs, it doesn't take much understanding to know that if you have to travel further to your training area its going to cost you more. In that, flying schools at these two airports have a valid claim to compensation, which should rightly be paid by the operator of the new airport. They'll have a fight on their hands, though, and I suspect the AOPA letter to the PM is the bell to start Round One.

But clearly Morgan is a man who believe credits goes where credit belongs, and this week penned another letter, this time to CASA Acting Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody telling him what a great job CASA has done by slashing medical certificate response times. This sort of stunned some people in the industry because AOPA (and most other associations) don't have a spectacular track record when it comes to acknowledging positive developments from the regulator (perhaps because of a scarcity of those?). Full kudos to Morgan and AOPA for this one; general aviation needs to be an environment of honesty and transparency on behalf of everyone or else our general direction will be one of backwards more than forwards. Let's hope CASA gives AOPA reasons to write more glowing letters in the next year or so.

And maybe some of those reasons might come from a complete revamp of the AVMED division? CASA this week published the responses to the medical discussion paper, which almost overwhelmingly said that AVMED was very broken and might just be beyond repair, to the point where CASA would be best to give up and adopt the driver's licence medical for PPLs. If CASA, for some off-planet reason, was not aware of the problems within AVMED or the current industry attitudes before, they certainly are now. But there is much more to this battle than the apparent front lines. Behind it all we are facing a stand-off between an industry that desperately needs reform and an aviation medical community that wants the status quo maintained, if not a tightening of regulations over what they currently are. Who wins? The industry case is compelling, urgent and supported by measured fact, but the other team is recognised as the experts and are very good at hiding self-interest behind blinding science and veiled hints at liability issues.

Quote: It may as well have been crickets for all the succour the AAA will get from it

You can't blame the Australian Airports Association for being "disappointed" with the federal government over the lack of regional airport funding in the budget. AAA spent a bit having a comprehensive economic study done that showed quite emphatically that money is needed right now or several regional airports may have to close. Minister Darren Chester replied with a litany of examples of how much the government was already spending. It may as well have been crickets for all the succour the AAA will get from it, given that the AAA had already pointed out the government funds were trickling down a narrow pipe when what was needed was a flood. It also ignores some practicalities, such as the Regional Aviation Access Program shutting out nearly every airport in Victoria and that the lion's share of the money went to airports with elevated movements of heavy jets, when it's the regionals serviced with 30-seat turbo-props that are in need of funding. Whilst we can acknowledge the money given to Mildura, Kangaroo Island and Bendigo, the lack of more instances makes it hard to see how the minister's response addresses adequately the concerns of the AAA.

Airservices Australia this week opened their weathercam portal. At this stage there are only six locations up there, but Kingscote on Kangaroo Island, Archerfield and the Kilmore Gap are amongst them. Really, there is absolutely no negative here: Dick Smith made the suggestion and put up $160,000 to kick-start it, Airservices saw the merit and launched the project in conjunction with the Bureau of Meteorology and got it started ASAP. This is the sort of reaction general aviation needs to progress and develop in a positive direction. I for one will make good use of the Kilmore Gap camera, and remember one day a few years back crossing Backstairs Passage when I would have given a copy of The Beatles' white album for a camera at Kingscote! But the network will cost maintenance dollars once it is established, as I suspect that could be done on a "use 'em or lose 'em" basis, so everybody ... let's use 'em.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...KXV0OBc.99



MTF...P2   Tongue
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LMH 26 May 2017... Wink

Hitch continues to keep us informed on all things GA- Via Oz Flying:
Quote:..Right now, several people in Canberra know who the new Director of Aviation Safety is. The CASA board has signed, sealed and delivered their recommendation to Minister for Transport Darren Chester. It is unthinkable that Chester will over-ride the final candidate, so what ever name is on that report is the person will probably get the gig. Is that name Shane Carmody? If we take the approach "what has he done to lose the job?" we don't come up with a lot of show-stoppers. If the board has really given priority to getting the ASRR recommendations embedded, and that mean bulldozing the pushback, then their selection needs to be someone who will get that done with the greatest efficiency and the least resistance. That's going to require not only a bull-headed stubbornness to stick to the program, but also a deft ability to make people within CASA believe that this is good for them too. Does Shane Carmody have that within him? Ask Senator Sterle. Carmody frustrated him to tears in senate estimates on Tuesday after stubbornly refusing to answer hypothetical questions about drone incidents.

Quote:Reforms that ultimately have no impact are probably a waste of time.

A meeting a couple of week ago between Shane Carmody and ASRR author David Forsyth seems to have ended amicably despite some opposing positions over whether or not ASRR recommendations have been completed. It's good to see these two critical people are workiing together try to get this over the line; we, the aviation community, have been waiting long enough. Also pleasing to see is Forsyth's comments that he intends to ask the industry how they think CASA is going. This will be the ultimate measure of progress, because it will tell if changes have been purely administrative or if they are having a real impact on the industry. Reforms that ultimately have no impact are probably a waste of time.

It seems to me that general aviation has been stuffed into a box marked "Inconvenient" when it comes to Badgerys Creek. The new forum held its first meeting today, and of 23 members, only two are likely to have the best interests of general aviation at heart: Sydney Metro Airports and the Regional Aviation Association of Australia (RAAA). Glaringly absent is AOPA, who are fuming in a corner after being told initially they'd get a seat. To the RAAA falls the herculean task of trying to get the word across that Badgerys Creek will severely stuff training operations from Bankstown. The priority for all of the other stakeholders is their own interests, and the fact that Bankstown will lose its training area with no viable options currently obvious won't derail their trains of thought. I can imagine some of the forum members with be hearing the term "training area" for the first time, even though the location of the new airport has been on the cards since the late 1980s. I do wonder if the RAAA's Mike Higgins really understands the magnitude of the weight that has been dropped on his shoulders.

Aviatex at Wings over Illawarra gave me an excellent opportunity to gauge opinions about how general aviation air shows and exhibitions need to be run, especially when it comes to Ausfly/OzKosh/AirVenture Australia at Narromine. The general vibe is that its a great idea executed in the wrong spot. Almost unanimously, exhibitors thought it needed to be closer to the major population areas of the east. When the concept of a national GA fly-in was first mooted, the driving force was the Sport Aircraft Association of Australia (SAAA), which is headquartered at Narromine, so it made sense that the event would be on their home patch. The big negative of Narromine is the limited accommodation and distance from just about anywhere but Dubbo. Consequently, Dubbo becomes the major catchment town to showcase GA to the general public; all the major cities are too remote to draw on. When asked where it should be, almost all exhibitors thought it had to be the Riverina district of NSW in a town large enough to cope with an influx of visitors with a regional airport that had significance for aviation. The computer kept spitting out the name Wagga Wagga. Of course only moving the event to see what happens can prove right from wrong. Is it time to take the risk?
How are you going with your Wings Awards nomination? With five weeks to go until submissions close (yes, 1 July is only five weeks away) you should be almost at the stage of starting to write it all up. Don't forget to address the criteria carefully. If you don't, the judges will find it hard to assess your nominee's suitability to win an award with the name Royal Aeronautical Society on it. There are many organisations and people out there that deserve recognition for what they do for general aviation, but they won't get considered unless they are nominated with a good submission. And don't forget, nominations for the Col Pay Award are perpetual, so put in a good one now and it will be considered again every year without you having to resubmit.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...rxXxtqW.99
And the Oz reports on our testicularly challenged NFI_6D, who it would seem is now jumping at shadows emanating from the big end of aviation town... Dodgy
Quote:Darren Chester rejigs AICC forum for more focused approach

[Image: b8a33f06faa3e25629cedd961c899a53?width=1024]
The federal government has overhauled a key aviation forum in a bid to ensure a “more ­focused” approach to the pressures on the industry.

Infrastructure and Transport Minister Darren Chester said the body that was known as the Aviation Industry Consultative Council will be restructured “to provide a more focused, strategic discussion of high-level issues ­affecting the aviation industry”.

The council was set up after the Coalition promised during the 2013 election campaign to strengthen the aviation industry, saying Labor had added costs to the bottom lines of airlines and airports. While the body was originally expected to meet twice a year, it produced a communique just three times.

Mr Chester said the new Aviation Strategic Leadership Forum was being set up after talks with the sector last year.

It will include the chief executives of major airlines and airports, officials from the Department of Infrastructure and Transport, and acting Civil Aviation Safety Authority boss Shane Carmody and Airservices Australia head Jason Harfield.

“All members have received invitations to join this group and have been advised that the first meeting will be scheduled in the middle of 2017,” Mr Chester said.

“I had the opportunity to meet some of the members during our aviation roundtable meeting at the Avalon airshow. While I have always continued to engage with our aviation leaders, the forum will provide the opportunity to bring them all together to discuss the challenges they all face and to discuss strat­egies in working through them.”

Mr Chester said the general aviation sector would be represented by Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia boss Martin Laverty. Mr Laverty also chairs the 12-member General Aviation Advisory Group.

Last year, highlighting the pressures on general aviation, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association issued a report critical of aviation bureaucracies that pointed to over-regulation as causing a dramatic decline in aircraft movements at secondary airports, reduction in aviation mechanical engineering apprenticeships and the destruction of small aviation businesses.

Mr Chester later announced a study into general aviation, saying it would be aimed at removing barriers to growth.

The study is expected to be finished mid-year. Mr Laverty’s group is focusing on areas including how to better promote general aviation.
     
Hmm...no comment - [Image: dodgy.gif]


MTF...P2
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Ticks - in boxes; and of the parasitic kind

Hepworth - “Mr Chester later announced a study into general aviation, saying it would be aimed at removing barriers to growth.” (the Oz)

We seem to have both; lots of. The parasitic type outnumbering those in boxes. The CASA operation as it stands is sucking the financial life blood from the economy and industry, it costs a significant amount of money to provide the ticked boxes; many of those boxes are only ticked with pencil and not initialled…

There is now a long list of the actual ‘costs’ incurred by operators attempting to gain ‘operational’ approval, not only in monetary terms but in man hours and lost opportunity. It is an impressive bill compiled over a two year period – from budget estimates to budget estimates. Perhaps Chester’s ‘new’ initiative could ask operators the cost of doing business with CASA.

A further impost – for no return has been the amount of ‘additional’ money government have thrown at inquiry and review. Difficult to cost but if we go back to the beginning of the ‘regulatory reform’ process; there has been a staggering amount of money spent on the endless merry-go-round. Which would be ‘acceptable’ had the investment born fruit. The simple fact is that it has not.

Despite the rhetoric and ‘feel-good’ waffle from Chester; more time and more money is being allocated to keep the treadmill operational. Why? We know the problems, we have solutions to those problems; so why is Chester hell bent on this farcical ‘review’ process.

The money could be saved and most problems resolved by taking two, small inexpensive steps forward. (1) appoint Fawcett to manage the discussion between Carmody and Forsyth and make the ASRR happen – but for real. That would be a tremendous stride forward. That one simple measure would go all the way to regaining industry confidence. (2) Open an inquiry into the actions of individual CASA officers – judicial would do the trick – let the cards fall where they may. This action would restore credibility, faith and return justice to the system, sending a clear message that CASA officers must act within the law and common decency.  

Within a six month the troubles within the industry would disappear; about half the amount of time Chester wants to waste having yet another useless report presented. Its Bollocks; Chester is only playing for time and votes; not for industry well being, CASA restructure or the mythical ‘reforms’. Tell me again how long the process has been running and what it is estimated amount Australia has spent, so far on the farce? Is that 30 years, over 400,000,000 million and still counting, you say. Well duck me.

Stellar stuff; great to see Darren 6D has got it ‘sussed’. That faery dust Glen Sterle is wanting must be obtainable somewhere; need to be careful though – imagine what the voters would think if a minister ended up looking like a high priest of some voodoo cult. There’s a happy thought.

Toot-toot.



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Of wasted energy

As I've said before, governments have had the good part of a century to fine tune the Westminster system of 'do nothing, make it look like you are doing everything, and avoid accountability'. Undertaking 'reviews', 'having consultation', 'doing studies', 'engaging in dialogue' 'formulating advisory groups' blah blah blah is all part of the game. It's a method of looking like you are proactively doing something while actually doing nothing. This is not by mistake. It's all craftily scoped into government frameworks. It IS how they do business.

Example; Government wants to extract more from the taxpayer but doesn't want to raise taxes or do anything that appears to be an an obvious dig into our pockets because they risk being voted out and losing the keys to their golden trough. So, they announce they are taxing bank profits. The banks hand over the money, but then raise as interest rates, fees and charges to compensate. The banks now look like pricks and Team Turdball then throw mud at the banks for being bastards to us poor little people. The point is that the government knew what it was doing and knows how to avoid blame and make it look like they are innocent.

I seriously doubt our industry will change. I would love to be wrong, but I doubt I am going to be. The Westminster system works well for the Pollywafflers, why would they want to change it? A system that has been built over 100 years is not going to be changed. And as for CAsA, well I've said it for years - the day that Aleck goes, Mike Smith becomes DAS and David Fawcett becomes Junior Minister for aviation is the day I will believe there is actually good in government, our systems and true democracy is here!

Sorry gents, it is time to hang up the epaulettes and engineering overalls and pick up a lawn mower, brickies trowel or nail gun as there is not one single sign that anything is about to change for the good.....

Chester, Albo, Truss, Joyce, Skidmark, McComick, Comardy, Aleck, Pumpkin Head.......You don't need more evidence than that.

TICK TOCK
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Quote:K's quote:
"We seem to have both; lots of. The parasitic type outnumbering those in boxes. The CASA operation as it stands is sucking the financial life blood from the economy and industry, it costs a significant amount of money to provide the ticked boxes; many of those boxes are only ticked with pencil and not initialled…

A further impost – for no return has been the amount of ‘additional’ money government have thrown at inquiry and review. Difficult to cost but if we go back to the beginning of the ‘regulatory reform’ process; there has been a staggering amount of money spent on the endless merry-go-round. Which would be ‘acceptable’ had the investment born fruit. The simple fact is that it has not.

Despite the rhetoric and ‘feel-good’ waffle from Chester; more time and more money is being allocated to keep the treadmill operational. Why? We know the problems, we have solutions to those problems; so why is Chester hell bent on this farcical ‘review’ process."


I agree with your sentiments K, its all so terribly depressing. One could understand the why if there seemed some logical reason for the wherefores, also if some tangible outcome was apparent, yet there's not a single shred of evidence that Australia for all the tens of thousands of pages of improbable criminal code regulation has produced any better safety outcomes than anywhere else in the world.

How often do we hear the "safety" mantra? its chant echo's across the past 50 years I have been involved in this industry, the almost Zen like drone one hears from a Buddhist temple or the cloisters of a monastery.

Australia's "enviable safety record" so often quoted by the "establishment" is a myth. Statistically we are no safer than anyone else in the so called first world, for all our mountains of paperwork, Australia is just lucky.  That luck will run out one day, Gobbles TICK TOCK is so poignant and somehow chilling.

The only tangible result of Australia's DYI regulation is the slow decline of a once vibrant industry. That decline is so patently obvious it beggars belief that the "Establishment" is, on current form, completely oblivious to it, completely ignoring what is right in front of their eyes and persisting with yet another enquiry. What was Einstein's definition of insanity?

How can the political elite completely ignore the hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars expended on a complete and utter failure?

How can the political elite stand by when rapacious McBank's of this world rape and pillage the Australian public at our primary Airports, a monopoly with no controls or oversight placed upon them to be fair to the users of those monopolies. Is 75 cents profit for every dollar spent in the car parks fair?, tell me any business who would not salivate on a 75% mark up for their product, with the added benefit of never having to pay tax on profits.

How can the political elite allow the intent of leases, acts of parliament and safety be subverted for the short term benefit of development sharks at secondary airports, the "Safety" imperative being completely ignored is criminal.

If the intent of Australia's DYI regulation is safety, which it patently has had very little to do with, what the hell is the point? CAsA, like a parasite is destroying its host, why?

Meanwhile across the ditch:
The weekend Australian

"Sky's the limit despite Rocket Lab mission's launch setback"

Rocket Lab, an American and NZ Company stuck a home made rocket 200 Km up, 100 km is generally considered outside the atmosphere.

The company was able to design, build and launch its rocket in roughly four years, with a lot of the structures required made in NZ. The company is in the gun to launch satellites weighing hundreds of kilograms for several million dollars, versus 10 or 20 times that for conventional launches.

Four years from design to launch!!! Why not Australia?

We've heard heaps of talk of an Australian space program in the past, but we have never even got close to launching anything?

Four years!! from start to launch!!! In Australia you'd still be on your fourth rewrite of your Operations Manual, half way through your occupational health and safety manual, not even started your environmental impact statement, and CAsA would be lobbying the government for more funds to employ a few hundred more staff to cope with the approvals.

The Kiwi's aligned their regulations with the US, took them around four years and cost around $5 million. Their regs are considered some of the best in the world, adopted by most countries in our region. Their aviation industry has grown to become the third biggest contributor to their GDP.

Australia has taken almost thirty years, expended $400 million to half finish its DYI regulations, which the whole world shakes its head at.

"The lucky country"?? think our luck is about to run out and Gobbles prophecy become reality.
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LMH 02/06/17: Hitch on AOPA new board members etc.

Via the Yaffa:

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 2 June 2017

I have this impression in my mind of sleeves being rolled up all around the AOPA hangar at Bankstown. They've added some heavy-hitters to the board that have the potential to add some serious power and credibility to their advocacy efforts. Perhaps the artillery among the new crop is former CASA Deputy Director of Aviation Safety Mike Smith (not the same bloke who flew a SeaRey around the world). Mike is perhaps one of the most credentialed and respected figures in aviation, and was recently very disappointed not to be given a crack at the DAS job in the wake of Mark Skidmore departing. Although he lives in the USA, standby for him to make a big impact on AOPA's influence and ability in Canberra. And if you look at all the new board members, you'll see plenty of skill and street cred amongst tthem; skill and street cred that is coupled with a passion for aviation and a determination to stand up no only for themselves, but for the entire aviation community. There's a lot of work to be done, and you'd be hard-pressed to find a better team to do it.

And speaking of the DAS position, we're still in the dark about who will take over as new CASA boss. However, I am told reliably that the decision is made and the press release just about drafted. We'd know already had it not been for the tragic Renmark crash that claimed three fellow aviators, a senior CASA person amongst them. Right now the shock waves from the crash are still reverberating through Aviation House, and we won't be told who the new DAS is until things settle down a bit. I believe we should know by this time next week.

Quote:This is the culmination of a lot of hard work and persistent dreaming

Great news for GippsAero and Australia! Both CASA and the FAA have issued type certificates for the Airvan 10. This is a 10-seat single-engine turbo-prop (SETP) designed to slot in between the large piston singles and the current crop of utility SETPs. Not only is it cheaper to buy and operate, but also the gap in skills needed to fly the Airvan 8 and C206, and the Airvan 10, is not as great as it would be if you were stepping up to a Caravan. This is the culmination of a lot of hard work and persistent dreaming on behalf of the entire GippsAero team, and it's a credit to the skills and ingenuity of Australia's aviation workforce. I flew this aeroplane several weeks ago, and I can tell you it is a remarkable machine that is the ideal utility for just about every operation you can think of. Much more about that is in the July-August print issue of Australian Flying.

The Historical Aircraft Restoration Society has done it again. When other museums are scrambling for cash and volunteers just to stay open, HARS seems to be going from strength to greater strength. It was not that long ago that they scored Qantas' first Boeing 747-400 for a static exhibit, and now actor John Travolta has donated to them his B707. With the number of multi engine aircraft they have airworthy, the maintenance and fuel bills must be greater than a politician's perks, yet they have established themselves as perhaps the pre-eminent active museum in Australia ... and right on Sydney's doorstep. Of course a lot of their success can be attributed to the squadron of ex-QF people working there, but that's not to discount the passion and commitment shown by the entire committee of management and workforce. It's all great for aviation in Australia.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...3o7XkDv.99
MTF...P2 Cool
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CASA Comardy Capers confirmed - Rolleyes

Via Oz Aviation:

Shane Carmody confirmed as permanent CASA DAS
June 7, 2017 By australianaviation.com.au

Shane Carmody has been appointed director of aviation safety at the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for a five year term. Carmody, who was … [url=http://australianaviation.com.au/2017/06/shane-carmody-confirmed-as-permanent-casa-das/][/url]


Via Oz Flying:


[Image: Shane_Carmody.jpg]CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody. (Steve Hitchen)

CASA confirms Carmody as Permanent CEO
7 June 2017

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has announced this morning that Acting Director of Aviation Safety (DAS) and CEO Shane Carmody has been appointed to the role permanently.
Carmody took over as Acting DAS after Mark Skidmore quit the role in October of last year.

"Shane Carmody brings a wealth of senior executive experience to the position of Director of Aviation Safety at CASA,” CASA Chariman Jeff Boyd said.

“He has led large teams of operational, technical and regulatory support staff, providing leadership for operational, training and corporate functions within a regulatory environment.
“Shane has had an outstanding government career, holding executive appointments at the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, the Department of Defence and the Repatriation Commission.

According to Boyd, the new DAS was chosen after an international search to find the right person for the job. Carmody has had a long career in public service including in defence security intelligence, veterans affairs and a three-year stint as Deputy DAS to Bruce Byron in 2006-9.

“CASA’s Board has full confidence that under the continued leadership of Shane Carmody, Australia’s excellent aviation safety record can be further enhanced," Boyd added.
Carmody has been appointed to the role for five years.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...4rLwFyT.99
 

And from Fort Fumble central HQ:
Quote:New director of Aviation Safety
Date of Publication: Wednesday 7th June

Mr Shane Carmody has been appointed as the Director of Aviation Safety at the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).

The chairman of CASA’s Board Mr Jeff Boyd announced the five year appointment today.

Mr Carmody has been acting in the role since October 2016 and brings extensive experience in senior government to the role at CASA.

“Shane Carmody brings a wealth of senior executive experience to the position of Director of Aviation Safety at CASA,” Mr Boyd said.

“Shane has worked in high profile federal government agencies and has a strong appreciation of the role CASA plays in the aviation sector, having previously worked for CASA as Deputy Chief Executive Officer from 2006 to 2009.

“He has led large teams of operational, technical and regulatory support staff, providing leadership for operational, training and corporate functions within a regulatory environment.

“Shane has had an outstanding government career, holding executive appointments at the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, the Department of Defence and the Repatriation Commission.

“The new Director of Aviation Safety was chosen after an international search for the best available person to further develop CASA as a world leader in aviation safety regulation.

“CASA’s Board has full confidence that under the continued leadership of Shane Carmody, Australia’s excellent aviation safety record can be further enhanced.

“Shane is committed to working with the aviation industry and the wider aviation community to achieve the best possible safety outcomes.

“He understands safety is a shared responsibility with the aviation industry and will ensure that the interests of the travelling public are paramount.”

Shane Carmody career highlights

October 2016 Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety
April 2016 – October 2016 Deputy Secretary, Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development.
June 2014 – April 2016 Deputy Secretary / Chief Executive Officer, Department of Veterans’ Affairs
June 2009 – June 2014 Deputy President of the Repatriation Commission; member Military, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission
October 2006 – October 2009 Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Civil Aviation Safety Authority
January – October 2006 Deputy Secretary Intelligence and Security, Department of Defence
July 2002 – December 2005 Deputy Secretary Strategy, Department of Defence
June 2001 - January 2002 Deputy Secretary Intelligence and Security, Department of Defence

Media contact: Amanda Palmer

0419 296 446
amanda.palmer@casa.gov.au
MR4717
“..The new Director of Aviation Safety was chosen after an international search for the best available person to further develop CASA as a world leader in aviation safety regulation..."

So the neutered/Iron ring captured Muppet Boyd wasted time & resources scouring the world for the best available person and the whole time that person happened to be in Can'tberra - yeah right and pigs might fly... Dodgy  

MTF...P2 Tongue
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"October 2016 Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety
April 2016 – October 2016 Deputy Secretary, Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development.
June 2014 – April 2016 Deputy Secretary / Chief Executive Officer, Department of Veterans’ Affairs
June 2009 – June 2014 Deputy President of the Repatriation Commission; member Military, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission
October 2006 – October 2009 Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Civil Aviation Safety Authority
January – October 2006 Deputy Secretary Intelligence and Security, Department of Defence
July 2002 – December 2005 Deputy Secretary Strategy, Department of Defence
June 2001 - January 2002 Deputy Secretary Intelligence and Security, Department of Defence"

Another career Mandarin installed by the "Iron Ring" to ensure Australia continues down the road as an International Joke and ensuring their trough privileges remain intact. The corrupt scum bags win again, the industry loses again.

Oh well, there's always New Zealand suppose, Australia is screwed.
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LMH on AOPA, cables and Comardy Capers - Rolleyes

Via the Yaffa yesterday Wink :

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]


The Last Minute Hitch: 9 June 2017

When Darren Chester announced last year that he was sending Shane Carmody into CASA until they could find a replacement for Mark Skidmore, the general aviation industry at large greeted the decision with muted mutterings of "not a bad decision." Indeed there were a few less-muted calls to just give him the damn job and be done with it. Carmody was considered a good operator who wore a white hat when it came to sensibility and efficiency. This week he was confirmed as the CEO and Director of Aviation Safety for the next five years, but already some industry commentators have switched sides based on Carmody's performance as Acting DAS. Part of that, I believe, is simply because GA in particular didn't get its preferred candidate, and part is because Carmody failed to press a magic switch at Aviation House that fixed everything instantly ... as if that was possible. Anyone who believes that there is an instant fix clearly doesn't understand depth of the mire in which CASA is entrenched. Even if he wore his underpants on the outside, Shane Carmody can't save the day simply by the act of arriving. This is a bureaucracy that hasn't completed a reform project after 29 years; you don't sort that out with a magic wand, you sort it out with hard work and a lot of personal perspiration. We are about to see exactly how close Carmody is prepared to put his nose to the grindstone, and as an aviation community it is our job to make sure he knows where the grindstone is.

Quote:many aircraft owners would have already complied and junked perfectly good cables in the process

And if you want an example of the standard of some of the work coming from CASA, I present to you Airworthiness Directive AD/GENERAL/87. To put it in the simplest terms, this AD told aircraft owners to throw out any control cables older than 15 years. So that means any aircraft built after 2002 was in the gun. In a GA perspective 15 years is still a new aeroplane! Someone in CASA has revised the requirement to "inspect and throw out if damaged", which is probably what the original AD should have said. Of course, many aircraft owners would have already complied and junked perfectly good cables in the process, and now AOPA Australia wants to measure exactly how many were replaced and what condition they were in. The idea is to gauge the depth of the impact crater this AD had on GA, and compile a report. If the report shows a smoking hole in the operating costs of aircraft owners, you can bet it will be used as waddy to beat CASA with.

Speaking of AOPA, they're also spreading their wings further and seeking people to represent them on the various Regional Airspace and Procedures Advisory Committees (RAPAC) around Australia. RAPACs convene on a regular basis to discuss regional issues concerning the way we use the airspace and provide recommendations and feedback to CASA. RAPACs mostly work under the radar, but occasionally will get involved with more high-profile issues such as the low-level frequency debate that has been going on for over a year. It's voluntary work, but you'll get involved with some very important work. If you're up for it, contact Ben Morgan at AOPA ben.morgan@aopa.com.au

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...FTXPG41.99
MTF...P2 Tongue
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All HAIL the career bureaucrat - err maybe? Confused  

Previously:

(06-10-2017, 12:05 PM)Peetwo Wrote: LMH on AOPA, cables and Comardy Capers - Rolleyes

Via the Yaffa yesterday Wink :

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]


The Last Minute Hitch: 9 June 2017

When Darren Chester announced last year that he was sending Shane Carmody into CASA until they could find a replacement for Mark Skidmore, the general aviation industry at large greeted the decision with muted mutterings of "not a bad decision." Indeed there were a few less-muted calls to just give him the damn job and be done with it. Carmody was considered a good operator who wore a white hat when it came to sensibility and efficiency. This week he was confirmed as the CEO and Director of Aviation Safety for the next five years, but already some industry commentators have switched sides based on Carmody's performance as Acting DAS. Part of that, I believe, is simply because GA in particular didn't get its preferred candidate, and part is because Carmody failed to press a magic switch at Aviation House that fixed everything instantly ... as if that was possible. Anyone who believes that there is an instant fix clearly doesn't understand depth of the mire in which CASA is entrenched. Even if he wore his underpants on the outside, Shane Carmody can't save the day simply by the act of arriving. This is a bureaucracy that hasn't completed a reform project after 29 years; you don't sort that out with a magic wand, you sort it out with hard work and a lot of personal perspiration. We are about to see exactly how close Carmody is prepared to put his nose to the grindstone, and as an aviation community it is our job to make sure he knows where the grindstone is...

& via Chester's popular thread... Big Grin
Quote:[Image: c8ef7005b97eb6a98406866e4cc4b1fe.jpg]

..The miniscule’s last move came on the very last tick of the time clock; he has brought the Queens castle into the game; in the guise of a newly anointed director of aviation safety (silly name) or; boss CASA, the erstwhile Carmody. The popular ‘Australian Flying’ magazine asset ‘Hitch’ has penned another balanced, sensible comment on this appointment which is worth the time to read. Indeed, the article should, if matters aeronautical were ‘normal’, mark the end of the topic. Regrettably, this is not the case...

The miniscule has now put in place on the AOC (aviation obfuscation chessboard) what he obviously believes is an effective (smoke) screen of Muppet chess pieces - Harfwit, High viz Hoody & Comardy capers... [Image: undecided.gif]  

Perhaps it is time to highlight what in fact 6D has now put at stake in his blind faith that his Muppet minions (2 pawns & a castle), will be able to obfuscate the potential A-word embarrassments for a further two years in the King's court... [Image: biggrin.gif]

Quoting Comardy's miniscule swearing of allegiance at Senate Estimates:

Quote: Wrote:Mr Carmody : No, I do not take into account the retail sector, but the statement of expectations from my minister is very clear:

… focus on aviation safety as the highest priority …

…   …   …

… consider the economic and cost impact on individuals, businesses and the community in the development and finalisation of new— regulations and regulatory changes.

CHAIR: Yes.

Mr Carmody : And take 'a pragmatic, practical and proportionate approach to regulation as it applies' to different industry sectors. I am fulfilling that mandate.
 
Quoting further from the 6D FF decree to which CC (above) says he will comply:
Quote: Wrote:4.        Key Aviation Initiatives
I expect CASA, in conducting its responsibilities as the aviation safety regulator, to have regard to the following key aviation initiatives:

(a)   changes taking place in relation to air traffic services, including Airservices Australia’s (Airservices) new operating model and the transition to a new air traffic management system under the OneSKY Project;

Q/ So have we established, beyond reasonable doubt, that CC (Comardy Capers) is the miniscule's Muppet?;

..or is it as "K" alludes in the SBG - if push comes to shove Big Grin :  
Quote:This hapless minister needs to disavow, immediately, the notion that Mrdak, the department, Carmody or Aleck are there to keep him squeaky clean. They will, without any hesitation, throw him under the first bus which challenges the status quo. Ask John Sharp, he'll tell you - that and more.

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS61ABP4ua4pfgUEP5IO0Z...lBAJZenAUA]

“ Nations thus tempted to interfere are not always able to resist the counsels of seeming expediency and ungenerous ambition, although measures adopted under such influences seldom fail to be unfortunate and injurious to those adopting them”. Lincoln.

To put it another way, is CC merely a bureaucratic footstool appointed by the government to filter out all the unwanted white noise emanating from the IOS; or is he actually a sleeper but crucial member of the FF 'Iron Ring'??

Leadsled off the UP seems to be of the opinion that CC is the real deal 'ministerial (yes Minister) bureaucrat':
Quote:Folks,

Now that Shane Carmody has been confirmed in the job, at least let us hope he gets on with the job, putting substance to the comments he has made so far.

He is up against it, as I hear he has already had the "Iron Ring", present iteration, blocking him doing some of the things he wanted/tried to do as "Acting".

Top of the list simply must be injecting some rational risk management into all CASA activities --- starting off with medical standards --- we have a "driver's license" medical that isn't, for the RPL, and the travesty of what has been done on Colour Vision should be immediately reversed, and the AAT decision that served us so well for so many years, become the standard again.

There is no reason (and the "CASA Kultcha" is not a reason) why we have to have medical standards that are so much tougher than USA, and long standing reforms reversed.

Even at this stage, it is not too late to bring the "ADS-B" mandate into line with risk management criteria, and have a mandate more in line with USA/EU, preferable even more limited, given the very limited traffic in the greater volume of airspace than US or western Europe. ---- and "being fair" to all the poor sods who have already spent millions is not a reason to maintain the present mandate.

Unfortunately a non-aviation CEO/DAS needs expert input for his decision making, and I see evidence that such genuine (as opposed to self-confessed) expertise is pretty thin on the ground ---- with the possible exception of obtaining draconian judgements in cases of trivial regulatory infringements.

Tootle pip!!
  
Personally I am a little suspect to why a career bureaucrat on the up could possibly want a possible poisoned chalice like the FF CEO position... Huh 

However I have no real opinion at this point in time but I do feel (like LS) that CC needs to hit the ground running... Rolleyes

 MTF...P2 Cool

PS Having been tasked to hunt around in the CC skeleton closet by the BRB, one thing I find a little odd on the  MR 'career highlights' is that after Byron was given the boot (Feb 2009), that for five months CC apparently held two jobs?
Quote:June 2009 – June 2014 Deputy President of the Repatriation Commission; member Military, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission

October 2006 – October 2009 Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Civil Aviation Safety Authority
  
Yet when you refer to the June 2009 CASA Org chart - see HERE - it would appear that CC's position was waiting to be filled (2nd row 1st blue box LHS)

Oh well maybe it is a typo... Huh
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