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CASA meets the Press
Once more unto the library.

Once more unto the library, dear friends, once more
Or, plug up the holes with our reforming dead. (Sorry Henry)..

One can almost picture Hitch, sitting on the back veranda, coffee mug, pile of Tim Tam, ever ready camera at his elbow, lap top open in front, taking a last look at the garden before plunging into the latest convection from whoever writes the dribble signed by the minister. I admire his fortitude and forbearance; but, how can you do it without ‘the bucket’ close to hand?  

Hitch “Consequently, it's hard to approach this predicted end to the epic reform program with any confidence.”

The hard, cold, demonstrable truth requires little reading – certainly not a Tim Tam’s worth. A succession of similar missives have been published, all promising the world and delivering an Atlas. It is abundantly clear that CASA have no intention, none, whatsoever of reforming themselves, or the regulations in any way. The system suits, the power base unshakeable, the minister will follow the advice and industry will be left to carry the regulatory burden and shoulder the outrageous costs, delays, criminal charges, strict liability, manipulation, embuggerance and terminal stupidity, no matter the twaddle that the silly, disinterested minister signs his name to.

Well done Hitch; getting through to p23 is a fine effort. In the Aunty Pru library, there are 30 years worth of ‘ministerial’ statements; all relating to the reform of both regulator and regulations. If you ever get the time, inclination or opportunity, drop into the house boat one day and read through them. You will see, exactly, how it’s all been said before, the pattern has never changed, the result inevitable and entirely predictable after you have read through a scant half dozen. Sad, expensive, pointless, but eminently true is the saga of no reform. All there, on the record. Ludicrous (refer Einstein or Twain on insanity).

Not Hitch:

[Image: Mark_Twain%2C_New_Hampshire%2C_1905.JPG]
Toot toot.
Reply
This week's LMH off the Yaffa - Wink

Quote:–  Steve Hitchen

I have to confess to being one of those annoying people that doesn't believe in karma or "signs" that the universe is trying to tell me something, until I get one that is so strong it can't be ignored. Then I'm not only on the bandwagon, I'm driving it! In the past week we have seen the Bristell crash at Clyde North, the tragic beach landing in Portugal and the video of the C150 attempt to land on a highway. Each of these incidents turned out badly, and there are still people in hospital. None of us are currently in a position to say with any integrity what happened, but in time we will find out. However, it did have me scrambling for my logbook to find out when I last did a practice forced landing. It was during my AFR in June last year, and unless my memory is playing tricks (again!) I turned an easy exercise into a flying disaster. Prior to that, I hadn't done PFLs since my Jabiru training in 2013. That's nowhere near often enough to stay competent. So, next week I've booked a plane and instructor to do an hour of PFLs. I mean, you can't ignore the signs, can you?

Quote:... this is what happens when things get professional ...

Airventure Australia has received a boost from its sponsorship deal with OzRunways; a significant sum I am told that has probably made the event a possibility. And with that commercial arrangement has come exclusivity, which means we won't be seeing the AvPlan stand at the event this year. That's a shame because AvPlan has been a big supporter of the Narromine weekend since its inception. However, this is what happens when things get professional, and it seems to me that's what the organising consortium (RAAus, SAAA, APF) is trying to do with Narromine. Neither the consortium nor OzRunways can be blamed for striking a deal so beneficial to both of them. But what will this do to the relationship between OzRunways and AvPlan, which has been historically amicable? I suspect the two are about to get competitive at a level we've not yet seen.
The new Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC) rules are now in force. We could argue until we all fall down about whether or not the new measures are necessary, but it's pretty clear they will have a huge impact on private pilots around the country. The new regs state that we can't have our documents verified by the usual JP/police/solicitor/pharmacist anymore, but only by someone who is a trained agent of the Issuing Body. Furthermore, we can't mail the documents, but have to present them in person. The government continues to call these new rule "improvements", but the general aviation community seems to prefer the term "impediments". With so few ASIC Issuing Bodies in Australia (and one less now RAAus has thrown in the towel), it is becoming increasingly hard to get an ASIC because of where these companies are. And even if they do set up an agency in your area, you will be paying more for your ASIC because the agents are unlikely to do it free.

Our sister publication, Flightpath, has its latest issue on the shelves and in the letterboxes now! If warbirds and antique aeroplanes are your thing, you'd do well to get hold of a copy soonest you can!

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...SxX6ugX.99
Also a rehash of the Annabel Hepworth Oz article - Dick Smith: General Aviation Sector faces ruin - with comments... Rolleyes

Quote:...The number of general aviation aircraft that are flying has fallen further, sparking warnings by businessman and aviation veteran Dick Smith that the sector faces “destruction”.

Mr Smith issued the warning about the challenges facing the general aviation sector as recent figures from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics show that the number of active aviation aircraft doing GA work was 8976 in 2015.

This is a fall on the year prior, when there were 10,034 active aircraft in GA operations. In 2013, there were 10,173 aircraft, although this was up on the 9448 ­recorded in 2012. Mr Smith lamented that “less and less” people were flying.
“It’s absolutely criminal what’s happening to general aviation. It’s the basis for airline pilot training,” Mr Smith told The Australian.

“It’s very serious ... it’s basically the destruction of an industry.”

As evidence of the decline in the sector, Mr Smith pointed to the serious difficulties he had in attempting to getting his beloved Cessna Citation serviced.

Mr Smith sold the Citation last year, saying at the time that it was “simply too expensive to keep it running in Australia with the regulations we are forced to comply with”.

The warning comes after it emerged last month that a landmark review into the costs and red tape impacting the sector has been delayed. While the report, also being conducted by BITRE, was expected to be finished by June 30, it will now be finalised in “coming months”, the office of Infrastructure and Transport Minister Darren Chester indicated recently.

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia executive director Benjamin Morgan said the BITRE data highlighted a decline in some of the biggest areas of aviation activity.

The Australian has confirmed that AOPA has written to Mr Chester and Civil Aviation Safety Authority boss Shane Carmody drawing attention to the figures.

In a letter last week, Mr Morgan also attached 57 pages of comments from participants in a petition on saving Australia’s general aviation industry.

The BITRE data showed that by hours flown, training was down by 5.6 per cent in 2015 over 2014, and had fallen by 14.5 per cent in 2014 over 2013. Survey and photography work was also well down.

“This isn’t surprising considering that our pilot number graphs and avgas sales numbers all show a 35 per cent decline over the past 10 years,” Mr Morgan said.

He said AOPA’s economic modelling conservatively suggested the decline in the sector over the past five years “translates to a half-billion-dollar loss to the broader Australian economy”.

“AOPA Australia firmly believes the declines have continued through 2016 and are forecast to accelerate through 2017, unless genuine reforms are initiated,” Mr Morgan said. It was alarming that the report showed that one in five aircraft were now unused, because this meant a share of the fleet was “no longer providing an economic contribution to the industry”.

The report showed there were 1367 aircraft zero flying hours where the owners blamed repair, maintenance or restoration work.

The data also showed hours flown for non-scheduled commercial air transport — charter flights — was down 10.9 per cent in 2015 from 2014, and had fallen 17.9 per cent in 2014 over 2013....


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Tim1 DAY AGO


I operated a specialist aviation repair company since 1995 . In 2016 I had enough of struggling to keep it afloat after roughly five years of decline in my client base largely caused by the dramatic increase in regulatory burden during that time created by the onerous and protracted regulation overhaul which had numerous direction changes and ended up so burdensome it made small companies like mine unviable and so I closed it down before it destroyed me financially .
There are many stories like mine over that period .


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Bing1 DAY AGO



Make it easier and cheaper for folks to fly. Pick from my list or add to the list:
1. For PPL, a checkup by a GP should suffice. Compare it to the expensive bureaucratic CASA system now?!
2. Make military airspace ICAO sized. For example folks can't fly in the beautiful Hawkesbury and Shoalhaven easily because the military has too much airspace, crowding out GA.Most Mil training is on simulators anyway.
3. Don't treat GA pilots and their friends like criminals and terrorists - especially at Albury Airport. They are taxpayers and usually just need the toilets or a drink after re-fuel.
4. Airport landing fees for GA is way too high. Aboriginal run airports charge up to $500 for one landing and nearly $3 per litre for fuel.
5. Why introduce full security screenings at small airports like Dubbo? What a waste of money when you can hop the fence at airports even closer to Sydney?
6. Stop building $5m to $10m fences at places like Thargomindah, Numbulwar, etc. Really, there are cheaper ways to keep out camels and feral animals. Spend the money instead on fostering aviation.
7. Change CASA's charter to include, ".... the fostering of GA in Australia". Otherwise, they'll legislate till there are no GA aircraft in Australia left and they are so stupid they don't realise they'll eventually lose their jobs too.
8. Stop flying 40-50 inspectors around especially to Avalon so they can ramp check and bully GA pilots camping next to their aeroplanes. Grounding a 2 seater plane because there isn't an EXIT sign on the door ... really??

Don't overthink this. Sack lazy and harmful bureaucrats, bring in more performance based salaries and set a mission for CASA to encourage general aviation - not just kill it...

Now give me that $500,000 CEO salary and I'll fix it. On the other hand I'd rather be the Postmaster and earn $5.6m. Carry on....





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philip1 DAY AGO



CASA's role is aviation safety and so they write rules, change rules, hold meetings about rules and police their many rules, seemingly without regard for their impact on smaller aviation businesses and pilots. Many private pilots have a view that CASA might be happier if private pilots and general aviation withered away so CASA only had to manage airlines. CASA is too often seen as an officious dead hand on general aviation.

General aviation provides a massive economic benefit for Australia but it is not as abvious as many other industries because it involves many smaller operators located away from city centres. Unfortunately the Federal government has not seen fit to have any program to support or promote this vital industry, just to regulate it.

The FAA, which regulates safety in the USA, actually has as one of its responsibilities, to encourage and develop civil aeronautics.
Why can't CASA, or Air Services, also have a similar responsibility so their rules and decisions have to support all civil aviation, including general aviation?



Phillip23 HOURS AGO


@philip Yes it always has been one of those"are we here for them or are they here for us" scenarios. 


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Phil17 HOURS AGO



Yes Philip, that is the first and more important cause in the destruction of GA in Australia.
Only reforming of CASA back to the dual role of Safety and Development of aviation (a CAA) will begin this process, everything else is just words.




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Phil18 HOURS AGO

CASA's offical motto should be :
We're not happy till your not happy.
Smile



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Phil18 HOURS AGO



CASAs moto is "safe skys for all".
An empty sky is a safe sky so I guess they have their wish.


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Anthony15 HOURS AGO


I flew as a private glider and private pilot for many years but the endless grind of casa nonsense wore me down now i race Porsche's at a fraction of the expense and without my partner stressing.

The cost of LAME's is a major problem as is the cost of fuel, the greening of australia isnt free.
 
 
MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
Oz Aviation: Division in the ranks - again!!?? Undecided

From this week's LMH and in an article series by 'that man' it would appear the Alphabets are embarking on a campaign of self-destruction and internal political squabbling -

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]


The Last Minute Hitch: 11 August 2017
10 August 2017

Steve Hitchen

If my mum was here now, she would get RAAus, SAAA, APF, OzRunways, AOPA and AvPlan and bang their heads together! This week in general aviation has been one of the most dire, disappointing and disastrous imaginable. The finger-pointing, accusing and (yes) direct lying that has been going on about the OzRunways sponsorship deal for AirVenture Australia has put the event in jeopardy. Contradiction has followed contradiction, burying the truth deep beneath a pile of vested interest and political posturing. And once again, GA loses; fractured with rivalry and opinion as various different people claim to represent the best interests of the aviation community. So who is the guilty party, the great evil one? It's impossible to tell; guilt can be determined only once true facts are known, and at the moment, despite many claims to the contrary, it seems no-one actually has the true facts in hand. So here's what is known: OzRunways took out major sponsorship that did not include exclusivity. When the AirVenture organisers needed a bit more cash, OzRunways upped their investment, which triggered the exclusivity deal. Consequently, AvPlan was told they couldn't go, and several other companies had conditions placed on them attending, including stalwart Paul Bennet Airshows, which is sponsored by AvPlan. Beyond that, the trail of facts disappears into a dark and whispering fen* that is almost impossible to navigate. The path has led to accusations of smear campaigns, conspiracy theories that run right to the minister's office, power struggles and lawyers being briefed. Now OzRunways has pulled out their major investment, blaming a "membership organisation" that it says leaked the commercial agreement.

Quote:..aviation in Australia needs that complete support today, tomorrow, the rest of the year and well into the foreseeable future..

So are we going to see a unified air show and exhibition at Narromine in October? With only a couple of months to go, can the aviation community possibly heal itself in time? If we want an AirVenture, the healing has to happen. The industry has to put this behind itself and get on with putting together an air show, exhibition and fly-in that is so crucial to the ongoing viablility of general, sport and recreational aviation in Australia. But most importantly, it has to be an event for every one of us; every company, every pilot, every organisation ... because without any one, we don't have complete support, and aviation in Australia needs that complete support today, tomorrow, the rest of the year and well into the foreseeable future. We, the eclectic and enthusiastic keepers of the aviation future, have to recognise some serious mistakes and step up the make sure AirVenture Australia 2017 happens and is successful. Ask yourself this: who wins if AirVenture doesn't go ahead? Then ask: who loses if AirVenture doesn't go ahead? The answer to the first question is "no-one" and the answer to the second is "everybody in aviation". Make no mistake, we have reached a breaking point, and if we can't find a way forward together then how can we ever convince Canberra that our industry, our community, is worth saving.

CASA's discussion paper on drone regulation is now ready for industry comments. This may be just a fringe issue to many of us who are still struggling with AirVenture, Part 61, rising rents, SIDs and every other spear in the side that is depleting our lifeblood at the moment, but you can bet it's very important to the drone community, which I have no doubt will be pouring feedback into CASA. If the general aviation community takes a stand-off approach to this, then the feedback from the drone people is all they will have. It's probably a critical enough issue for general aviation to take notice and speak up, or we certainly won't be listened to on this topic in the future.

To finish on a happy note, I was stoked to see that Warbirds over Scone is back on the calendar! This was for several years a well-attended and well-run air show in a great location. It's bound to be another stonker of an event, so put it in your diary, get a plane organised and make sure you're there in the crowd when Scone goes off in March next year.

*thanks to Glenn Richards for this line. Great lyrics.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...2zRIUcR.99

&.. from the Regional airlines vs the Pilots battlefront:

Chester's regional airport security clusterduck cont/-

..plus the CAO 48.1 WOFTAM:

Quote:And if you wanted an example of just how inept and totally risk-based our big R, WOFTAM regulator is, take a look the latest on the CAO 48.1 debacle - see HERE & yet again today in the Oz [Image: dodgy.gif] : FAA vs CASA: Point of difference. 

Quote: Wrote:CASA’s delays on pilot review spurs concern
[Image: 1de6327bd6ef981304021131f9f99792?width=650]New safety rules for pilots have been further delayed by specialists conducting a review.
  • Annabel Hepworth
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM August 11, 2017

Pilots have voiced fresh concerns at delays by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority over the introduction of new rules on pilot flight and duty time limits.

CASA this week announced the appointment of a team of specialists to conduct a review of the aviation fatigue rules for operators and pilots.

In a statement, CASA confirmed it would extend the implementation of new fatigue rules by six months to allow sufficient time for the recommendations of the review to be considered.

Australian and International Pilots Association vice-president Shane Loney said he understood why there was a delay but was “disappointed this is still going on”.

“We’re disappointed at how slow it is,” he said.

The pilots’ group says Australia is ahead of other countries by introducing the regime but the Regional Aviation Association of Australia argues the new rules impose costs without a commensurate safety gain.

M&M to aviation safety minions: "...I love it when a plan comes together...with gay abandon, let the aviation safety obfuscation games continue.."  Big Grin


MTF...P2 Confused
Reply
Sandy in reply to Hitch - Rolleyes

Quote:My comment which is awaiting Steve's review for publishing on his website, or not, tba.

Hitch does well to provide us with the news of infighting and highlighting the issues that cause problems such as the Narromine airshow contretemps. Narrow and mine can be two words that sum up commercial battles in any field and this is why we have anti monopoly law in Australia.

But I take issue with Hitch on his question "how can we convince Canberra that our industry, our community, is worth saving " on his premise that Canberra is entitled to fiddle while GA burns owing to GA's lack of unity.

Hitch, with respect your take on this is wrong and plays directly into the hands of the Canberra cabal that is bent on preserving pre eminence, privilege, exceptional salaries, working conditions and Winter time excursions on all expenses paid junkets, points North.

One could easily understand from your stance, your common thread, that General Aviation only has to mature, and be of one voice, before we can expect any reforms that might slow or halt the disastrous decline of "our industry, our community ".

In other words you firmly, with shades of patronising, put blame and fault onto the collective of "our industry ".

This will not pass;  this overlooks the scandalous lack of responsibility demonstrated by those whom we employ and pay, firstly the politicians, and secondly what used to be known as the public service. Those that we pay and expect through our democratic and civilised institutions to resolve the competing interests of individuals and groups of individuals with fairness. Governing efficiently allows freedom and prosperity.

GA is being tortured to death and in such a stressful environment its a wonder that there's not more internecine warfare. 

Hitch, I could take you on an excursion around Australia and find hundreds or thousands of abandoned airstrips, closed refueling facilities and closed flying schools (Google Earth for abandoned airfields). Yes its good when we find voice together and a resurgent AOPA gives hope, but we are in a fight and to blame what's left of GA for the current impasse with a do nothing Minister is simply assisting the enemy.
Reply
E bloody nuff - already.

I find, I can live quiet happily with the ‘private’ end of GA tearing itself apart; the contribution to the ‘economy of scale’ just don’ t signify. Same as a golf club – or tennis club – even the local RSL – all tearing at each other with internal – highly personalised – “politics”. That’s their affair and of little interest to me.

But, when the financial or ego fuelled spats become a weapon for the ‘powers that be’ then; it is time to say something. These insignificant, small minded quarrels are like the kids playing up before lights out. One tolerates it – for a short while before the magic words – “if you don’t knock it off - I’m sending Mum up there”.

The ‘real-deal’ GA belongs to the AOC holders; those operating turbine aircraft, lifting heavy loads, doing charters and providing not only useful service, but employment and taxable revenue. It belongs to those who have vision and buy jet aircraft to meet a perceived market demand. GA belongs to those who build up flight schools, invest the house and the kids education in bringing that dream to a reality. The petty squabbles of minority groups cannot possibly be of any significance, whatsoever, in the great scheme of risk and investment in aviation related business.  There would be fuel for the Tupperware  club if there was a charter operator – maybe even a Ginger Beer; there would be ‘facilities’ at remote aerodromes if there was a RPT service; hell, there may even be a local aero club if someone thought there was a living to be made at a rural destination. None of the loud, aggressive ‘private’ groups provide these incentives – they just whine and snivel because those facilities ain’t there. Make me sick. Small children screaming because the ice-cream man ain’t there. Wake up, smell the fire – GA (big, professional end) is burning.

I say: a ducking air show in some misbegotten, bindii infested paddock may well thrill some rubbernecking Looky loo’s and bring in a few dollars for them what runs it. But will any of those toddle off and start the process for an AOC? Will any of the enthusiasts put a brick wall in front of CAO 48.1? How many of them have to live with the unbelievable Part 61 or even Part 135 ? I’ll tell you how many: none of ‘em.

This sort of behavior is not only counterproductive, but provides those who would dismiss ‘GA’ as a rag-tag, amateur lash up with much ammunition to support that case. “I fly for fun” Bully – if things get much worse for the non airline industry section, there won’t be much fun left in it.

Bloody amateurs; get real or shut up. If you can’t do that then please; have your Willy measuring competitions in private. There are those who are trying to preserve jobs and create new ones in a very difficult climate, while attracting the investment they need to grow.

GA is a bit more than a Tupperware jolly in good weather – a lot more. Lead – or follow; but FCOL stay out from under the real GA’s feet.

Yes; I’ve lost my rag about this – so what?

Toot – bloody Toot (FCOL).
Reply
Hitch in reply to Sandy - Rolleyes

(08-13-2017, 07:39 PM)kharon Wrote: E bloody nuff - already.

I find, I can live quiet happily with the ‘private’ end of GA tearing itself apart; the contribution to the ‘economy of scale’ just don’ t signify. Same as a golf club – or tennis club – even the local RSL – all tearing at each other with internal – highly personalised – “politics”. That’s their affair and of little interest to me.

But, when the financial or ego fuelled spats become a weapon for the ‘powers that be’ then; it is time to say something. These insignificant, small minded quarrels are like the kids playing up before lights out. One tolerates it – for a short while before the magic words – “if you don’t knock it off - I’m sending Mum up there”.

The ‘real-deal’ GA belongs to the AOC holders; those operating turbine aircraft, lifting heavy loads, doing charters and providing not only useful service, but employment and taxable revenue. It belongs to those who have vision and buy jet aircraft to meet a perceived market demand. GA belongs to those who build up flight schools, invest the house and the kids education in bringing that dream to a reality. The petty squabbles of minority groups cannot possibly be of any significance, whatsoever, in the great scheme of risk and investment in aviation related business.  There would be fuel for the Tupperware  club if there was a charter operator – maybe even a Ginger Beer; there would be ‘facilities’ at remote aerodromes if there was a RPT service; hell, there may even be a local aero club if someone thought there was a living to be made at a rural destination. None of the loud, aggressive ‘private’ groups provide these incentives – they just whine and snivel because those facilities ain’t there. Make me sick. Small children screaming because the ice-cream man ain’t there. Wake up, smell the fire – GA (big, professional end) is burning.

I say: a ducking air show in some misbegotten, bindii infested paddock may well thrill some rubbernecking Looky loo’s and bring in a few dollars for them what runs it. But will any of those toddle off and start the process for an AOC? Will any of the enthusiasts put a brick wall in front of CAO 48.1? How many of them have to live with the unbelievable Part 61 or even Part 135 ? I’ll tell you how many: none of ‘em.

This sort of behavior is not only counterproductive, but provides those who would dismiss ‘GA’ as a rag-tag, amateur lash up with much ammunition to support that case. “I fly for fun” Bully – if things get much worse for the non airline industry section, there won’t be much fun left in it.

Bloody amateurs; get real or shut up. If you can’t do that then please; have your Willy measuring competitions in private. There are those who are trying to preserve jobs and create new ones in a very difficult climate, while attracting the investment they need to grow.

GA is a bit more than a Tupperware jolly in good weather – a lot more. Lead – or follow; but FCOL stay out from under the real GA’s feet.

Yes; I’ve lost my rag about this – so what?

Toot – bloody Toot (FCOL).

Quote:Sandy Reith • 2 days ago

Hitch does well to provide us with the news of infighting and highlighting the issues that cause problems such as Narromine. Narrow and mine can be two words that sum up commercial battles in any field and this is why we have anti monopoly law in Australia.
But I take issue with Hitch on his question "how can we convince Canberra that our industry, our community, is worth saving " on his premise that Canberra is entitled to fiddle while GA burns owing to GA's lack of unity.

Hitch, with respect your take on this is wrong and plays directly into the hands of the Canberra cabal that is bent on preserving pre eminence, privilege, exceptional salaries, working conditions and Winter time excursions on all expenses paid junkets, points North.

One could easily understand from your stance, your common thread, that General Aviation only has to mature, and be of one voice, before we can expect any reforms that might slow or halt the disastrous decline of "our industry, our community ".

In other words you firmly, with shades of patronising, put blame and fault onto the collective of "our industry ".

This will not pass; this overlooks the scandalous lack of responsibility demonstrated by those whom we employ and pay, firstly the politicians, and secondly what used to be known as the public service. Those that we pay and expect through our democratic and civilised institutions to resolve the competing interests of individuals and groups of individuals with fairness. Governing efficiently allows freedom and prosperity.

GA is being tortured to death and in such a stressful environment its a wonder that there's not more internecine warfare.

Hitch, I could take you on an excursion around Australia and find hundreds or thousands of abandoned airstrips, closed refueling facilities and closed flying schools (Google Earth for abandoned airfields). Yes its good when we find voice together and a resurgent AOPA gives hope, but we are in a fight and to blame what's left of GA for the current impasse with a do nothing Minister is simply assisting the enemy.


SteveHitchen Mod Sandy Reith 11 hours ago

HI, Sandy. You haven't got this quite right. I don't believe that "General Aviation has only to mature, and be of one voice" before we can get genuine reform. This is a limiting statement that is not correct. We have a lot of work to do; a lot of lobbying, analysis, research, promotion, meetings and anything else you can think of that will get our industry going forward. However, none of that will achieve anything without maturity and unity, because the government won't believe the messages we are trying to send. It is not the only thing we need, but it is one of the foundation stones, and the rift over AirVenture has shown Canberra we aren't all pulling in the same direction. Consequently, who are they to believe is right?

And from a email chain:

Quote:General Aviation continues to crumble because there is an inbuilt self destruct mechanism that says all pilots, airplane owners and associations are self interested individuals and never should they get together to survive.
 
So it is divide and conquer from the regulatory authorities. QED.
 
Somehow there needs to be a unite conference with a plan and strategy for the good of aviation.
 
Aminta
Aminta Hennessy OAM


Sandy,

Well said!

Cheers,

Bill H.


MTF...P2 Wink
Reply
Hitch with good news on AirVenture, AOPA & AOPA Oz détente etc.

LMH via the Yaffa... Wink :

Quote:The Last Minute Hitch: 18 August 2017
18 August 2017
Steve Hitchen

AirVenture Australia looks set to go ahead as an event for the whole general aviation community. If this is the case, it's a great win for aviation after a week of what can best be described as blood-letting. With a funding disaster looming on the horizon, the organisers and the backing groups did the only thing they could reasonably do: settled down, went back to their own corners and re-focused getting AirVenture back on track. Thanks to a crowd-funding exercise from the SAAA, it looks like AirVenture is not only a goer, but perhaps even stronger than before. There are still a lot of signatures needed to get it over the line, and we will probably know more in the coming days, but you'd have to say it's looking good. What has come out of all of this most strongly is the signal that the general aviation community really wants a free-spirit national fly-in along the lines of Oshkosh in the USA.

CASA presented the Airvan 10 type certificate to Mahindra/GippsAero this week, marking only the second time a civil turbine-powered aircraft has been certified in Australia. This is a great achievement for the company, and elevates them to the status of serious player in the single-engine turbo-prop game. The path to success for the Airvan 10 won't be straight and narrow, however. Although the aeroplane is aimed at a niche market and theoretically not in competition with the Cessna Caravan and Quest Kodiak, the US manufacturers won't be happy with a more economical alternative eroding their market. GippsAero has already raised the hackles of their American counterparts by producing the Airvan 8 and have taken steps to protect their business, so there's a fair chance if the Airvan 10 starts to take hold over there that they'll react with matching ire. That won't worry GippsAero; that sort of reaction is an indicator you're doing something right.

Quote:"The impact of the letter itself on CASA is unlikely to be shattering.."

On a more friendly USA note, AOPA USA has entered the battle for medical reform in Australia by co-signing a letter to CASA with AOPA Australia laying out all the benefits the BasicMed system has brought to USA pilots. This is a great initative, and I was very pleased to read the letter, but not for the reasons you may think. The impact of the letter itself on CASA is unlikely to be shattering; I doubt there is anything in it that CASA doesn't already know. They will have been watching BasicMed closely and no doubt talking to the FAA about the reasoning behind the initiative, and AOPA USA, whilst powerful in the US, is not quite as influential in Australia. No, for me the real news in this letter is that it indicates a thawing in the often frosty relationship between AOPA and AOPA Australia that has a genesis dated over 15 years ago. Disputes over the use of the name and logo put distance between the two, but this letter shows an vast improvement in co-operation, which comes after a lot of hard work done behind the scenes by benefactors on both sides of the Pacific.

Congratulations to all the winners of the 2017 Wings Awards. It was another competitive field this year that gave the judges a few sleepless nights, knowing that there could be only one winner in each category. Those chosen surely are deserving people and groups that have worked hard for recognition. However, just because a nomination was not successful doesn't mean the candidate was not also deserving; it just highlights how difficult the judge's jobs are. So well done to the winners and the nominators. Personally, I hope the judging panel has the same tough job again next year; it shows how important the Wings Awards have become to general aviation.

By now you will have seen the September-October print issue of Australian Flying. If you haven't you know where to find it: at the nearest decent newsagent.We've got some really good stuff in there including an LSA flight test, the latest in aviation theory delivery, a feature on jump pilot training and the inside story on CASA's Stakeholder Engagement Group. I commissioned the latter feature because CASA seems at last to be walking the talk. Under previous administrations, phrases like "consultation" and "feedback" seemed to be nothing more than squares on a game of Buzzword Bingo, but now they seem to be far more concerned with what the industry thinks. The question that prompted the feature was "is what they're doing actually working?" The results are quite interesting. The issue cover shows a very pretty Ekolot Topaz in flight, which would not have been possible without pilots Stuart Hills and Murray Gerraty, who volunteered their time and skills to get the shot done. Thanks, guys.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...QBkdrCS.99
 
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Airventure update & division in the ranks - Undecided

LMH 25/8/17 via Oz Flying:

Quote:Steve Hitchen

On Tuesday night I addressed a class of aviation students at University of NSW. My subject was, as you could imagine, general aviation. Preparing for the lecture forced me to do a deep analysis of general aviation, all its woes, highlights, strengths and idiocyncracies. The hardest part was to present the material without bias in a manner that would either help these bright young people to one day contribute to the industry themselves, or send them off on quests querying my conclusions. Hopefully I did one of the other. But I got a lot out of the experience myself, and one of those things was a deeper understanding of why I love this general aviation caper. For all it's brickbats, it's an exciting industry to be in, and one that is worth the fight now and for decades to come. Some of those young students will have to take up the standard long after those who carry it now have had to relinquish the task.

Quote:we need to show the minister that we stand united and ready for the task

With less than one week until the Bureau of Infrastructure Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) is scheduled to present their GA Study to the minister, the last thing I wanted to find out is that there appears to be somewhat of a power struggle going on in Canberra. This has nothing to do with parliament or dual citizenship, but rather that factions within the GA community aren't getting on as well as we need them to. If the BITRE study brings forward anything that can give GA a genuine push towards revitalisation, then we need to show the minister that we stand united and ready for the task. He, and his department, will need to believe in us if they are to commit taxpayers' resources to help us out, but at the moment we seem to be showing them a divided community clamouring to be the favourite child. Darren Chester has signalled before that he has an issue with divided opinion, and it seems as we approach a critical crossroads we are offer him just that.

Right, that's it ... AirVenture Australia is going ahead. The announcement today that tickets are on sale from Monday is the Point-of-No-Return for the event, which will now go ahead despite the cloud that has hung over it for nearly a month now. All that is now supposedly sorted, although I suspect there is some residual politicking going on in the background. But largely, the success of AirVenture is now in the hands of the general public and the general, recreational and sport aviators of Australia. If we don't show up in force the event will fail; no amount of sponsorship money or stunning flying displays can possibly be used as measure to declare success without a good crowd turn-out. The whole controversy has scarred the event and left a nasty taste in the mouths of many of us, but it's time now to spit that out and remember why we want this event in the first place.

I am about to go on a bit of a sabbatical, although I doubt without me saying anything anyone would notice. For the month of September I will be handing over the print issue of Australian Flying for Senior Contributor Philip Smart to edit. Philip has been around the aviation industry for a few years and was most recently the editor of Aviation Business, so he's got both the cred and the skills to do a great job. I'll still be here doing the website and The Last Minute Hitch, which is why I suspect no-one will notice my sabbatical. I am going to use the time away from the print mag to explore some possibilities for the Australian Flying website, which have been on the backburner for so long the pot has almost boiled dry.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch


Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...VBxxQqe.99
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Seems like Hitch and Karon have their heads together on the "unite or expect little or nothing from government" concept. Both have patronisingly said "bang your heads together (H) or Mum will deal with you (K)."
These arguments suggest that sections General Aviation are to be dealt with like unruly children, in other words both gentlemen doff their lids to a greater power and expect the great power to pull these scallywags into line. K oversteps the mark by one huge leap further by denigrating private flying and its "amateurs".
Having operated RPT, charter and flying school I couldn't disagree more, most of us started in GA and without the private pilot, and all the activity and $billions that that generated, aviation in this country would be even poorer than where its heading today. Yes some didn't have to work as hard to get a start in the hard school of GA because a lucky few got Her Maj to pay multi $millions in fuel, equipment, maintenance and She even threw in accomodation. Maybe unconsciously this is where some people like to throw back to a greater power, the big Mum.
Besides to denigrate your fellow citizens who want simply to enjoy their flying and who will put up with the odd bindi in underwing sleeping bag is not right. Not to mention all those who need their aircraft in the bush just as Karon drives his car "privately".

K, mate, its a different world, we want better, we want reasonable, and we are not getting it. We should not have to pay $283 every 2 years for aviation ID, ridiculous AVMED, unworkable flying school and maintenance rules, etc.

Hitch doesn't spray on the private pilots but tells us that we must be all of one voice because the Minister has let on that he's more inclined to listen if all are good boys and girls singing from the same hymn sheet like the pacified angels he'd like us to be. Hitch tells us that when we are all together with the dear Minister there's so much work still to be done.

No there's not. Mate where have you been all these years? All the inquiries and recommendations have been made.

No more talk, no more inquiries or consultations, pussyfooting, obscurantist mumbo jumbo or bureaucratic double speak.

The Parliament has to act, like the US where Congress required the FAA to cause sensible reform of their AVMED rules. Independent instructors and car driver medicals first off the block.
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Hitch fired up in this week's LMH - Confused

This week's Oz Flying weekly wrap from Hitch is IMO one of the most significant posts that he has written and in the process he has gazumped us for seeing the GA kick in the guts contained within the CASA released Part 139 NPRM - again well done that man! Wink

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 1 September 2017
1 September 2017

CASA's aerodrome NPRM has a couple of barbs for general aviation, hidden quite well amongst the foliage of official language in which the paper is written. Firstly is the new definitions of airports as "regulated" or "unregulated": they are to be defined by whether or not they have instrument procedures. So if I get this right, if an aerodrome has instrument procedures it must be in the regulated category, and if the operator prefers to stay unregulated, then they have to surrender any IFR approaches relating to their airport. This reflects the decision taken by CASA several years ago that removed RNAVs from private airports. Around 30 airports in the country lost their RNAVs because CASA considered it unsafe, deciding instead it was safer for IFR pilots to make their own way home as best they could. It was a bewildering decision then, and even more bewildering now they have enshrined that attitude in their latest NPRM. How can it be safer to deny a technology that was designed to make the approach safe? Their arguments held little validity then, and the years have not vindicated their position.

Quote: this happens too often to be tempered by denials and soothing statements ...

The second issue I have with the paper are the people who wrote it. A project team from the Standards Consultative Committee is behind the paper; a team made up of representatives of major airports, the Australian Airports Association (AAA), Airservices, CASA, the department, some industry specialists and believe it or not, the Gliding Federation of Australia. Not a mention of anyone from Bankstown, Moorabbin, Jandakot or any other capital city or regional GA airport. An argument that the AAA represents their interests raises queries about why the major airports get independent representation. Are they not AAA members too? The lack of respect for the opinions and expertise of general aviation people shown by Canberra is again thrust into the spotlight, and this happens too often to be tempered by denials and soothing statements of being valued. They aren't close to being any form of consolation.

BITRE's much anticipated GA Study report is still in the works. Due no later that yesterday, I suppose it is now officially overdue. Even when it does come, it's first port of call will be the General Aviation Advisory Group, which will sit down and comb through it before handing the final version to Minister Darren Chester. What the minister does with it then is what we, the general aviation community, are really keen to find out. But we could be waiting a while. The minister still has to decide not only what the report says in real terms, but also what his government, if anything, is going to do about it. That is going to mean one of two things: taking the time to devise a committed action plan for general aviation, or constructing a response justifying why they are going to do nothing. Meanwhile, we who look hopefully up to the ivory tower have to wait to see if our pleas have been heard.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...T4Hdzsy.99
 
Wink Wink - Hmm.. and believe it or not even Sandy pays Hitch a compliment... Rolleyes
Quote:Sandy Reith • 15 hours ago

Hitch really on the money and with very good reason to be bewildered. They promulgated an NDB approach to my private and non registered airport due to my own operations and regular IFR charter inbound traffic. What was wrong with that?

Reality is that CASA is not interested in safety, the whole shooting match is merely to water the bureaucratic money tree and fireproof the Minister.

At a nearby regional airport, a senior instructor having paid $8000 upfront for a flying school operator application, was told to consider if the planned office wall placement of the still not granted Air Operator Certificate (AOC) was appropriate. This was apparently another big negative sufficient to further delay the grant of the AOC. The AOC still nowhere in sight after 18 months. I appraised CASA Chairman Jeff Boyd of this scandalous rip off last year, he informed me that CASA has a standard manual for this and it should be ok! Well Jeff it isn't ok.

No such mad paper war or huge rip off fee gouging in the US, a senior instructor is qualified and can teach anywhere straight up.

BITRE and it's General Aviation (GA) activity (decline) report.

Very funny, as if they don't know with all the history of the last 30 years, fuel sales, flying school numbers, active pilot numbers, instructor numbers, GA fleet utilisation, second hand aircraft values (collapsed), maintenance organisations including engine, propeller, radio, paint and apprentices, Designated Medical Examiners, ALL DOWN. And not just a little, GA is a disaster area.
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Hitch on FAR23 rewrite; Murky's strange departure & that BITRE GA report - Confused

LMH via the Yaffa:

Quote:
The Last Minute Hitch: 8 September 2017
8 September 2017
Comments 1 Comment


– Steve Hitchen
You could be mistaken for thinking the 
updates to FAR 23 are just the usual bureaucratic reforms that re-number paragraphs and delete bits that have been moved to other legislation, but in this case, the new FAR 23 is a real reform that has the potential to break shackles for the aviation industry. How bad was FAR 23? It was created from CAR 5, which goes back to 1966, and re-written in 1984 to make it more stringent, then over 800 amendments were made, each one representing another turn of the screw that tightened the regulations. In the end, FAR 23 basically disallowed innovation, like composite materials. All those new aeroplanes like the [b]Cirrus[/b] range and the Cessna TTx all fly under exemptions. GAMA's [b]Greg Bowles[/b] said to me in an interview a couple of years ago "We actually sort of destroyed the ability to make new product at the light end that are good, modern designs. The global regulatory regime is going to drive us into oblivion if we don't do something major."

Quote:The composite Cirrus SR22 is the world's best-selling single-engine aeroplane for a good reason.

[size=undefined]
That "something major" was a complete consensus re-write of FAR 23 that gives designers freedom to innovate and makes it much cheaper to get type certificates. With the chains loosened, we may now be facing the end of the line for traditional four-seaters like the C172 and the PA28. These planes, both born in the CAR 3 days, are old designs that have been constantly updated to keep them quasi-modern, but with better aerodynamic shapes available from composites, both [b]Cessna[/b] and [b]Piper[/b] must be considering their futures. The composite Cirrus SR22 is the world's best-selling single-engine aeroplane for a good reason.

Mike Mrdak's
departure from Infrastructure was announced this week in one of the most curious ways I have ever seen. b]Minister Darren Chester[/b] issued a statement that started out heaping praise on Mrdak and outlining his achievements, without actually saying at anytime that he's leaving the department. It leaves the industry to assume that from references to "his future role". It's not until the fourth paragraph that we start to understand that he will be the new Secretary for the Department of Communications and the Arts. The initial announcement came from the Prime Minister's office, but if you were on the ball, that could be easily missed. Similarly, the statement also never says that [b]Dr Steven Kennedy[/b] is to be the new secretary in infrastructure, only that Minister Chester is looking forward to working with him. It leaves you to read between the lines a bit.

And now from the jungle drums: it would appear the BITRE GA Study is turning out to be a bit of a hand grenade for the government, although I am sure they would be loathe to characterise it that way. If what I am told is true, it vindicates what the aviation community has been trumpting for years: we have a lot of potential, but we need help to convert that into something kinetic. How the government chooses to deal with the report is still a mystery, but there is some talk around the traps that real reform could be on the way. Have I said that before ... maybe just after the Forsyth Report came out?

And it seems that things have stabilised at Airventure and we are going to get a national fly-in and air show for the entire general aviation community. The line-up of exhibitors is now very healthy including some of the companies that became estranged by the exclusivity deal. Good to see them back on board. At all comes together in [b]Narromine[/b] on 19-21 October.

At last some more glassware for [b]Matt Hall's[/b] trophy cabinet! His 
third place at [b]Porto[/b] last Sunday was reward for a lot of heartache and sweat from the entire team this year as they battled to fine tune a new race plane. Hall predicted a podium at least before the end of the season as he and the team started to get the [b]Edge[/b] on song. He's done that, but with two races left to go, Hall still has the ability to stand on the top step of the podium for at least one of them. It's going to be a ripper finish to the [b]Red Bull Air Race[/b] season this year, and Hall might surprise a couple of contender before it's all over.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch
– edited at 5.00 pm 8/9/17 to correct a mistake
[/size]


Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...SAgL0lP.99

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LMH - 15/09/17: Bob Tait worthy HOF inductee; CASA VFR ADS-B DP; & BOM changes... Rolleyes   

Quote:Steve Hitchen

AAHOF has announced their 2017 inductees, and it was very pleasing to see one name in particular amongst the litany of worthies: Bob Tait. Bob has been guiding the careers of fledgling pilots for decades, and there are many CPLs and ATPLs who have spent many evenings hunched over Bob Tait books drinking in the material that will ultimately get them past another theory test. Bob is Australia's aviation theory guru, and his impact on all sectors of aviation has been unmeasurable and long-lasting. Bob Tait did not make spectacular pioneering flights, nor is he a household name with Australia's general public, but his contribution to the industry has been to enable many pilots to go on to aviation careers with confidence. Well deserved, and well done to AAHOF for selecting Bob to be inducted.

Quote:the word 'mandate' still scares a lot of people

It seems the VFR ADS-B project is not dead in the water as many in the GA community were beginning to think it was. After being proposed in June last year, the concept lost its champion when Mark Skidmore departed CASA. Consequently, there were some who presumed it had sunk to the bottom of the regulatory swamp. Not so, it seems, with CASA getting close to releasing a discussion paper. However, the DP looks set to be a controversy generator when it arrives because it is inevitably stained with the term "ADS-B", which is still regarded as a four-letter word in some GA circles. But are the detractors set against the idea simply because of a lack of communication? Firstly the word "mandate" still scares a lot of people, even though it has never been used in the context of VFR ADS-B; the phrase in all the briefing papers is "voluntary fitment". Still, ADS-B is mandatory for VFR in the USA, and Australia's sceptics are afraid of a cross-Pacific infiltration of ideas that will see CASA jump on board and issue a mandate. The DP, when it does come out, should put the kibosh on that idea; CASA has made no sounds in that direction at all. Secondly, we are talking about a low-cost, non-TSO version of the equipment that stands to give great functionality at a reasonable price. If the project doesn't deliver both of these things, it will have failed in its intent.

We are on the brink of a revolution in aviation weather forecasts with the traditional Area Forecast (ARFOR) set to be retired on 9 November. From that date on, the new Graphical Area Forecast (GAF) and Grid Point Wind and Temperature (GPWT) will be the channels via which we get our weather. The changes, according to the Bureau of Meteorology, are to align us with best practice and present more information in a more easily understood manner. We'll all have to get used to new forecast areas (10 instead of the current 28), six-hour forecasts instead of 12 and reading the GPWT charts. There will be some learning challenges here, but the new layouts do look easier to read than trying to decipher the coded heiroglyphics of the current ARFOR system. Look out for a comprehensive feature article on GAFs in the next issue of Australian Flying, which will arrive in your hands a couple of weeks before the GAFs go from concept to reality and ARFORs are gone forever.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...lufqw3e.99
Hmm...wonder why Hitch neglected to mention this report from earlier in the week?
Quote:[Image: Royal_Pines.jpg]The RACV's Royal Pines Resort on the Gold Coast, venue for next month's RAAA convention. (RACV)

Key Industry Figures to speak at RAAA Convention
14 September 2017

Some of the most influential people in the aviation industry are scheduled to speak at the Regional Aviation Assocation of Australia (RAAA) convention on the Gold Coast next month.

The annual convention, to be held this year at Royal Pines 25-27 October, attracts industry leaders, airline and airport operators, manufacturers and suppliers, which in turn generally guarantees a strong raft of speakers. Key figures to speak this year include:
  • Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester
  • CASA Stakeholder Engagement Manager Rob Walker
  • Airservices CEO Jason Harfield
  • ATSB Chief Commissioner Greg Hood and Aviation Commissioner Chris Manning
  • CEO of Bankstown and Camden Airports Lee de Winton
  • SQN LDR Samantha Freebairn RAAF
  • Hawker Pacific Vice President, RAAA Convention Chairman and Chairman of the Australian Aviation Hall of Fame Steve Padgett
  • RAAA Chairman Jim Davis.
In addition, V-8 Supercar racer Scott McLaughlin and around-the-world sailor Jessica Watson OAM are programmed to appear at lunchtime on the Friday.

The convention will also feature two workshops late on the Thursday: Flight Training Organisation Liability, and Airlines Engineering Training, and several other sessions delivered by subject experts and academics.

The RAAA convention is open to both members and non-members, and has significant support from the aviation industry, with sponsorship coming from airlines, insurance companies, government agencies, aircraft manufacturers, media outlets and a variety of commercial companies.

More information on the RAAA convention is on the RAAA website.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...yFCB8b6.99
...Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester...CASA Stakeholder Engagement Manager Rob Walker...Airservices CEO Jason Harfield...ATSB Chief Commissioner Greg Hood and...

I do wonder what in the world this mob could possibly have to say of value to the RAAA that wasn't already mentioned here at the WOFTAM (GA slap down) ASAP meeting: 
Quote:Whose the King of the castle?

 Intercepted the following tweet from M&M's dept yesterday (Ps Note who is at the head of the table - [Image: dodgy.gif]):
Quote: Wrote:@infra_regional attend the Aviation Strategic Leaders Forum together with leading industry bodies to discuss future of the aviation industry

[Image: DIR2A_2UIAAh23-.jpg]
 Probably more notable is who is not at that table? For example I note (just nod now -  [Image: biggrin.gif] ) 6D Noddy Chester is there but where is Big Ears... [Image: huh.gif]

H'mm I wonder if they're discussing how best to gloss over the soon to be released GA BITRE stats... Rolleyes


Hmm...isn't the main purpose of the RAAA convention to provide an opportunity for members and industry stakeholders to rub shoulders with the likes of the miniscule and his minions? Undecided   


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LMH 22 Sept 2017 - Wink :

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 22 September 2017


Steve Hitchen

Aircraft manufacturers today talk a lot about niche marketing; making an aeroplane to fill a specific role to carve market share away from other airframes that don't do that job quite as well. Back in the late 1950s, the Pilatus PC-6 Porter went one better: it created its own niche.Until then, the aviation world really didn't know what could be done with a single turbo-prop engine mounted in the nose of a high-wing aeroplane. The Porter would go on to a career of getting into landing strips other aeroplanes couldn't, of delivering daily supplies, relief material and cargo to isolated communites high in the Andes, the Himalaya, the Owen Stanleys and even on the flatest plains of Africa. It operated as an ambulance, air taxi, freighter, general carrier, and was particularly suited to parachute ops. The Porter really was the great connector. The PC-6 served also in the defence forces and law enforcement agencies of 30 countries, including Australia. With Pilatus ceasing production from 2019, the daddy of all turbine off-airport aircraft will disappear from the list of new-build options, but it will still be seen around the ragged airstrips of the world for many years yet.

Quote:"Russell is not the sort of person to be fooled by slight of hand"

There is a unique optimism drifting around the chambers of Canberra at the moment; unique because it seems to be shared by nearly all associations and lobby groups that have been badgering away to get reform thrust through. Even some of those that have been pillars of pessimism seem to have smiles cracking at the corners of their mouths. Regardless of how many times morale has risen to be belted down again by apathy in the capital, it was always a tug-of-war between the sceptics and the optimists as to the state of the industry. It seems that two meetings held this month are driving the sunny dispositions of lobbyists, both of which were rated progressive, constructive and having a "good vibe". But is this really the dawn of a new attitude within CASA, or is Shane Carmody just a very good illusionist? Like CEOs before him, Carmody has promised a sunset on the reform program and told the industry how important consultation is. Doing this has become a pitard that has seen more than one CEO hoisted on in the past, and the persistent failure to deliver on promises is largely to blame for industry disengagement en masse. Things are a-changing according to TAAAF Chairman Greg Russell, and that is an opinion to take with a tonne of salt, because Russell is not the sort of person to be fooled by slight of hand. Although I am not yet ready to herald the beginning of the revolution, this is encouraging.

But I am not a disciple of the theory that general aviation's malaise is all CASA's fault. There are other viruses infecting us as well, and one of those is a lack of young people walking through flying school doors. You have only to look at group pics of fly-aways and aero clubs and it is immediately apparent that most, if not all, of the people are over 40 or even higher. It's a real issue for the industry, and its good to see that AOPA Australia, courtesy of Dick Smith, has put together some initiatives to get young people excited about aviation. AOPA's tour bus is a big undertaking, but is exactly the sort of innovation we need to bring aviation to the youth of Australia. When they go to air shows, they are no doubt very keen on watching the aeroplanes in front of them, but this bus will give them the chance to actually do something; to participate and be a part rather than just sit on the airside fence and wish they could play too. But I worry for this. Yes, DS did provide start-up capital, but a coach of this type costs money to keep on the road, and if it is to perform the function for which it was conceived, it needs to be plying the highways and freeways, not parked behind the AOPA hangar at Bankstown. It is going to need a lot of support from the entire aviation industry to keep it rolling and viable.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...x4ErgoT.99
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(09-22-2017, 03:33 PM)Peetwo Wrote: LMH 22 Sept 2017 - Wink :

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 22 September 2017


Steve Hitchen

Aircraft manufacturers today talk a lot about niche marketing; making an aeroplane to fill a specific role to carve market share away from other airframes that don't do that job quite as well. Back in the late 1950s, the Pilatus PC-6 Porter went one better: it created its own niche.Until then, the aviation world really didn't know what could be done with a single turbo-prop engine mounted in the nose of a high-wing aeroplane. The Porter would go on to a career of getting into landing strips other aeroplanes couldn't, of delivering daily supplies, relief material and cargo to isolated communites high in the Andes, the Himalaya, the Owen Stanleys and even on the flatest plains of Africa. It operated as an ambulance, air taxi, freighter, general carrier, and was particularly suited to parachute ops. The Porter really was the great connector. The PC-6 served also in the defence forces and law enforcement agencies of 30 countries, including Australia. With Pilatus ceasing production from 2019, the daddy of all turbine off-airport aircraft will disappear from the list of new-build options, but it will still be seen around the ragged airstrips of the world for many years yet.

Quote:"Russell is not the sort of person to be fooled by slight of hand"

There is a unique optimism drifting around the chambers of Canberra at the moment; unique because it seems to be shared by nearly all associations and lobby groups that have been badgering away to get reform thrust through. Even some of those that have been pillars of pessimism seem to have smiles cracking at the corners of their mouths. Regardless of how many times morale has risen to be belted down again by apathy in the capital, it was always a tug-of-war between the sceptics and the optimists as to the state of the industry. It seems that two meetings held this month are driving the sunny dispositions of lobbyists, both of which were rated progressive, constructive and having a "good vibe". But is this really the dawn of a new attitude within CASA, or is Shane Carmody just a very good illusionist? Like CEOs before him, Carmody has promised a sunset on the reform program and told the industry how important consultation is. Doing this has become a pitard that has seen more than one CEO hoisted on in the past, and the persistent failure to deliver on promises is largely to blame for industry disengagement en masse. Things are a-changing according to TAAAF Chairman Greg Russell, and that is an opinion to take with a tonne of salt, because Russell is not the sort of person to be fooled by slight of hand. Although I am not yet ready to herald the beginning of the revolution, this is encouraging.


Quote:[Image: TAAAF_image_composite.jpg]The Australian Aviation Associations Forum (TAAAF) presents a united industry view to Canberra under the guidance of Honorary Chairman Greg Russell. (composite image)

ASAP the best Chance for Reform yet: Russell
22 September 2017

Greg Russell, Honorary Chairman of The Australian Aviation Associations Forum (TAAAF) has labeled CASA's new advisory panel as the best chance yet for aviation reform.

Speaking after the first Aviation Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) meeting on 4 September, and a TAAAF meeting held last week addressed by CASA CEO Shane Carmody, Russell told Australian Flying that he is optimistic that progess was being made.

"ASAP is a move in the right direction," he said. "I'm strongly supporting it and I think we've got the best chance we've had for a long time to make some real progess.

"I'm heartened by the fact that CASA has scrapped the 90-odd committees that were involved in consultation. Some of them were self-perpetuating and hadn't been properly managed in the past.

"The important difference with ASAP is that it will have the ability to refer matters to working groups and everything referred will have a deadline so they [the working groups] don't become self-perpetuating. ASAP will expect reports on how the working groups are progressing.

"What it will do is bring a level of discipline to the [reform] process that has been lacking in the past."

Russell cites a complete overhaul of CASA's stakeholder engagement as one of the reasons for the optimistic outlook, despite several historical failures by the regulator to sort out issues.

"I haven't seen a revamp like this in any of the earlier 'false dawns'," Russell said. "I think we've started the right way and it has real potential to deliver the goods."

CASA announced the new panel in June this year, which would be comprised of industry representatives from airlines and associations.

The primary function of ASAP was described as "the primary advisory body through which CASA will direct its engagement with industry and seek input on current and future regulatory and associated policy approaches."

However, some sectors of general aviation are not convinced of the value of ASAP, which Russell recognises.

"So many people are so bruised it's going to take a long time for them to realise that things are changing," he said. "It's time for the industry to stand up and support what's happening."

One of the primary concerns from the industry are the "false dawns" and a feeling that its all been said before but so little done. Russell believes one major point of difference is the new CEO.

"Shane Carmody has a better understanding of how the system works in Canberra and knows how a government-owned organisation operates.

"He's smart enough to realise the whole stakeholder area has been a problem for CASA for many years. To go to the trouble of setting up a consultative forum like this and not heed it's advice; I can't see him being that stupid to be perfectly honest."

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...VLQjXWF.99


But I am not a disciple of the theory that general aviation's malaise is all CASA's fault. There are other viruses infecting us as well, and one of those is a lack of young people walking through flying school doors. You have only to look at group pics of fly-aways and aero clubs and it is immediately apparent that most, if not all, of the people are over 40 or even higher. It's a real issue for the industry, and its good to see that AOPA Australia, courtesy of Dick Smith, has put together some initiatives to get young people excited about aviation. AOPA's tour bus is a big undertaking, but is exactly the sort of innovation we need to bring aviation to the youth of Australia. When they go to air shows, they are no doubt very keen on watching the aeroplanes in front of them, but this bus will give them the chance to actually do something; to participate and be a part rather than just sit on the airside fence and wish they could play too. But I worry for this. Yes, DS did provide start-up capital, but a coach of this type costs money to keep on the road, and if it is to perform the function for which it was conceived, it needs to be plying the highways and freeways, not parked behind the AOPA hangar at Bankstown. It is going to need a lot of support from the entire aviation industry to keep it rolling and viable.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...x4ErgoT.99

Latest regulatory wrangling: Courtesy Hitch today - Wink

Quote:[Image: Glengarry.jpg]Australia has hundreds of airfields that are not marked on aeronautical charts. (Steve Hitchen)

Frequency Responses support Multicom: Report
26 September 2017

A report analysing responses to CASA's low-level frequency discussion paper (DP) has indicated that most of the submissions to the DP supported using Multicom 126.7 in the vicinity of airstrips not marked on aeronautical charts.

CASA released DP1610AS in February this year to collect feedback on whether or not radio calls at non-controlled, non-CTAF airstrips should be made on Multicom or the Area VHF frequency.

According to the report's compilers, business consultancy Nous Group, submissions favoured the Multicom.

"Over half of all responses and submissions expressed exclusive support for MULTICOM," the report states. "Though there were detailed arguments to retain the current practice of monitoring and broadcasting on Area VHF, including submissions from two Commonwealth Government agencies responsible for aviation safety, there was broad criticism of its perceived limitations from detractors."

Of the 381 responses collected, 315 or 82% expressed support for using the Multicom, whereas only 44% opted for the Area VHF. Several respondents indicated either would be acceptable. Only 11% rejected the Multicom out-right, whereas 35% said the Area VHF was unacceptable.

"Accordingly, Nous’ analysis has found that the majority of respondents favour a return to the pre-2013 situation in which MULTICOM 126.7 MHz was used in the vicinity of an unmarked ALA, except in the vicinity of a discrete Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) or Broadcast Area Frequency," the report says.

However, those in favour of the Area VHF include CASA themselves, Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and Regional Express.

Most of the support for the Area VHF was based on access to air traffic control, whilst criticism was about congestion and confusion. Supporters of the Multicom cited better coverage, established use and simplicity, but Multicom also drew criticism over congestion.

CASA has said it expects to create a policy on the issue before the end of October 2017.
"We will consider the impacts of any proposed changes on the overall air traffic management system, to ensure that any changes address future needs of all airspace users and are considered as part of an enhanced and improved airspace design," CASA said in releasing the report.

The full Nous Group report and some submissions are on the CASA website.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...0ol61fd.99


MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
Long on rhetoric; short on action.

CASA – “On 4 September 2017 we took another a key step in re-setting the way CASA consults and engages with the aviation community. That was the date of the first meeting of the new Aviation Safety Advisory Panel, which has been set up to provide me with informed and objective high-level advice on current, emerging and potential issues and the way CASA performs its functions.”

"I haven't seen a revamp like this in any of the earlier 'false dawns'," Russell said. "I think we've started the right way and it has real potential to deliver the goods."

AIPA – “Australian and International Pilots Association vice-president Shane Loney said he understood why there was a delay but was “disappointed this is still going on”.


“We’re disappointed at how slow it is,” he said.” (Amen to that).


Reality fix.....
[Image: DKuKamYW0AEyXoE.jpg]

Before the CASA tram can be put back into service, there is a lot of work to. The top dogs will come and look at the wreckage, shake their heads, tut-tut and go back to HQ, where they will discuss their exposure first, the PR angle second, who to blame third and finally after looking at the insurance, decide the cheapest way to extricate themselves, finally call in those who may know how to return to service and tell ‘em to report back on ways and means first.

The engineers, town council wallah’s and the company second tier management will then visit, wearing Hi-viz and hard hats; tut-tut, shake their heads then scuttle back to the office to draft reports, flavoured with their own agenda, seasoned with obfuscation and larded with self defence.

The poor old driver will get crucified; the insurers will duck as much expense as they can and the whole show will drag on for a fortnight. Meanwhile the road is blocked, people are late for work, a business is closed and generally, life is made miserable for those really affected by the wreckage.

It is very well to talk the talk. But ask the man in the street what he wants – “I want this bleeding hulk removed from my front door, the mess cleaned up and I want to be able to get to work – now would be good”.

This is, despite the rhetoric, exactly what Carmody has to deal with; a wreck and a serious problem. No amount of chat will remove it, someone has to roll up their sleeves, get some machinery in there and start moving stuff. This wreck has been parked there for 30 long, weary, expensive, inconvenient, gab filled years.

Time to stop gabbing and start the heavy lifting.

Toot - toot.
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