Accidents - Domestic
(11-22-2017, 09:01 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Virgin bends yet another ATR -Confused

Not sure how they kept a lid on this but I just happened to notice that the ATSB are investigating another Virgin ATR occurrence that is being categorised as an 'accident':
Quote:Aviation safety investigations & reports
Investigation title
Hard landing involving GIE Avions de Transport Regional ATR72, VH-FVZ, Canberra Airport, ACT, on 19 November 2017
 
Investigation number: AO-2017-111
Investigation status: Active
 
[Image: progress_0.png] Summary

The ATSB is investigating a hard landing involving a GIE Avions de Transport Regional ATR72, VH-FVZ, at Canberra Airport, Australian Capital Territory, on 19 November 2017.
During approach to runway 35, the aircraft encountered windshear. The aircraft landed hard, and the tail skid and underside of the rear fuselage contacted the runway. The aircraft sustained substantial damage. There were no reported injuries.

As part of the investigation, the ATSB has inspected the aircraft and obtained the flight data recorders, will interview the flight crew and gather additional information.
A final investigation report will be released following the conclusion of the ATSB’s investigation.

Quote:General details

Date: 19 November 2017
 
Investigation status: Active
 
Time: 13:26 ESuT
 
Investigation type: Occurrence Investigation
 
Location   (show map): Canberra Airport
 
Occurrence type: Hard landing
 
State: Australian Capital Territory
 
Occurrence class: Operational
 
Occurrence category: Accident
 
Report status: Pending
 
Highest injury level: None
 
Expected completion: March 2018

Aircraft details

Aircraft manufacturer: ATR-Gie Avions de Transport Régional
 
Aircraft model: ATR72-212A
 
Aircraft registration: VH-FVZ
 
Serial number: 1087
 
Operator: Virgin Australia Airlines
 
Type of operation: Air Transport High Capacity
 
Sector: Turboprop
 
Damage to aircraft: Substantial
 
Departure point: Sydney, NSW

Destination: Canberra, ACT

Under the TSI Act 2003 the ATSB define an accident as:

Quote:accident means an investigable matter involving a transport vehicle where:
                     (a)  a person dies or suffers serious injury as a result of an occurrence associated with the operation of the vehicle; or
                     (b)  the vehicle is destroyed or seriously damaged as a result of an occurrence associated with the operation of the vehicle; or
                     ©  any property is destroyed or seriously damaged as a result of an occurrence associated with the operation of the vehicle.
Therefore the fact that this 'accident' was not reported by the MSM would suggest that there was no politican onboard and the pax were way too busy extracting their shorts from their asses while praying to God that they were still alive to bother reporting the incident to the MSM - Big Grin

MTF? Yeah probably in about 2030 in the ATSB Annual report...P2 Dodgy

SMH catching up... Wink

Quote:Watchdog investigates Canberra airport landing that damaged plane

[Image: 1503283205805.jpg]
Australia's transport safety watchdog is investigating after a plane was badly damaged during a hard landing at Canberra Airport on Sunday.

The Virgin plane encountered windshear and hit the runaway as it was flying in from Sydney, according to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

"The aircraft landed hard, and the tail skid and underside of the rear fuselage contacted the runway," an initial investigation brief said.

The plane sustained "substantial damage" as a result but no injuries were reported.
It is the first time in at least a decade that the watchdog has investigated an incident involving windshear at Canberra Airport.

A Virgin Australia spokeswoman said the airline was working with the safety bureau on its investigation.

"The safety of our guests, crew and aircraft is our highest priority," she said.

Safety bureau investigators have since inspected the aircraft and seized the flight data recorders. They will also interview the plane's flight crew.

The watchdog investigates incidents where there is potential to improve procedures and policies around public safety.

"If there is no obvious public safety benefit to investigating an accident, the ATSB is less likely to conduct a complex, resource-intensive investigation," a safety bureau spokesman said.

In the past decade, there have been 85 windshear, microburst or turbulence incidents at or near Canberra Airport, 23 of which involved windshear.

Last year, there were more than 17,000 transport incidents across Australia reported to the bureau - about 46 a day on average.

More than 5000 of those were aviation-related and the bureau completed 39 investigations into air transport as a result.

The investigation into Sunday's incident is expected to be completed by March.

With Tom McIlroy
Reply
"In the past decade, there have been 85 windshear, microburst or turbulence incidents at or near Canberra Airport, 23 of which involved windshear."

Yup and expect a few more. Uncontrolled development around airports tends to cause that.

Wonder when a 737 is going to pay an unexpected visit to Toys are Us?
Reply
ATSB release prelim reports for two fatal Cessna accidents - Angel

Via the ATSB website:

Quote:Preliminary report
Published: 8 December 2017

On 28 October 2017, a Cessna Aircraft Company T310R, registered VH-JMW, was being operated on a private flight from Toowoomba, Queensland to The Lakes aerodrome, New South Wales. The aircraft had been flown from The Lakes to Toowoomba earlier that day.

The aircraft departed Toowoomba at 1434 Eastern Daylight-saving Time (EDT)[1]. The pilot was the owner of the aircraft and there was a passenger in the other front seat.

During the flight, transponders in the aircraft provided flight information indicating that the aircraft flew at 9,500 ft in the cruise. Weather forecasts and observations indicated good weather conditions throughout the flight, with a light easterly wind in the vicinity of the destination.

About half a nautical mile north of The Lakes aerodrome, witnesses driving south on the Pacific Highway observed the aircraft flying just to the west of the highway at low altitude in a southerly direction. The landing gear was extended and the aircraft was descending slowly. The aircraft was then observed to roll left and descend rapidly.

The aircraft collided with terrain at approximately 1555, in a narrow wooded strip of land east of the Pacific Highway, between the highway and the main northern railway line. The accident was 800 m from The Lakes runway 16 threshold, in line with the runway direction (Figure 1). The pilot and passenger were fatally injured.

Figure 1: Flight path approaching The Lakes. Radar data was lost below 900 ft altitude

[Image: ao2017105_figure-1.jpg?width=463]
Source: Google Earth modified by ATSB

Aircraft information
VH-JMW was a Cessna T310R, six seat, twin-engine aircraft, powered by two Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-520-NB turbocharged engines (Figure 2). It had six fuel tanks, comprising the main fuel tanks in the wingtip pods, and two auxiliary fuel tanks in each wing.

Figure 2: Cessna T310R VH-JMW
[Image: ao2017105_figure-3.jpg?width=463]
Source: flightaware.com

Wreckage examination
On-site examination of the wreckage, surrounding markings on trees and the ground indicated that the aircraft impacted terrain in a steep nose-down attitude and banked to the left. The aircraft was in a landing configuration.

The left wing had separated outboard of the left engine, and both the wing-tip pods had separated from the wings. The remaining fuel tanks were also breached and no fuel was found, however a smell of aviation fuel was noted by emergency responders at the accident site. There was no evidence of fire.

Examination of the engines and propellers indicated that the left engine was producing no power and the right engine was likely producing low power at the time of the accident.

A number of aircraft components, instruments and electronic devices were recovered from the accident site by the ATSB for further examination.

The aircraft was not equipped with a flight data recorder or a cockpit voice recorder, nor was it required to be.

Ongoing investigation
The investigation is continuing and will include consideration of the:
  • pilot’s qualifications, experience and medical information
  • fuel planning for the flight
  • component examination
  • witness information
  • weather information
  • recovered instruments and available electronic data.
 
___________
&..
Quote:Preliminary report
Published: 7 December 2017

Sequence of events
On 23 October 2017, two pilots from Air Frontier were operating a Cessna C210L aircraft, registered VH-HWY (HWY), on a charter flight from Darwin Airport to Elcho Island, Northern Territory. The pilot in the left seat was the pilot in command, under supervision of the right seat pilot and the flight was operating under the visual flight rules (VFR).[1]

The pilots had submitted a flight plan to track via ‘VFR route No. 2’ to Castle Point (Figure 1) and then direct to Elcho Island.

Figure 1: Darwin Airport and pertinent features on the visual terminal chart

[Image: ao2017102_figure-1.jpg?width=463]
Source: Airservices annotated by ATSB

The aircraft took off from runway 29 at about 1307 Central Standard Time.[2] Recorded air traffic control (ATC) data showed that as the aircraft climbed through 700 ft, the pilot[3] contacted ATC and was cleared to climb to 7,500 ft and turn onto a heading of 320° (items 1 and 2 in Figure 2). About 5 minutes later, the controller cleared the aircraft to turn right onto a heading of 100° (item 3 in Figure 2).

As the aircraft tracked east and passed through 6,100 ft on climb, the pilot requested clearance to divert 5 miles left or right of track due to weather (item 4 in Figure 2) and to climb to 9,500 ft. Air traffic control advised that left of track was unavailable due to the nearby active restricted airspace (Figure 1) and so was cleared to divert up to 5 NM right of track and to climb to 9,500 ft. Just over 2 minutes later, the controller cleared the aircraft to operate up to 10 NM right of track (item 6 on Figure 2).

At 1325, the aircraft turned north-east and continued to climb for another 4 minutes, to about 10,000 ft. At 1329, the controller recalled seeing the aircraft turn abruptly to the south west. The controller asked the pilot if they required alternate tracking (item 8 on Figure 2). The pilot replied ‘affirm’ and the controller cleared the aircraft to deviate up to 20 NM right of route. The aircraft continued to track south west.

Figure 2: Aircraft track with pertinent broadcasts from the aircraft and air traffic control

[Image: ao2017102_figure-2.jpg?width=463]
Source: RAAF radar data overlaid on Google earth, annotated by ATSB

At 1332, the aircraft’s recorded groundspeed increased from 130 kt to 150 kt. Air traffic control radar recorded the aircraft descending and climbing between 9,600 ft and 10,100 ft (see the section titled Recorded data). At 1332:20 while at 10,100 ft and a recorded groundspeed of 100 kt, the aircraft’s altitude (radar mode ‘C’) disappeared from the radar display (item 9 in Figure 2). The controllers immediately assessed the absence of this line as abnormal.

About 10 seconds later, three short transmissions were recorded, resulting from separate ‘push-to-talk’ activations, likely from the aircraft’s radio. At 1332:45, the aircraft’s altitude (mode C) briefly reappeared, recording the aircraft at 5,100 ft and 70 kt groundspeed, and 15 seconds later the controllers reported that the aircraft disappeared from the radar screen. The controllers attempted to make radio contact with the pilot, but were unsuccessful.

Witnesses in the vicinity of Howard Springs (Figure 1) saw the aircraft descend rapidly in a relatively flat attitude with a portion of each wing missing. The main fuselage was found less than 1 NM from the last recorded radar position and both aircraft wings were located about 700 m south-east of that site.

Both pilots were fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed.

Weather and environmental information
On the day of the occurrence, the environment was typical of the Northern Territory early wet season or ‘build‑up’, with unstable conditions, and showers and storms expected.

A thunderstorm to the north of Darwin, combined with the north-west sea breeze, triggered a convective cell to develop rapidly between 1300 and 1330 between Howard Springs and Koolpinyah (19 km to the north east). Based on the cloud top temperature, the top of the cell was around 6,000–7,000 ft at 1300, 9,000 ft at 1320, 13,000–14,000 ft at 1330, and around 14,000 ft at 1340. The developing cumulus clouds may have produced strong updrafts or downdrafts.

The air traffic controller and supervisor reported that their observations of the weather radar, using the Bureau of Meteorology internet website, indicated a cell (painted yellow, indicating rain) but not one that was indicative of a thunderstorm.

Witnesses reported seeing a large cumulus cell form over the Howard Springs area, which they described as a regular occurrence in the build-up season in Darwin. Some reported that the cloud went ‘very black’ at the time of the accident, and that starting about 10 minutes after the accident, it rained heavily for about an hour.

Recorded data
The aircraft was not equipped with a flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder, nor was it required to be.

The aircraft’s altitude and groundspeed were recorded by the Darwin ATC radar for the last 6 minutes of the flight (Figure 3).

The aircraft’s airspeed was not recorded. The forecast wind at 10,000 ft was 10 kt from 190°, so the aircraft’s airspeed may have been up to 10 kt higher than the recorded groundspeed in the last few minutes of the flight. However, the actual airspeed cannot be accurately determined, given the likelihood of wind shear and turbulence in the air mass.

Manoeuvring speed
The manoeuvring speed was specified by the aircraft’s manufacturer as 118 kt at the aircraft’s maximum take-off weight, shown as a dotted line in Figure 3. At airspeeds above the manoeuvring speed, control inputs or turbulence may produce wing loading that can damage the aircraft’s structure. At airspeeds above about 145 kt, this loading can result in failure of the aircraft structure.

The graph shows that shortly after the aircraft climbed to 10,000 ft, the aircraft’s groundspeed exceeded the manoeuvring speed. The groundspeed remained above the manoeuvring speed, increasing to a maximum of 150 kt in the final minute of the flight.
During the same timeframe, the aircraft’s recorded altitude varied between 9,700 ft and 10,000 ft, above the cleared altitude of 9,500 ft.

Figure 3: VH-HWY recorded altitude and groundspeed for the last 6 minutes of flight

[Image: ao2017102_figure-3.png?width=463]
Source: RAAF radar data analysed by ATSB

Aircraft information
The Cessna Aircraft Company 210L is a six-seat, high cantilever wing, single-engine aircraft equipped with retractable tricycle landing gear and was designed for general utility purposes. The aircraft was powered by a Teledyne Continental IO-550P engine.
HWY was manufactured in the United States in 1974 and was first registered in Australia in 1988. The aircraft was operated in the charter category.

In 2012 the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) published Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2012‑10-04 Wing main spar lower cap inspection. This AD was applicable to HWY and required an inspection of the left and right wing lower main spar caps for cracks. Aircraft technical documentation identified this AD was completed in June 2012 with no defects found. During scheduled maintenance completed in March 2016, the wing main spar carry through was replaced with a serviceable item due to corrosion. HWY was then operated by Air Frontier and maintained under an approved system of maintenance from March 2017.

A periodic inspection of the aircraft was completed on 26 September 2017 and a new maintenance release was issued, which was still current at the time of the occurrence. In addition, a scheduled 50 hourly inspection was completed on 23 October 2017. The maintenance release was current at the time of the occurrence and it was reported there were no concerns with aircraft serviceability prior to departure from Darwin Airport. In addition, the pilots did not advise ATC of any aircraft-related issues.

Wreckage and impact information
Examination of the aircraft wreckage indicated that the aircraft impacted terrain from a vertical descent, right side slightly down, in an almost level attitude. The wings were located about 24 m apart and about 740 m south-southeast of the fuselage, consistent with an in-flight breakup (Figure 4). There was no evidence of fire. Various aircraft components were located between the fuselage and an area about 70 m beyond the wings, over 810 m in total.

Figure 4: Google Earth images showing accident site and location of fuselage and wings

[Image: ao2017102_figure-4.jpg?width=463]
Source: Google Earth, modified by ATSB

Both wings had separated between 0.5 and 1.5 m outboard from the wing-to-fuselage attachment. The wing spars had fractured in over-stress, and exhibited bending deformation consistent with forces acting upwards and rearwards on the wings. Examination of the wings showed no evidence of pre-existing defects.

On-site examination of the severely impact-damaged fuselage (Figure 5), engine and propeller did not identify any pre‑existing faults or anomalies with the aircraft that could have contributed to the accident. However, a number of aircraft components were retained for further examination and testing. The propeller did not exhibit any evidence of rotation at impact, consistent with fuel exhaustion resulting from the ruptured integral wing-fuel tanks.

Figure 5: The fuselage, left and right wings

[Image: ao2017102_figure-5.jpg?width=463]
Source: Northern Territory Police and ATSB, modified by ATSB

Both pilots were secured in their seats prior to impact. Notwithstanding the severe disruption to the airframe, examination identified both pilot seats were about mid-travel with one locator pin on each seat still engaged in the seat rails.

Related occurrences
ATSB investigation AO-2011-160 involved a Cessna 210M aircraft, VH-WBZ, which broke up in flight. Although the precise circumstances were not known, a combination of aircraft airspeed with turbulence and/or control inputs generated stresses that exceeded the design limits of the aircraft structure.

The United States National Transportation Safety Board investigated seven in-flight breakups of Cessna 210 aircraft since 2000. All those occurrences involved flight into thunderstorms or associated turbulence, a loss of control following inadvertent flight into instrument meteorological conditions or a combination of both.

Continuing investigation
The investigation is continuing and will include examination of the following:
  • recovered components and available electronic data
  • aircraft and site survey data collected
  • further interviews with a number of witnesses and involved parties
  • weather conditions and its effect on the flight
  • pilot qualifications and experience
  • the aircraft’s maintenance and operational records
  • the operator’s training and professional development programs
  • previous research and similar occurrences.
__________



MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
Update - 18/12/17: Preliminary report released.  

(11-08-2017, 06:30 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Update to Hobart tragedy.

Via the ABC online news:
Quote:Hobart Airport crash: ATSB examining RotorLift helicopter incident which killed Roger Corbin


Updated 25 minutes ago Wed 8 Nov 2017, 6:54pm
[Image: 9130462-3x2-700x467.jpg] Photo: Emergency personnel near the wreckage of the RotorLift helicopter at Hobart Airport. (Supplied: Luke Bowden/The Mercury)

A 33-year-old pilot remains in a serious but stable condition at Royal Hobart Hospital as aviation authorities continue to investigate a helicopter crash at Hobart Airport that killed flight instructor Roger Corbin.
[Image: 9127940-3x2-340x227.jpg]

Photo: Roger Corbin had more than 35 years' experience in the aviation industry. (Supplied: RotorLift)


The airport resumed normal operations this morning following the crash yesterday afternoon near the runway.

Roger Paul Corbin, a 57-year-old flight instructor and owner of RotorLift Aviation, was killed and a male pilot was seriously injured.

The AS350BA Squirrel helicopter VH-BAA was on a training flight when it nosedived into the ground shortly before 5:30pm.

Inspector Natasha Freeman said it remains unclear which of the men was flying the aircraft.

"The circumstances surrounding the crash are being investigated, and at this point it is not possible to say who was in control of the dual control aircraft at the time," she said.

[Image: 9130070-3x2-340x227.jpg]

Photo: RotorLift helicopters were used for civilian, corporate and government purposes. (Facebook: RotorLift Aviation)


Inspector John Ward said the drop from a height of about 200 metres had a devastating effect.

"It appears to me it's pretty much broken in half, certainly been a write-off. It's come from 200 metres to the ground," he said.

The wreckage of the helicopter, which belongs to charter company RotorLift, has been taken to a secure area.

The crash was witnessed by many people at the terminal and four people, including two ground staff, gave statements.

Hobart Airport was shut down last night after the accident, disrupting the travel plans of hundreds of passengers.

Three inbound flights were diverted to Launceston and the passengers bussed to Hobart.

Three outgoing flights were cancelled. Airport operations returned to normal this morning.

The Australian Air Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) said it had sent two investigators to probe the cause of the crash:

Quote:"The ATSB is investigating the accident involving a AS350BA Squirrel helicopter, registered VH-BAA, that occurred at Hobart Airport, Tasmania on 7 November.
"The helicopter collided with terrain, fatally injuring one of the two persons on board.
"The ATSB deployed a team of two transport safety investigators to the accident site with expertise that includes aircraft operations, engineering and maintenance. While on site, the team will examine the wreckage, gather any recorded data, and interview witnesses."

The ATSB said it would release a preliminary investigation report "in approximately 30 days".

"A final report into the accident may take up to 12 months to complete. However, should a safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify those affected and seek safety action to address the issue."

Video: Crews respond after helicopter crash at Hobart airport (ABC News)

Via the ATSB: https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/inv...-2017-109/

Quote:Preliminary report

Published: 18 December 2017

At about 1635 Eastern Daylight‑saving Time[1] on 7 November 2017, a Eurocopter AS350BA (AS350) helicopter, registered VH-BAA, departed Hobart Airport, Tasmania for a local training area to the northeast. On board were a pilot and instructor and the flight was the third training flight of an AS350 helicopter-type endorsement for the pilot.

The endorsement training was conducted over a two-day period. It included ground school training, and three flights that formed the practical component of the training syllabus. One instructor had assessed the first two flights but, since the third focussed on emergency procedure training, the occurrence instructor elected to fly with the pilot.

The pilot held a Commercial Pilot (Helicopter) Licence and a valid Class 1 Aviation Medical Certificate. The pilot had experience flying other turbine helicopter types, on various types of operations. The pilot’s existing low-level and sling approvals, which were reportedly held on a foreign licence, were also to be assessed during the AS350 type endorsement.

Following arrival in the training area, the pilot’s general helicopter handling and low-level flight were assessed. At about 1715, the pilots reported to air traffic control that operations in the training area were complete and requested a clearance back into the Hobart Airport control zone, to conduct practice emergencies. The approach to the airport reportedly involved conducting a simulated hydraulic system failure to the helicopter training area X-Ray (Figure 1).

Training Area X-Ray was located adjacent to and west of the main runway and was familiar to the pilot, as this area was used in the previous day’s training.

Figure 1: Approximate flight path of the helicopter (not to scale), showing the approach to the X-Ray training area, where the helicopter slowed before making an abrupt left turn and impacting terrain.
[Image: ao2017109_figure-1.jpg?width=463]
Source: Airservices Australia, modified by ATSB

The instructor reportedly announced the simulated failure to the pilot just prior to commencing the approach. The pilot responded to the simulated failure by stabilising the helicopter and reducing the airspeed to about 60 kt, in accordance with the manufacturer’s hydraulic failure procedure detailed in the aircraft’s flight manual.

The flight manual emphasised that, without hydraulic assistance, the flight controls exhibited force feedback requiring the pilot to exert additional force on the controls to maintain 60 kt in level flight. The manual also stated that, after transitioning to the recommended safety speed range, the second phase of the hydraulic failure procedure was to transition to slow run‑on landing[2] (at around 10 kt) via a flat final approach in to the wind. The pilot reported that, as the helicopter decelerated and descended towards the landing area, they noted the additional control forces required.

A video camera installed at the airport recorded footage of the helicopter’s final approach. As the helicopter descended toward training area X-Ray, it initially appeared to be controlled and in a flatter than normal approach profile. The helicopter then appeared to slow into a high hover about 30 ft above the ground. Seconds later, it commenced an abrupt nose-down turn to the left and impacted the ground.

The training procedure section of the helicopter flight manual cautioned pilots to:
…not attempt to carry out hover flight or any low speed manoeuvre without hydraulic pressure assistance. The intensity and direction of the control feedback forces will change rapidly. This will result in excessive pilot workload, poor aircraft control, and possible loss of control.

The impact forces caused significant damage to the cockpit area, particularly the left pilot side (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Damage to the helicopter showing significant impact damage to the cockpit area and left landing skid tip, consistent with a left nose-down attitude on impact.

[Image: ao2017109_figure-2.jpg?width=463]
Source: ATSB

Seated on the left side, the instructor sustained fatal injuries, while the pilot seated on the right was seriously injured.

The investigation is continuing, and will analyse the evidence obtained during the on-site investigation phase. Additional work will include a review of the:
  • conduct of training operations
  • helicopter systems
  • any environmental influences that may have affected the operation of the helicopter at the time of the accident.


MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
VH-UDB preliminary report released.

Via ATSB website:

Quote:Preliminary report

Published: 19 December 2017

On 24 October 2017, the ATSB was advised that wreckage of an aircraft had been located 30 km north-west of Albany Airport, Western Australia. A search had been mounted following a call to emergency services to advise that an aircraft had been seen in a steep descent before it disappeared from sight. Soon afterwards, smoke was observed in the direction of where the aircraft was last seen.

The aircraft was identified as a Cessna 210B, registered VH-DBU, which was being operated by the owner-pilot on a private flight from Albany to Bunbury. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured.

Figure 1: Nominal intended flight path
[Image: ao2017103_figure-1.jpg?width=463]
Source: Google Earth

The ATSB commenced an investigation and deployed investigators to the accident site. Other than recordings of radio transmissions made in the Albany area, there was no additional recorded data available to provide information about the flight. As a result, the ATSB was reliant on the radio transmissions, witness information and aircraft wreckage to establish the sequence of events.

At Albany Airport, the pilot made routine transmissions to check his radio and on entering the runway to position for take-off. Then, at 1033 (Australian Western Standard Time – AWST), the pilot transmitted that he was airborne from runway 14, maintaining runway heading (to the south-east), intending to make a right turn at 1,500 (ft above mean seal level (AMSL)) to track to Bunbury and climb to 6,500 (AMSL). This was the last recorded radio transmission from the pilot.

People who observed the aircraft start, taxi, and take-off did not notice anything abnormal about the aircraft. From aerial photos of coastal scenery around Albany that the pilot sent to an acquaintance and a report from an Albany resident, it appears that the pilot undertook some local flying before departing the area. There were a few people between Albany and the accident site area that heard an aircraft that could have been VH-DBU, but there was insufficient information to establish the aircraft flight path.

The key witnesses were located between 3 km and 5 km from the accident site in the general direction of Albany. Some witnesses related that prior to any apparent problem with the aircraft, the noise from the aircraft was loud and the aircraft seemed to be lower than was usual (for aircraft operating in that area). For a couple of witnesses, the noise was indicative of an aircraft manoeuvring. In regard to weather, the witnesses reported some cloud but generally clear and calm conditions.

The first sign of a problem was a loud and distinctive noise that witnesses described as a sharp bang, crack of a whip, gunshot, and thunder/lightning. This was an alarming noise that some witnesses associated with the aircraft that had just been heard or seen and prompted them to try and identify it.

Only one of the witnesses, located about 4 km from the accident site, saw the aircraft following the sharp noise. That witness recalled the aircraft was in a nose-down vertical descent rotating to the right and the engine noise was rising and falling. The witness watched the aircraft until it disappeared from sight due terrain and trees. Nothing was seen by the witness to separate from the aircraft and no smoke or vapour was observed coming from the aircraft.

Other witnesses related that, following the initial sharp noise, there were a series of sounds over an extended period (about 10 to 15 seconds according to one witness) that were described as similar to angle grinding or crashing through trees. Other descriptions were chopping, whirring, striking, whining, and high-pitched. One of the witnesses also recalled the engine revving during this time. These irregular noises stopped suddenly, probably upon impact with the terrain.

Figure 2: Accident site location
[Image: ao2017103_figure-2.jpg?width=463]
Source: Google Earth

The aircraft wreckage was located in heavy/dense bushland within the Mount Lindesay National Park. ATSB investigators gained access to the accident site and located wreckage with the assistance of Western Australia Police and the Parks and Wildlife Service.

From the examination of the aircraft wreckage at the accident site, the ATSB makes the following observations:
  • the left wing (Figure 3), right wing, tailplane, and fuselage were not co-located, which is indicative of an in-flight break-up
  • most but not all of the aircraft parts have been identified and these were found within an area of about 700 m long and 250 m wide
  • the items furthest from the fuselage (main wreckage) were pieces of right wing skin and rear fuselage skin
  • the main wreckage, that included the engine and propeller, was severely affected by fire
  • many of the major parts of the aircraft had been damaged in-flight and during the ground impact
  • the right wing outboard of the fuel tank had fragmented in-flight (Figure 4).
Figure 3: Left wing in as found position
[Image: ao2017103_figure-3.jpeg?width=463]
Source: ATSB

Figure 4: Right wing inboard section in as found position
[Image: ao2017103_figure-4.jpg?width=463]
Source: ATSB

The ATSB recovered the wing, tailplane, and selected fuselage pieces to a secure storage location. A subsequent search of the accident site by State Emergency Service personnel located some more pieces of wreckage that were recovered to storage.

The ATSB conducted a further examination of the wreckage pieces and documented the damage for analysis of the break-up sequence and pre-accident airworthiness of the aircraft. No material defects have been identified nor is there direct evidence of an initiating event or action.

The pilot was qualified to conduct the flight and a maintenance release was issued in May 2017 to certify the aircraft as airworthy. At this time, a licenced aircraft maintenance engineer certified for a periodic inspection and compliance with a number of Supplemental Inspection Documents (SIDs). No significant defects were recorded.

The investigation is continuing and will include the following activities:
  • Further analysis of the wreckage characteristics
  • Consultation with the aircraft manufacturer
  • Review of the aircraft maintenance history
  • Review of the pilot records
  • Analysis of meteorological data.
The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) is participating in the review of the aircraft wreckage and maintenance records to assess the implications (if any) of this occurrence for the continuing airworthiness status of the aircraft type and ageing aircraft in general. If there are any serious implications, the ATSB will communicate these as soon as practicable.

On 7 December 2017, the ATSB released a preliminary investigation report into the in-flight breakup of a Cessna 210 22 km east of Darwin Airport, Northern Territory on 23 October 2017, the day before this accident.

The ATSB acknowledges the support of Western Australia Police in Albany, Parks and Wildlife Service (Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions) personnel in Albany/Walpole, and State Emergency Service personnel in Albany/Denmark
     
MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
Just in...full story here.

Quote:Sea plane crashes on Hawkesbury River with up to six people on board

A sea plane has crashed on the Hawkesbury River in Sydney’s north with up to six people on board.

The crash site is located at Cowan Creek just off the Hawkesbury River— about 2 kilometres north of Cottage Point. An oil slick and debris have been spotted on the surface of the water following the crash at 3.15pm today.

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter was tasked to the area but will soon leave to make way for police divers who will attempt to locate the vessel and possible passengers.

Three Marine Rescue vessels are also responding to the incident.

At this stage police and search and rescue teams have been unable to locate the plane or any passenger.

7 News is reporting that the aircraft belongs to Sydney Seaplanes.

An update...

Quote:Sea plane crashes on Hawkesbury River with up to six people on board

POLICE divers have recovered three bodies from the Hawkesbury River this afternoon after a sea plane crashed at Cowan Creek in Sydney’s north at 3.15pm today.

No information is available on the identity of the occupants at this stage.

The crash site is about two kilometres north of Cottage Point.

An oil slick and debris were spotted on the surface of the water following the crash.

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter have been tasked to the area and police divers are attempting to locate the vessel and all the passengers.

Three Marine Rescue vessels are also responding to the incident.

A Sydney Seaplane spokesperson confirmed that it was one of their aircrafts that had crashed but couldn’t provide any further information.

“Obviously we are very concerned and trying to determine the details at this point. We are working with police at this time,” he said.

Dozens of A-list celebrities have taken to the skies on-board Sydney Seaplanes to take in the breathtaking sights of the city and dine in the picturesque waterside restaurants on the Hawkesbury River and Palm Beach.

From royal sister-in-law Pippa Middleton to TV host Jeremy Clarkson, an A-lister’s favourite thing to do in Sydney is lunch at top peninsula restaurants Jonah’s at Whale Beach, or the Cottage Point Inn, via Sydney Seaplanes.

Pop stars Sam Smith, Ed Sheeran, Ronan Keating and his wife Storm are also among celebs who have flown out on the trip.

Jerry Seinfeld, Ed Sheeran, Bill Gates and Sam Smith have also had a taste of the premier “fly and dine” experience.

Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding Jr, 49, chose the sea planes as his favourite mode of transport while in Sydney early this month to film commercials for Optus.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau said it will be “investigating the ditching of a single-engine seaplane which crashed at Cowan Creek, Hawkesbury River, NSW this afternoon.”

“Three Transport Safety Investigators from Canberra will travel to the site shortly to begin their investigation.

The ATSB encourages anyone who witnessed the accident to call 1800 020 616 and register their details.”
Reply
Update to fatal Hawkesbury River Seaplane crash.

Via ABC News:

Quote:Hawkesbury River seaplane: Catering giant CEO Richard Cousins and family killed in New Year's Eve crash
Updated about 3 hours ago

[Image: DSbG6tNV4AAE7pJ.jpg]

[b]VIDEO:[/b] Family killed when seaplane crashed into Hawkesbury River, police say (ABC News)

[b]RELATED STORY:[/b] Picnickers watched as seaplane dived into Hawkesbury River, killing six in New Year's Eve horror
[b]MAP: [/b]NSW

A leading British CEO, his two sons, his fiancee and her 11-year-old daughter have been identified as the family who died when a seaplane returning from an upmarket restaurant dived into the Hawkesbury River, north of Sydney, on New Year's Eve.

Six people — including Richard Cousins, the chief executive of catering giant Compass, his family and 44-year-old pilot Gareth Morgan — lost their lives when the aircraft, operated by the Sydney Seaplanes charter company, crashed into the river near the town of Cowan.

The crash was witnessed by many New Year's Eve revellers who were in the area picnicking on the riverbank, boating and fishing.

[Image: 9296716-3x2-340x227.jpg][b]PHOTO:[/b] Richard Cousins was the chief executive officer of the world's largest foodservice company, the Compass Group. (Supplied: Compass Group)

The victims included Mr Cousins' fiancee Emma Bowden, 48, her daughter Heather Bowden-Page, 11, and Mr Cousins' two sons Edward, 23, and William, 25.

Mr Cousins was due to stand down as chief executive of Compass in March.

The firm said incoming chief executive Dominic Blakemore would start his tenure three months earlier than expected, on January 1, Reuters reported.

The 58-year-old had also served on the board of supermarket company Tesco, and was recently named as one of the world's best-performing CEOs by the Harvard Business Review.

The bodies were recovered yesterday but the wreckage of the plane is still submerged in about 13 metres of water.

Witness tried to open door as plane sank
Witness Todd Sellars was on a houseboat only 50 metres away and about to go wake-boarding with his friends when the seaplane "nosedived" into the water.

He told ABC Radio Melbourne he jumped into the water and tried to open the door of the submerged plane.

"I just thought it was coming in low doing a flyby, but when we looked out on the corner it just nosedived," he said.

Mr Sellars said he swam out to try and rescue the passengers but the plane sank too quickly.

Quote:
"I ran my hands down through the windows but I couldn't open the door, it was sinking too fast," he said.

"The plane was pretty long so it was probably three or four metres under the water by the time we got down to the door."

[Image: 9296296-3x2-700x467.jpg][b]PHOTO:[/b] Police have asked witnesses to contact them. (AAP: Perry Duffin)

Police are appealing for witnesses to the crash, including boaties who were at the scene, to come forward.

Mark Hutchings, Commander Marine Area Command NSW Police, said the incident was "nothing more than just tragic".

"This is people who have come over on holidays to visit Australia," he said.

Quote:
"They were in one of the most beautiful parts of the world and for this to happen to them at a place like this is nothing more than just tragic."

"We are deeply shocked and saddened by this terrible news," Compass Group chairman Paul Walsh said in a statement.


"The thoughts of everyone at Compass are with Richard's family and friends, and we extend our deepest sympathies to them.

"It has been a great privilege to know Richard personally and to work with him for the last few years.

"Richard was known and respected for his great humanity and a no-nonsense style that transformed Compass into one of Britain's leading companies."

'Conditions were benign'
Sydney Seaplanes managing director Aaron Shaw said the company was deeply shocked and devastated by the tragedy.

[Image: 9296842-3x2-340x227.jpg]
[b]PHOTO:[/b] Gareth Morgan was an experienced pilot with thousands of hours of flying time. (Supplied)


Mr Morgan was an experienced pilot with over 10,000 hours' flying time, 9,000 hours of which were in seaplanes.

Mr Shaw rang Mr Morgan's family in Canada today to inform them of the news and offer support.

"He was a lovely guy, a gentle guy, he was deeply liked by all of our staff and me personally," he said.

"We are all absolutely devastated at his loss. Ringing his parents today was obviously one of the worst calls that I have ever had to make in my life."

Mr Shaw said the weather conditions were benign at the time of the crash and the seaplane which went down was of a type which is widely used around the world.

Quote:
"We had a flight that departed about 10 minutes before Gareth's flight, the pilot didn't report any untoward weather activities. It was about a 15 knot northerly wind which is perfect weather conditions. It was a lovely day," he said.

Mr Shaw said the company's first priority was safety for passengers and staff, and it had been operating since 2005 with an unblemished safety record.

The company flies 27,000 passengers a year.

Sydney Seaplanes has cancelled flights today and until further notice while the investigation takes place.

[b]VIDEO:[/b] Aaron Shaw says all Sydney Seaplanes operations are suspended until further notice. (ABC News)


Investigation at 'very early stage'

"We are providing consular assistance to the families of five British tourists who have sadly died in a sea plane accident near Sydney," a statement from the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office said.

"Our sympathies are with their families and friends at this difficult time."

[Image: 9295684-3x2-700x467.jpg]
[b]PHOTO:[/b] A de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver seaplane operated by Sydney Seaplanes. (Supplied: Sydney Seaplanes)


Commander Hutchings said the investigation was at a very early stage and investigators were "not even close" to establishing if there were any maintenance issues with the seaplane.

He said Sydney Seaplanes had been very cooperative.
RIP... Angel
Reply
Canada is synonymous with ‘sea-plane’ operations and the TSBC is a very experienced investigator of accident associated with events similar to fatal accident on the Hawkesbury River on NYD.

Early speculation is, once again, useless, however it is essential that the safety loop be closed and our best efforts made, in a timely manner, to reduce the possibility of a reoccurrence. For those interested in ‘expert’ opinion and research, the links – ONE TWOTHREE provide access to the TSBC investigation and research.

It is a dark, troubling time for all those affected by the accident and little that we can do will ease the pain of loss. The word ‘closure’ is not relevant, the reasons why and the knowledge of how may not ease the burden, but will at least provide a basis for understanding.

We must acknowledge the dedication and professionalism of the police and rescue services who are on deck throughout the holiday season; well done all. Sincere condolences to all involved.

Toot toot.
Reply
(01-02-2018, 07:40 AM)kharon Wrote: Canada is synonymous with ‘sea-plane’ operations and the TSBC is a very experienced investigator of accident associated with events similar to fatal accident on the Hawkesbury River on NYD.

Early speculation is, once again, useless, however it is essential that the safety loop be closed and our best efforts made, in a timely manner, to reduce the possibility of a reoccurrence. For those interested in ‘expert’ opinion and research, the links – ONE TWOTHREE provide access to the TSBC investigation and research.

It is a dark, troubling time for all those affected by the accident and little that we can do will ease the pain of loss. The word ‘closure’ is not relevant, the reasons why and the knowledge of how may not ease the burden, but will at least provide a basis for understanding.

We must acknowledge the dedication and professionalism of the police and rescue services who are on deck throughout the holiday season; well done all. Sincere condolences to all involved.

Toot toot.

Update: 02/01/2018

Via the ATSB website:


Quote:Media alert

Title

Media briefing on DH C-2 Beaver Seaplane accident at Cowan Creek, Hawkesbury River, NSW 

Date: 02 January 2018

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau’s (ATSB) Executive Director, Transport Safety, Mr Nat Nagy will provide a briefing on the tragic fatal collision with water involving a single-engine seaplane which occurred at Cowan Creek, Hawkesbury River, NSW on Sunday 31 December 2017.

The briefing will outline known facts of the accident, the investigation team’s on-site activities and the investigation process.

Who: Mr Nat Nagy, Executive Director, Transport Safety, ATSB

What: Will read a short statement before taking questions from media

Where: Apple Tree Bay Picnic Area, Apple Tree Bay Road, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, NSW*

When: 2pm, Tuesday 2 January 2018.

To assist with coordinating the media briefing and to ensure you are added to our database for future briefings and information please register your attendance by emailing: media@atsb.gov.au

*Enter Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park via Bobbin Head Road through North Turramurra, or Ku-ring-gai Chase Road, Mount Colah near Hornsby.

Please note that the entry fee for the National Park will be waived for media and a number of spots will be reserved in the car park.

Media contact: 1800 020 616 

[Image: share.png][Image: feedback.png]

Last update 02 January 2018

&.. via the Daily Telegraph:

Quote:Nosedive sealed fates of all six on doomed seaplane

JANET FIFE-YEOMANS & DANIELLE LE MESSURIER, The Daily Telegraph
[size=undefined][size=undefined]
THE same model of seaplane which nose-dived into the Hawkesbury River killing its pilot and a widowed British multi-millionaire and his family was involved in the deaths of another UK family two years ago, it was revealed today.
[/size]
[/size]


Sydney Seaplanes veteran pilot Gareth Morgan, 44, did not even have time to make a mayday call before his flight ploughed into water, killing catering tycoon Richard Cousins, his fiancee Emma Bowden, her daughter Heather, 11, and Mr Cousins’ sons William, 25, and Edward, 23.



[Image: 1f522b9e3a0254019916772a724b8a83?width=650]
The seaplane went into a nosedive shortly after taking off. Picture: AAP Image/Perry Duffin

The 55-year-old seaplane chartered for a New Year’s Eve flight by Mr Cousins is still in the process of being retrieved from the crash site at Cowan and is sitting about 13 metres below the surface.

The Sydney Seaplanes craft had an unblemished record and sources in aviation regulation confirmed the company was known to be “meticulous” over safety.

As investigations began into what caused Sunday’s fatal crash, experienced pilots described the model of aircraft at the heart of the doomed descent — the single-engined de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver — as one of the workhorses of the sky, built to withstand the toughest conditions in the Canadian bush.

But the UK Telegraph revealed today the same model aircraft had crashed into the ground in Canada in August 2015 after stalling during a steep turn while on a sightseeing trip.

Tourists Fiona Hewitt, 52, her husband Richard, 50, and children Harry, 14 and Felicity, 17, all from Milton Keynes in the UK , died in the accident as well as the pilot.

The UK Telegraph cites a report by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) published in September that details 31 deaths in nine separate fatal incidents involving the DHC-2 Beaver, in which it stalled and crashed. It reported another three crashes in which there were no fatalities.

In its main recommendation, the Canadian investigators ‘required’ that all commercial DHC-2 aircraft in Canada be fitted with a stall warning system that emits an alarm when the plane is about to go into a stall.

However is not clear if the Australian seaplane had such a system fitted although its operator Sydney Seaplanes states on its website that all its DHC-2s are “equipped with the latest technology”.

In the Canadian crash in 2015, the seaplane “stalled in a steep turn” and hit a rocky outcrop killing the Hewitt family, who were on the last day of a sightseeing tour of Quebec.

[Image: 457f489c0f717569b51336ba73211a0f?width=650]
The Sydney Seaplanes' single-engine DHC-2 Beaver Seaplane which crashed on New Year’s Eve. Picture: Supplied

NOSEDIVE SEALED FATE OF ALL SIX ON BOARD

WHEN the Beaver seaplane went into a nosedive shortly after taking off from Cottage Point, no one on board stood a chance, aviation experts said yesterday.

Sydney Seaplanes veteran pilot Gareth Morgan, 44, did not even have time to make a mayday call before the flight ploughed into the Hawkesbury River, killing all six on board.

As investigations began into what caused Sunday’s fatal crash, experienced pilots described the model of aircraft at the heart of the doomed descent — the single-engined de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver — as one of the workhorses of the sky, built to withstand the toughest conditions in the Canadian bush.

“Accidents like this are most unusual,” Kevin Bowe of the Seaplane Pilots Association Australia said.

Sydney Seaplanes immediately suspended all flights until further notice with the company’s chief executive Aaron Shaw confirming it was working closely with the Australian Transport and Safety Bureau, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and police marine command to determine what went wrong.

[Image: d1ac2050fd9cfecc803b7cc4a0995f6d?width=650]
Mr Shaw, 46, did not rule out catastrophic engine failure but seaplane professionals were speculating that it was more likely the plane stalled as it banked to the right on its way out of Jerusalem Bay near Cowan, north of Sydney.

Mr Bowe, an SPAA vice-president who flew seaplanes for 45 years, said the aircraft were generally regarded as safer than other small planes because they usually would be capable of landing on water and even if there was trouble, everyone usually would have time to put on their life jackets and get out.

“But if you get a situation like this and it nosedives, it goes straight to the bottom,” Mr Bowe said.

[Image: 727fa86ded938321875e3d6a1a4b8cd1?width=650]
Pilot Gareth Morgan died in the accident.

If anyone survived the initial impact, the pressure of the water would make it impossible to open the doors.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane banking to the right when it suddenly fell out of the sky. Mr Bowe said it was only speculation but the most likely reasons for the crash were if the plane was banking too steeply or too slowly.

Another explanation could be that it hit an unexpected pocket of air coming off the hill nearby.

“It is quite hilly in that area and a downdraft may have caught the pilot out,” Mr Bowe said.

He said there had only been one previous crash involving a Beaver seaplane in Australia and that was more than 30 years ago.

[Image: 31f7e7e76e7b156971644c7a871eaaa8?width=650]
Police recover debris from the wreckage. Picture: John Grainger.

[Image: 6f7da6c203dd24b552c5fce11fdb78a1?width=650]
A police officer carries a piece of debris recovered from the seaplane. Picture: AAP Image/Perry Duffin

Canadian pilot Mr Morgan had logged more than 10,000 hours flight time, 9000 of which were on seaplanes, and knew the flight from Rose Bay to Cottage Point and back like the back of his hand.

He had flown that route “hundreds of times”, Mr Shaw said.

The plane he was piloting, bearing the registration VH-NOO, was built in Canada in 1963 and bought by the Rose Bay company in 2006.

It was the same plane that flew the Duchess of Cambridge’s sister Pippa Middleton and her new husband James Matthews to Cottage Point Inn for lunch during their honeymoon in Sydney last June.

Mr Shaw said the company’s planes were taken out of the water after every 100 hours of flying time for regular maintenance and the engines were stripped and rebuilt every 1100 hours instead of the regulation 1200 hours.

[Image: c7ee5be5654375fdf9a35192d76ddb2e?width=650]
The plane has not yet been recovered from the crash site at Cowan and is sitting about 13 metres below the surface. Picture: John Grainger

The rebuilt PRATT & WHITNEY engine on VH-NOO was only 200 hours old, he said.

Mr Shaw, who formed the company in 2007 after buying out all five operators of seaplanes on the harbour, said they had an unblemished record. Sources in aviation regulation confirmed that the company was known to be “meticulous” over safety.

Conditions on Sunday could hardly have been better with another Sydney Seaplanes pilot taking off from Cottage Point Inn just 10 minutes before Mr Morgan’s flight, Mr Shaw said.

“It was about a 15 knot north-easterly wind, which is kind of perfect weather conditions really. It was a lovely day yesterday,” he said.

“Gareth departed the restaurant on time. There was no untoward pressure. It was a busy day but we’ve had hundreds of busy days.”

NSW Police Marine Commander Detective Sup­erintendent Mark Hutchings said the investigation was at a very early stage and investigators were “not even close” to establishing if there were any maintenance issues with the seaplane.


MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
(01-02-2018, 10:54 AM)Peetwo Wrote:
(01-02-2018, 07:40 AM)kharon Wrote: Canada is synonymous with ‘sea-plane’ operations and the TSBC is a very experienced investigator of accident associated with events similar to fatal accident on the Hawkesbury River on NYD.

Early speculation is, once again, useless, however it is essential that the safety loop be closed and our best efforts made, in a timely manner, to reduce the possibility of a reoccurrence. For those interested in ‘expert’ opinion and research, the links – ONE TWOTHREE provide access to the TSBC investigation and research.

It is a dark, troubling time for all those affected by the accident and little that we can do will ease the pain of loss. The word ‘closure’ is not relevant, the reasons why and the knowledge of how may not ease the burden, but will at least provide a basis for understanding.

We must acknowledge the dedication and professionalism of the police and rescue services who are on deck throughout the holiday season; well done all. Sincere condolences to all involved.

Toot toot.

Update: 02/01/2018

Via the ATSB website:


Quote:Media alert

Title

Media briefing on DH C-2 Beaver Seaplane accident at Cowan Creek, Hawkesbury River, NSW 

Date: 02 January 2018

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau’s (ATSB) Executive Director, Transport Safety, Mr Nat Nagy will provide a briefing on the tragic fatal collision with water involving a single-engine seaplane which occurred at Cowan Creek, Hawkesbury River, NSW on Sunday 31 December 2017.

The briefing will outline known facts of the accident, the investigation team’s on-site activities and the investigation process.

Who: Mr Nat Nagy, Executive Director, Transport Safety, ATSB

What: Will read a short statement before taking questions from media

Where: Apple Tree Bay Picnic Area, Apple Tree Bay Road, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, NSW*

When: 2pm, Tuesday 2 January 2018.

To assist with coordinating the media briefing and to ensure you are added to our database for future briefings and information please register your attendance by emailing: media@atsb.gov.au

*Enter Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park via Bobbin Head Road through North Turramurra, or Ku-ring-gai Chase Road, Mount Colah near Hornsby.

Please note that the entry fee for the National Park will be waived for media and a number of spots will be reserved in the car park.

Media contact: 1800 020 616 

[Image: share.png][Image: feedback.png]

Last update 02 January 2018

&.. via the Daily Telegraph:

Quote:Nosedive sealed fates of all six on doomed seaplane

JANET FIFE-YEOMANS & DANIELLE LE MESSURIER, The Daily Telegraph
[size=undefined][size=undefined]
THE same model of seaplane which nose-dived into the Hawkesbury River killing its pilot and a widowed British multi-millionaire and his family was involved in the deaths of another UK family two years ago, it was revealed today.
[/size]
[/size]


Sydney Seaplanes veteran pilot Gareth Morgan, 44, did not even have time to make a mayday call before his flight ploughed into water, killing catering tycoon Richard Cousins, his fiancee Emma Bowden, her daughter Heather, 11, and Mr Cousins’ sons William, 25, and Edward, 23.



[Image: 1f522b9e3a0254019916772a724b8a83?width=650]
The seaplane went into a nosedive shortly after taking off. Picture: AAP Image/Perry Duffin

The 55-year-old seaplane chartered for a New Year’s Eve flight by Mr Cousins is still in the process of being retrieved from the crash site at Cowan and is sitting about 13 metres below the surface.

The Sydney Seaplanes craft had an unblemished record and sources in aviation regulation confirmed the company was known to be “meticulous” over safety.

As investigations began into what caused Sunday’s fatal crash, experienced pilots described the model of aircraft at the heart of the doomed descent — the single-engined de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver — as one of the workhorses of the sky, built to withstand the toughest conditions in the Canadian bush.

But the UK Telegraph revealed today the same model aircraft had crashed into the ground in Canada in August 2015 after stalling during a steep turn while on a sightseeing trip.

Tourists Fiona Hewitt, 52, her husband Richard, 50, and children Harry, 14 and Felicity, 17, all from Milton Keynes in the UK , died in the accident as well as the pilot.

The UK Telegraph cites a report by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) published in September that details 31 deaths in nine separate fatal incidents involving the DHC-2 Beaver, in which it stalled and crashed. It reported another three crashes in which there were no fatalities.

In its main recommendation, the Canadian investigators ‘required’ that all commercial DHC-2 aircraft in Canada be fitted with a stall warning system that emits an alarm when the plane is about to go into a stall.

However is not clear if the Australian seaplane had such a system fitted although its operator Sydney Seaplanes states on its website that all its DHC-2s are “equipped with the latest technology”.

In the Canadian crash in 2015, the seaplane “stalled in a steep turn” and hit a rocky outcrop killing the Hewitt family, who were on the last day of a sightseeing tour of Quebec.

[Image: 457f489c0f717569b51336ba73211a0f?width=650]
The Sydney Seaplanes' single-engine DHC-2 Beaver Seaplane which crashed on New Year’s Eve. Picture: Supplied

NOSEDIVE SEALED FATE OF ALL SIX ON BOARD

WHEN the Beaver seaplane went into a nosedive shortly after taking off from Cottage Point, no one on board stood a chance, aviation experts said yesterday.

Sydney Seaplanes veteran pilot Gareth Morgan, 44, did not even have time to make a mayday call before the flight ploughed into the Hawkesbury River, killing all six on board.

As investigations began into what caused Sunday’s fatal crash, experienced pilots described the model of aircraft at the heart of the doomed descent — the single-engined de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver — as one of the workhorses of the sky, built to withstand the toughest conditions in the Canadian bush.

“Accidents like this are most unusual,” Kevin Bowe of the Seaplane Pilots Association Australia said.

Sydney Seaplanes immediately suspended all flights until further notice with the company’s chief executive Aaron Shaw confirming it was working closely with the Australian Transport and Safety Bureau, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and police marine command to determine what went wrong.

[Image: d1ac2050fd9cfecc803b7cc4a0995f6d?width=650]
Mr Shaw, 46, did not rule out catastrophic engine failure but seaplane professionals were speculating that it was more likely the plane stalled as it banked to the right on its way out of Jerusalem Bay near Cowan, north of Sydney.

Mr Bowe, an SPAA vice-president who flew seaplanes for 45 years, said the aircraft were generally regarded as safer than other small planes because they usually would be capable of landing on water and even if there was trouble, everyone usually would have time to put on their life jackets and get out.

“But if you get a situation like this and it nosedives, it goes straight to the bottom,” Mr Bowe said.

[Image: 727fa86ded938321875e3d6a1a4b8cd1?width=650]
Pilot Gareth Morgan died in the accident.

If anyone survived the initial impact, the pressure of the water would make it impossible to open the doors.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane banking to the right when it suddenly fell out of the sky. Mr Bowe said it was only speculation but the most likely reasons for the crash were if the plane was banking too steeply or too slowly.

Another explanation could be that it hit an unexpected pocket of air coming off the hill nearby.

“It is quite hilly in that area and a downdraft may have caught the pilot out,” Mr Bowe said.

He said there had only been one previous crash involving a Beaver seaplane in Australia and that was more than 30 years ago.

[Image: 31f7e7e76e7b156971644c7a871eaaa8?width=650]
Police recover debris from the wreckage. Picture: John Grainger.

[Image: 6f7da6c203dd24b552c5fce11fdb78a1?width=650]
A police officer carries a piece of debris recovered from the seaplane. Picture: AAP Image/Perry Duffin

Canadian pilot Mr Morgan had logged more than 10,000 hours flight time, 9000 of which were on seaplanes, and knew the flight from Rose Bay to Cottage Point and back like the back of his hand.

He had flown that route “hundreds of times”, Mr Shaw said.

The plane he was piloting, bearing the registration VH-NOO, was built in Canada in 1963 and bought by the Rose Bay company in 2006.

It was the same plane that flew the Duchess of Cambridge’s sister Pippa Middleton and her new husband James Matthews to Cottage Point Inn for lunch during their honeymoon in Sydney last June.

Mr Shaw said the company’s planes were taken out of the water after every 100 hours of flying time for regular maintenance and the engines were stripped and rebuilt every 1100 hours instead of the regulation 1200 hours.

[Image: c7ee5be5654375fdf9a35192d76ddb2e?width=650]
The plane has not yet been recovered from the crash site at Cowan and is sitting about 13 metres below the surface. Picture: John Grainger

The rebuilt PRATT & WHITNEY engine on VH-NOO was only 200 hours old, he said.

Mr Shaw, who formed the company in 2007 after buying out all five operators of seaplanes on the harbour, said they had an unblemished record. Sources in aviation regulation confirmed that the company was known to be “meticulous” over safety.

Conditions on Sunday could hardly have been better with another Sydney Seaplanes pilot taking off from Cottage Point Inn just 10 minutes before Mr Morgan’s flight, Mr Shaw said.

“It was about a 15 knot north-easterly wind, which is kind of perfect weather conditions really. It was a lovely day yesterday,” he said.

“Gareth departed the restaurant on time. There was no untoward pressure. It was a busy day but we’ve had hundreds of busy days.”

NSW Police Marine Commander Detective Sup­erintendent Mark Hutchings said the investigation was at a very early stage and investigators were “not even close” to establishing if there were any maintenance issues with the seaplane.

ATSB Media Address:






MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
Forwarded to me by Cap'n Wannabe - TY CW... Wink

By 'that man' in the Oz:
 
Quote:Call to make seaplanes safer


[Image: ca352b6207fe7dfbd42bbef149dbac0e]12:00amEAN HIGGINS

The aviation watchdog will consider Canadian advice that stall warning systems be fitted on the model of seaplane that crashed.


Inquiry call to make seaplanes safer

The aviation watchdog will consider Canadian advice that stall warning systems be fitted on the model of seaplane that crashed into Sydney’s Hawkesbury River on Sunday, a recommendation made after an almost identical ­accident in Quebec.

The Canadian Transportation Safety Board made the call in its final report released in September into the crash of a de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver in 2015 that killed six.

The Canadian investigation report warned that unless stall warning equipment were fitted to the aircraft — usually a siren or a “stick shaker” vibrating the control column that goes off when the flow of air over the wings becomes unstable — such accidents would happen again.

While a spokesman for the plane’s operator, Sydney Seaplanes, declined to comment, it is understood the aircraft was not fitted with such a system.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority spokesman Peter Gibson said commercial aircraft in Australia had to have either natural aerodynamic qualities that would warn the pilot by feel that it was about to stall or an “independent” warning system such as a siren or stick shaker.

Since DHC-2s were “vintage aircraft manufactured from 1947 to 1967”, they would not have been originally equipped with such a device, Mr Gibson said, and there was no requirement to have them retrofitted.

“It is standard practice in response to a significant fatal accident for CASA to conduct an internal regulatory and safety review in order to identify improvement opportunities,” Mr Gibson said. “This review will give due consideration to the Canadian … recommendations.”

The Canadian accident was caused by a stall, and was eerily similar to that in the Hawkesbury on New Year’s Eve: a nose dive at low altitude, during a sharp turn in hilly terrain, on a joy flight.

Most aviation experts think Sunday’s accident also involved a stall, possibly caused by a downdraft from wind travelling over the surrounding hills.

The crash killed Canadian pilot Gareth Morgan and millionaire British chief executive Richard Cousins, his sons William, 25, and Edward, 23, his fiancee Emma Bowden, the art editor of OK Magazine, and her 11-year-old daughter Heather Bowden Page. Ms Bowden was the daughter of Gerry Bowden, who served for nine years in Margaret Thatcher’s Tory government in the 1980s and early 90s.

Yesterday, Britain’s high commissioner Menna Rawlings and Malcolm Turnbull held a minute’s silence for the victims of the seaplane crash at a cricket match between Australian and British parliamentarians at Scots College in Sydney.

NSW police specialist divers will mount an operation this morning to recover the wreckage.

While pilots are trained to deal with stalls, caused by insufficient lift at low speeds, initially the aircraft will plunge sharply downward and they require sufficient height to recover.

The Canadian report noted that DHC-2 Beavers, used around the world for sightseeing and remote area flying, would be particularly susceptible.

“Given the number of DHC-2s without a stall warning system in commercial operations, combined with the fact that low-­altitude manoeuvres are an integral part of bush flying, it is reasonable to conclude that a stall at low altitude is likely to occur again,” the report said.

The regulator, Transport Canada, is understood to be considering the board’s report.

One of Australia’s most experienced seaplane aviators, Kevin Bowe, for many years owned, operated and flew five DH-2 Beavers for joy flights in the Whitsundays.

Mr Bowe said he had not had stall warning devices installed on his fleet because he believed pilots were better off relying on their own feel of the aircraft.

“The Beaver aircraft is a very docile aircraft to fly,” Mr Bowe said. “If a pilot has been flying them a fair bit, they have a feeling about them if they are approaching a stall.”

CW asks the question - is this a kneejerk reaction? More to the point is this another example of CASA being reactive (rather than proactive) to an identified (Canuck) safety issue that CASA should have been all over long before now? Dodgy

Still beggars belief that CASA is trying to second guess the ATSB investigation before they've even recovered the aircraft... Undecided

MTF...P2 Cool
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Oh; for pities sake- STDU.

P2 – “Still beggars belief that CASA is trying to second guess the ATSB investigation before they've even recovered the aircraft...”

That CASA are ‘Second guessing’ is, IMO an understatement. In the real world, the investigators do ‘their thing’ and come up with a report. As the ATSB chap on the TV interview said, ‘if they discover any safety issues they will report them to CASA’ (paraphrased) this is the normal, routine way things are done.  CASA must wait.

Gibson, with his ‘stall warning’ pony-pooh is flagging CASA’s predetermined outcome and intention to ‘influence’ the investigation – yet again.

Short and sweet – “Yes minister; the aircraft should have had a stall warning system; we have sanctioned the operator and made it mandatory for these devices to be fitted”. “Yes, yes, we’ve made it into operator supported pilot error; so just relax, have some more Kool Aid, put your feet up and relax”…

No one knows, not for certain sure, not yet, what killed these folks. But there are questions which Gibson may be able to answer; for example:-

What benefit would a stall warning alert have been to this pilot? At any height below about 100’ there simply is not enough time to recover, the aerodynamics of the float, flap and wing design prevent this.  Perhaps the flap was inadvertently raised too early; or, by accident and the pilot was unaware of it, do we now need a flap position warning; maybe the Wasp engine just quit, do we now need an engine failure warning system? Did a Seagull go through the windscreen, did an oil line let go and douse the windscreen, did the pilot have a heart attack?

In short; until the proper authority, the ATSB, has done it’s work there is no telling why the accident occurred. This obscene posturing and attention seeking by CASA, attempting to influence thinking and presenting ‘solution’ before the cause becomes identified is offensive.

Toot - half steam - toot
Reply
(01-05-2018, 06:03 AM)kharon Wrote: Oh; for pities sake- STDU.

P2 – “Still beggars belief that CASA is trying to second guess the ATSB investigation before they've even recovered the aircraft...”

That CASA are ‘Second guessing’ is, IMO an understatement. In the real world, the investigators do ‘their thing’ and come up with a report. As the ATSB chap on the TV interview said, ‘if they discover any safety issues they will report them to CASA’ (paraphrased) this is the normal, routine way things are done.  CASA must wait.

Gibson, with his ‘stall warning’ pony-pooh is flagging CASA’s predetermined outcome and intention to ‘influence’ the investigation – yet again.

Short and sweet – “Yes minister; the aircraft should have had a stall warning system; we have sanctioned the operator and made it mandatory for these devices to be fitted”. “Yes, yes, we’ve made it into operator supported pilot error; so just relax, have some more Kool Aid, put your feet up and relax”…

No one knows, not for certain sure, not yet, what killed these folks. But there are questions which Gibson may be able to answer; for example:-

What benefit would a stall warning alert have been to this pilot? At any height below about 100’ there simply is not enough time to recover, the aerodynamics of the float, flap and wing design prevent this.  Perhaps the flap was inadvertently raised too early; or, by accident and the pilot was unaware of it, do we now need a flap position warning; maybe the Wasp engine just quit, do we now need an engine failure warning system? Did a Seagull go through the windscreen, did an oil line let go and douse the windscreen, did the pilot have a heart attack?

In short; until the proper authority, the ATSB, has done it’s work there is no telling why the accident occurred. This obscene posturing and attention seeking by CASA, attempting to influence thinking and presenting ‘solution’ before the cause becomes identified is offensive.

Toot - half steam - toot

Update 05 Jan '18: Via the Oz



Seaplane salvage shows ‘quite an impact’ on fuselage

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The wreckage of the Sydney Seaplanes aircraft is lifted from the Hawkesbury River yesterday. Police divers worked in limited visibility to recover three major parts of the plane. Picture: Richard Dobson

The Australian 12:00AM January 5, 2018

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EMILY RITCHIE

Three empty seats at the Sydney Cricket Ground served as a chilling reminder of the seaplane crash that killed six people on New Year’s Eve, as the twisted and crumpled wreckage was raised from the depths of the Hawkesbury River yesterday.

Members of the Cousins family from Britain, who died in the shocking crash, had tickets to ­attend the fifth Ashes Test but their seats went unoccupied as police divers recovered the aircraft from the site in Jerusalem Bay in Sydney’s north.

NSW police divers worked from 6am in conditions with limited to no visibility on the river bed and within hours recovered three major elements of the plane from its resting place 13 metres under water.

Detective Superintendent Mark Hutchings from the Marine Area Command said the fuselage looked to have suffered extensive damage on impact.

“From the time the wreckage was brought on the barge we saw there was severe damage to the plane and it appeared there had been quite an impact on hitting the water,” Detective Hutchings said.

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The empty seats at the Sydney Cricket Ground. Picture: Jonathan Ng

Complicated and delicate, the recovery mission required the assistance of numerous barge operators and police investigators, and was observed by Deputy Commissioner Catherine Burn.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau’s executive director of transport safety Nat Nagy said parts of the aircraft had become detached either on impact or while underwater and that, to ease the recovery mission and ensure everything fitted on the barge, the floats had been removed by police before retrieval.

Part of a wing, the floats and fuselage were then raised to the surface and lifted on to the barge, with police divers searching for more wreckage through the afternoon.

Mr Nagy said no personal items or phones had been recovered, and his team would conclude the on-site investigation in coming days before returning to Canberra to analyse the collected evidence.

The ATSB is expecting to publish a preliminary report within 30 days, with a more extensive record of findings to be handed down in 12 months.

“Over the course of the next 12 months we will complete a report that will aim to find out exactly what went wrong, with the goal of improving safety and preventing an accident like this happening again in future,” Mr Nagy said.

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The plane was modified from a cropduster.

It emerged yesterday the plane had a long history in general aviation and had previously crashed in 1996, when it was in use as a cropduster in Armidale, NSW. The pilot died and the aircraft was damaged, but it was later rebuilt and recertified. The six bodies from the latest crash were recovered from the wreckage within hours of the crash and the coroner will determine the exact cause of death. NSW Police confirmed they had been in contact with relatives of the victims — cricket fanatic Richard Cousins, 58, his two sons William, 25, and Edward Cousins, 23, his fiancee Emma Bowden, 48, who worked as art director of OK Magazine, her daughter Heather, 11, and pilot Gareth Morgan, 44 — and said some were headed to Australia to assist with the investigation.

Richard’s brothers Simon and Andrew Cousins arrived yesterday and issued a statement expressing thanks for the support they’ve received. “We are fortunate and thankful for the outpouring of love and support we’ve received from across the world,” they said. “We are deeply touched by the tributes to Richard, William, Edward, Emma and Heather in the media and throughout the community.”

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The Sydney Seaplane circa 1990.

The plane, a 1964 de Havilland Beaver owned by Sydney Seaplanes, took off from the Cottage Point Inn just after 3pm on Sunday and nosedived into the water shortly after making a sharp turn to the right.

Witnesses, including 32-year-old Todd Stellars, saw the plane flip on impact and rushed to help but could not rescue anyone from the quickly sinking aircraft.


MTF...P2  Cool
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As ‘the boys’ are hard into ‘research mode’, I even went to a BRB without ‘K’ : some of the duty has fallen to me. Could not refuse a polite request to look at the UP; “only the Hawkesbury fatal” they asked. So I did.

There are some six pages of ‘posts’ on topic – 197 posts last time I looked (and it is the last time), uncertain whether to laugh, cry; or, just ignore it all. Tried, real hard to ignore it- fail. There are some fairly articulate posts on how ‘stall’ tests are conducted – interesting enough, but of no practical; then there are the ‘others’. There is a ferocious debate about the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) – as if it matters a tinkers cuss what ‘paperwork’ was inboard the aircraft: really - does, that signify?  

I found, on ‘Twitter’ courtesy of Dr K I Kourousis - a table which provides the ‘fatal’ statistics for the DHC-2 (Beaver).

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Before the ‘Super Phosphate’ bounty was removed, the Beaver made a honest, albeit tough living as a ‘crop duster’. The aircraft were designed and built suited to task - not brutalised, they worked and worked hard, but the guys flying ‘em treated them as kindly as they could – given the nature of operations. The airframe was made to be ‘repaired’ and the robust engines were handled properly – short life for a pilot if the engine was abused. So, the Beaver worked for a living; not a cosseted hanger Queen, but a tough, working – agricultural implement (like a Volvo). Crop dusting is an elevated risk endeavour; not inherently dangerous - done correctly, but unforgiving of error. So, if you look at the matrix – it is easy enough to tell when ‘dusting’ phased out and ‘floats’ crept in. In short, in the right hands, the aircraft is a robust, air kindly workhorse. Properly maintained the simple, rugged design remains capable of many more years of work. You must remember that the Beaver is very much like my Grandfathers axe – my Father changed the head and I replaced the shaft. Safe, simple and utterly reliable – handled correctly.

Despite all the sound and fury only a couple have looked to a simple explanation of what occurred; not even to rule those elements out of contention. This was an experienced pilot, a ‘fit’ aircraft operating in almost perfect conditions within a familiar operational area. Can’t see the bloody AFM had much to do with it; or the ruddy ‘stall’ tests: or, the certification standards. Not yet.  There may be a drone stuck in the windscreen; or a Gannett (diving at terminal velocity for a feed) – who knows. Let the ATSB do it’s work, speculate in the pub, bet beers on that; but why humiliate the profession with never ending humbug. Beats me.

Agree with ‘K’ - well done the NSW emergency services – once again. Good ain’t they– well done. We’d like to send a box of Choc Frogs – but people will talk.

There; duty done. “Yes please my dear, one more here will suffice – for the while”.

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From the Oz today...

Quote:Seaplane firm back flying after six killed

Sydney Seaplanes has resumed operations, 16 days after one of its aircraft crashed in the Hawkesbury River, killing six people.

“There is never a perfect time to recommence flying after an incident of this nature,” the company’s managing director, Aaron Shaw, said yesterday.

“However, getting back in the air is a necessary step given the range of people, tourism and hospitality businesses in Sydney that rely on Sydney Seaplanes.

“It’s also what our late colleague Gareth Morgan, a passionate seaplane pilot for all of his adult life, would have wanted.”

Mr Morgan, 44, was killed in the crash with multi-millionaire British company boss Richard Cousins, 58, his two sons William, 25, and Edward, 23, and Mr Cousins’s fiancee, Emma Bowden, 48, and herdaughter Heather, 11.

The 1964 model de Havilland Beaver took off from the Cottage Point Inn just after 3pm on New Year’s Eve and turned to the northwest before making a sharp turn to the right and nosediving into Jerusalem Bay, killing all on board.

Mr Shaw said unfavourable flying conditions yesterday, including predicted strong southerly winds, forced the company to cancel planned flights but it would be back in the air once weather improved this week.

Sydney Seaplanes was “confident” there were no systemic failings in the de Havilland Beaver DHC-2 aircraft, but it would keep its remaining aircraft of that model grounded until the Australian Transport Safety Bureau released its preliminary report, expected within a month of the accident.

Mr Shaw said services would commence with its Cessna C-208 Caravan aircraft. All flights would be manned by two pilots for an interim period.
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Update 16/01/18: Sydney Seaplanes back in the air.

Via the DT:

Quote:[Image: b3137edec0474bc3f2865acfd2930d34?width=1024]

Sydney Seaplanes to return to skies with two pilots on every flight

Danielle Gusmaroli, The Daily Telegraph
January 15, 2018 11:17am

SYDNEY Seaplanes will take to the skies midweek, two weeks after six people died in a horrific crash aboard one of its planes, with two pilots recruited to man each turbine-powered Cessna C-208 Caravan flight.

The company was poised to resume operations today from Rose Bay but adverse weather conditions has meant the first flight of the year has now been pencilled in for Wednesday.

Bosses of the scenic flights firm suspended operations following the New Year’s Eve crash that killed experienced pilot Gareth Morgan, 44, and five passengers, on board the de Havilland Beaver DHC-2 aircraft.

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Pilot Gareth Morgan died in the accident.


Its remaining Beaver aircraft will not operate until findings of a preliminary report into the Hawkesbury River crash are made public later this month — instead the company’s two Cessna C-208 Caravan aircraft will each be flown by two pilots in a bid to increase passenger confidence.

A statement released today from Seaplane Pilots Association Australia’s vice president Kevin Bowe read: “Given its long and successful flying history, Sydney Seaplanes is confident there are no systemic failings in the de Havilland Beaver DHC-2 aircraft, the type that crashed on New Year’s Eve.

“However, the company will not be flying its remaining de Havilland Beaver DHC-2 aircraft in advance of the release of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau’s Preliminary Factual Report.

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Flights will now have two pilots on-board. Picture: Lenn Bayliss


“Flight services will commence with the company’s Cessna C-208 Caravan aircraft, both turbine powered 2008 models.

“These aircraft are serviced and maintained by Australia’s Cessna certified maintenance facility, Hawker Pacific at Bankstown Airport, who ensure the aircraft’s airworthiness and high standards of maintenance.”

British millionaire Richard Cousins, 58, died alongside his partner Emma Bowden, 48, his two sons, Will and Edward, aged 25 and 23 respectively, and Ms Bowden’s daughter, Heather, 11.

Mr Morgan’s funeral was held in Waverley last week, with his devastated mother and father in attendance after they arrived from Canada.

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Emma and Heather Bowden.


The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) is leading the investigation into the tragedy, which happened shortly after the de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver they were travelling in took off from Cottage Point.

The ATSB is interviewing witnesses, examining recorded data from the on-board electronics and air traffic control logs as well as poring over the plane’s maintenance records.

The wreckage of the doomed seaplane was recovered from 13m of water in the days after the tragedy.

The preliminary factual report into the crash is expected to be released by early next month.

Sydney Seaplanes managing director Aaron Shaw said getting back to the air was “necessary” for business.

“It’s also what our late colleague Gareth Morgan, a passionate seaplane pilot for all of his adult life, would have wanted,” he said.

Over the next 12 months the ATSB will compile a detailed report to pinpoint exactly what caused the fatal crash and use this information to try to prevent future tragedies.

The aircraft at the centre of the crash, which the Duchess of Cambridge’s sister Pippa and her husband James Matthews flew in when they were in Sydney last year, had been rebuilt more than 20 years ago after it was destroyed in another fatal crash.

It is estimated Sydney Seaplanes, which turns over $8 million a year, has lost about $21,000 in revenue for each day it has been grounded.
The company usually flies between 280 and 300 passengers a day during peak periods.

Also on the Australian AAI front yesterday the ATSB released a statistical report on AAI occurrences between the years 2007 to 2016:

Quote:Aviation Occurrence Statistics 2007 to 2016

The purpose of this report

Each year, thousands of safety occurrences involving Australian and foreign-registered aircraft are reported to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) by individuals and organisations in Australia’s aviation industry and by members of the general public.
This report is part of a series that aims to provide information to the aviation industry, manufacturers and policy makers, as well as to the travelling and general public, about these aviation safety occurrences. In particular, what can be learned to improve transport safety in the aviation sector.

The study uses information over the ten-year period from 2007–2016 to provide an insight into the current and possible future trends in aviation safety, and takes a detailed look at the accidents and incidents in 2016 for each type of aircraft operation. 

What the ATSB found

The majority of air transport operations in Australia each year proceed without incident.

In 2016, nearly 230 aircraft were involved in accidents in Australia, with another 291 aircraft involved in a serious incident (an incident with a high probability of an accident).

There were 21 fatalities in the aviation sector in 2016, which was fewer than any previous year recorded by the ATSB. There were no fatalities in either high or low capacity regular public transport (RPT) operations, which has been the case since 1975 and 2010 respectively.

Commercial air transport operations experienced one fatality from 15 accidents; general aviation experienced 10 fatalities from 119 accidents; and recreational aviation had 10 fatalities from 63 accidents.

Collision with terrain was the most common accident or serious incident for general aviation aircraft, recreational aviation and remotely piloted aircraft in 2016. Aircraft control was the most common cause of an accident or serious incident for air transport operators.

Wildlife strikes, including birdstrikes, were again the most common types of incident involving air transport and general aviation operations, with runway events the most common type of incident for recreational aviation.

The accident and fatal accident rates for general and recreational aviation reflect the higher‑risk operational activity when compared to air transport operations. They also reflect the significant growth in recreational aviation activity over the last ten years and this sector’s increased reporting culture.

General aviation accounts for one‑third of the total hours flown by Australian-registered aircraft and over half of all aircraft movements across Australia.

The total accident rate, per hours flown, indicates general aviation operations are 10 times more likely to have an accident than commercial operations, with recreational aircraft around twice as likely to experience an accident than general aviation.

The fatal accident rate, per hours flown, indicates general aviation operations are around 20 times more likely to experience a fatal accident than commercial air transport, and recreational operations are almost 40 times more likely to experience a fatal accident than air transport.

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Recreational gyrocopters experienced the highest fatal accident rate for any aircraft or operation type, whereas recreational balloon operations had the highest total accident rate; almost four times as high as any other aircraft operation type. There were no fatal accidents involving recreational balloons reported during the study period.

Aeroplanes remain the most common aircraft type flown which is reflected in their involved in accidents. In 2016, nine of the 15 fatal accidents involved aeroplanes—three helicopters and two powered weight shift aircraft were also involved in fatal accidents.
In 2016, the increased availability and use of remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) saw them surpass helicopters as the second highest aircraft type for reported accidents; however, there were no collisions with other aircraft, fatalities or serious injuries relating to RPA reported to the ATSB that year. While the consequences of an accident involving an RPA have been low to date, their increased use, and possible interactions with traditional aviation, is an emerging trend in transport safety that will continue to be monitored closely by the ATSB.

Safety message

This report highlights the importance of effective and timely reporting of all aviation safety occurrences, not just for the potential of initiating an investigation, but to allow further study and analysis of aviation transport safety.

While there has been an increase in accident and incident reporting, the limited detail provided for most occurrences, especially by recreational flyers, remains a challenge for the industry and ATSB. This report also highlights the need for improvements in the reporting rates for some areas in general aviation.

By comparing accident and occurrence data across aviation operations types, the ATSB is able to develop a complete picture of the aviation industry to identify emerging trends in aviation transport safety, identify further areas for research and recommend pre-emptive safety actions.

Download the research report AR-2017-104: Aviation Occurrence Statistics 2007 to 2016

Type: Research and Analysis Report
Investigation number: AR-2017-104
Publication date: 15 January 2018
 

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Last update 15 January 2018



&.. from ATSB media spokesperson HVH (High Viz Hoody - Dodgy ):

Australian Aviation Safety Statistics 2007-2016


The ATSB has released its annual statistical review of Australian aviation safety occurrences, Australian Aviation Safety Occurrences, 2007 – 2016.

The report brings together information over ten years, from 2007 to 2016, to provide insights into current and possible future trends in aviation safety, and takes a detailed look at the accidents and serious incidents in 2016 for each type of aircraft operation.

ATSB Chief Commissioner Greg Hood said the report provides important information for the aviation industry, manufacturers and policy makers, as well as the travelling and general public, on aviation transport safety.

“By comparing accident and occurrence data across aviation operations types, the ATSB is able to identify emerging trends, further areas for research and take steps to recommend pre-emptive safety actions,” Mr Hood said. “While I am grateful that there were fewer fatalities in the aviation sector in 2016 than in any previous year recorded by the ATSB, any loss of life is a poignant reminder of the importance of our work to better understand the multilayered causes of aviation safety occurrences.

In 2016, nearly 230 aircraft were involved in accidents in Australia, with 291 involved in a serious incident (an incident with a high probability of an accident). Across the different operation types:
  • commercial air transport operations experienced one fatality from 15 accidents
  • general aviation experienced 10 fatalities from 119 accidents
  • recreational aviation had 10 fatalities from 63 accidents.
Nine of the 15 fatal accidents involved aeroplanes. Three helicopters and two powered weight shift aircraft were also involved in fatal accidents. There were no fatalities in either high or low capacity regular public transport (RPT) operations.

The report also provides insights into an emerging trend in transport safety—the increased use of remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). In 2016, RPAs surpassed helicopters as the second highest aircraft type for reported accidents; however, there were no collisions with other aircraft, fatalities or serious injuries relating to RPA reported to the ATSB. While the consequences of an accident involving an RPA have been low to date, their increased use, and possible interactions with traditional aviation, will continue to be monitored closely by the ATSB.

Mr Hood said the report highlights the importance of effective and timely reporting of all aviation safety occurrences. “This is not just for the potential of initiating an investigation, but to allow further study and analysis of aviation transport safety,” Mr Hood said.

For more information on the increased use of remotely piloted aircraft and its safety implications read the ATSB report: A safety analysis of remotely piloted aircraft systems 2012 to 2016: A rapid growth and safety implications for traditional aviation
 

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Last update 15 January 2018

HVH: “By comparing accident and occurrence data across aviation operations types, the ATSB is able to identify emerging trends, further areas for research and take steps to recommend pre-emptive safety actions,”

Is that like the ATSB closing safety loops on serious safety issues that having been identified, in some cases nearly 2 decades ago, & despite political and aviation safety bureaucratic rhetoric, are yet to be effectively risk mitigated... Dodgy

Examples from the same decade refer here: Closing the safety loop - Coroners, ATSB & CASA

And most recently and still live... Dodgy
FRMS/SMS a lip service exercise - Part VII & FAA IASA audit, FRMS & an 'inconvenient ditching'?

Quote:Fast forwarding again, to 30 June 2013 the following are quotes from a AIPA Parliamentary Brief in support of the NX proposal to disallow CAO 48.1: https://www.aipa.org.au/sites/default/fi...3a_002.pdf


From pg 2 of the brief:

In summary, the Instrument is a step in the right direction but is unfinished business. There are serious concerns about the application or otherwise of the body of fatigue science and research and the preservation or extension of existing provisions already challenged by parts of the industry as unsafe.

CASA has an abysmal record of regulatory oversight of fatigue management, even without the pressure of trying to get some serious traction on the Regulatory Reform programs that have diverted them for the last 17 or so years. Parts of the industry believe that CASA has seriously underestimated the resources required to implement these new rules and that there will be an inevitable trade-off in surveillance activities of flight operations.

If not disallowed now, this legislation will continue with no incentive for improvement unless and until the inherent risk crystallises into an undesirable outcome. That is not a possibility that this Parliament should allow to persist
.

TICK..TOCK BJ - Confused


MTF...P2 Cool
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Update 19/01/18:

(01-16-2018, 11:34 AM)Peetwo Wrote: HVH: “By comparing accident and occurrence data across aviation operations types, the ATSB is able to identify emerging trends, further areas for research and take steps to recommend pre-emptive safety actions,”

Is that like the ATSB closing safety loops on serious safety issues that having been identified, in some cases nearly 2 decades ago, & despite political and aviation safety bureaucratic rhetoric, are yet to be effectively risk mitigated... Dodgy

Examples from the same decade refer here: Closing the safety loop - Coroners, ATSB & CASA

And most recently and still live... Dodgy
FRMS/SMS a lip service exercise - Part VII & FAA IASA audit, FRMS & an 'inconvenient ditching'?

Quote:Fast forwarding again, to 30 June 2013 the following are quotes from a AIPA Parliamentary Brief in support of the NX proposal to disallow CAO 48.1: https://www.aipa.org.au/sites/default/fi...3a_002.pdf


From pg 2 of the brief:

In summary, the Instrument is a step in the right direction but is unfinished business. There are serious concerns about the application or otherwise of the body of fatigue science and research and the preservation or extension of existing provisions already challenged by parts of the industry as unsafe.

CASA has an abysmal record of regulatory oversight of fatigue management, even without the pressure of trying to get some serious traction on the Regulatory Reform programs that have diverted them for the last 17 or so years. Parts of the industry believe that CASA has seriously underestimated the resources required to implement these new rules and that there will be an inevitable trade-off in surveillance activities of flight operations.

If not disallowed now, this legislation will continue with no incentive for improvement unless and until the inherent risk crystallises into an undesirable outcome. That is not a possibility that this Parliament should allow to persist
.

From Annabel Hepworth in the Oz today:



ATSB pushes for more details about air safety events

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General aviation is about 20 times more likely to experience a fatal accident than commercial operations.


The Australian12:00AM January 19, 2018

[Image: annabel_hepworth.png]
ANNABEL HEPWORTH
Aviation Editor Sydney
@HepworthAnnabel

The nation’s air crash investigator is hoping for better reporting of incidents after new data showed how much more likely accidents are for recreational flyers and ­general aviation than commercial air transport.

Australian Transport Safety Bureau chief commissioner Greg Hood said that better reporting “enables the industry, pilots and the regulator to learn from trends seen in more minor safety occurrences to help avoid more serious accidents”.

An ATSB report released this week shows that, based on hours flown, general aviation operations are 10 times more likely to have an accident than commercial air transport, and recreational aircraft are about twice as likely to experience an accident than general aviation.

On hours flown, general aviation is about 20 times more likely to experience a fatal accident than commercial operations, and fatal accidents among recreat­ional ­flyers are almost 40 times more ­likely than with air transport.

The ATSB notes in the report that while there has been a rise in the reporting of accidents and ­incidents, the “limited” detail for most events, particularly for recreational flyers, “remains a ­challenge for the industry and ATSB”.

The bureau also pointed to “the need for ­improvements” to the ­reporting rates for some areas of general aviation.

In response to inquiries by The Australian, Mr Hood said the ATSB had found that fewer incidents and “non-accidents” had been reported to the body by the general and recreational aviation sectors of the industry.

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“For some operation types, such as mustering for example, nearly every occurrence being ­reported is an accident — some 80 per cent of mustering occurrences get reported as accidents. This data suggests that there may be other incidents and serious ­incidents that are not being reported to us,” Mr Hood said.

“When an accident and incident report comes from external parties such as the police, air ­traffic control or other pilots, there is often a lack of detail, namely around what and why it occurred.”

Mr Hood said better reporting directly to the ATSB would allow data to be used to pinpoint risks for certain operations, aircraft and locations. “This enables the industry, ­pilots and the regulator to learn from trends seen in more minor safety occurrences to help avoid more serious accidents.”

However, he said he was pleased with work done by organisations such as the Aerial Appli­cation Association of Australia, Recreational Aviation Australia and the Sport Aircraft Association to actively promote reporting to the body.

Recreational Aviation Australia chairman Michael Monck said there had been concerns among aviators in the past that “if you ever told the regulator something, chances are you will be punished”, but there had been a big push in recent years to ­encourage disclosure.

“That’s something that certainly scared off aviators in the past from reporting. That is changing,” Mr Monck said.




MTF...P2 Cool
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AO-2017-111 Prelim Report released: ATR heavy landing incident.

Via the ATSB:


Preliminary


Preliminary

Preliminary report published: 23 January 2018
Sequence of events

On 19 November 2017, a GIE Avions de Transport Regional ATR 72-212A aircraft, registered VH‑FVZ, was being operated by Virgin Australia as flight VA646 on a scheduled passenger flight from Sydney, New South Wales to Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. On board the aircraft was the captain, first officer, a check captain, two cabin crew and 67 passengers.
The first officer was pilot flying, and the captain was pilot monitoring.[1] The check captain was positioned in the observer seat on the flight deck and was conducting an annual line check of the captain along with a six month line check of the first officer over four flights on the day. The occurrence flight was the last of these flights.

At about 1320 Eastern Daylight-saving Time (EDT),[2] the flight crew were conducting a visual approach to runway 35 at Canberra. The calculated approach speed was 113 kt. At 1320:52, nine seconds prior to touch down, the aircraft approached the runway at a height of about 107 ft, slightly above the desired approach path. The flight crew reported that at about this time, there was turbulence and changing wind conditions. Flight data showed that at this time, speed had increased to 127 kt. In response to the increasing speed, the first officer reduced power to near flight idle.

Over the next five seconds, the descent rate increased significantly and the speed reduced.
During the last 50 ft of descent, the captain twice called for an increase in power and then called for a go-around. The first officer responded by increasing the power at about the same time as the aircraft touched down.

At 1321:01, the aircraft touched down heavily on the main landing gear and rear fuselage. Assessing that the aircraft was under control, the captain immediately called to the first officer to cancel the go-around and then took control of the aircraft. The flight crew completed the landing roll and taxied to the gate without further incident.

After shutting down the engines, the flight crew reviewed the recorded landing data which indicated a hard landing had occurred, requiring maintenance inspections. The captain then made an entry in the aircraft technical log, and subsequent inspections revealed that the aircraft had been substantially damaged. There were no reported injuries.

Aircraft damage

The aircraft sustained impact and abrasion damage to the underside of the rear fuselage and tail skid (Figure 1). Damage to the tail skid indicated that it was fully compressed during the landing. After landing, the main landing gear oleos remained fully compressed, indicating they had lost gas pressure.

At the time of the release of this report, the operator was conducting an engineering examination of the aircraft, in consultation with the aircraft manufacturer, to determine the extent of further damage and the required repair work to be undertaken.

Figure 1: Damage to the tail skid an underside of the rear fuselage
[Image: ao2017111_figure-1.png?width=463]
Source: ATSB

Weather and environmental information

Recorded weather observations at Canberra Airport indicated that at the time of the accident, there was scattered cloud at about 7,000 ft above mean sea level,[3] no precipitation, visibility in excess of 10 km, and a moderate north-easterly wind of about 16 kt.

The approach to runway 35 passes over undulating higher ground, which can be a source of mechanical turbulence. The flight crew reported that they regularly experienced turbulence at all stages of approach and landing at Canberra.

Aircraft information

The ATR 72-212A is a twin engine turboprop regional airliner. VH-FVZ was manufactured in 2013 and first registered in Australia in May 2013, and was configured with 68 passenger seats. The maximum landing weight of the aircraft was 22,350 kg. At the time of the landing, the gross weight was about 21,700 kg.

The aircraft’s flight crew operating manual recommended that prior to landing, power should start to be reduced to flight idle at a height of about 20 ft. The manual also advises that during the landing flare, speed will reduce five to ten knots below the approach speed.

Recorded data

The aircraft was fitted with a cockpit voice recorder and a flight data recorder, which recorded the flight data associated with the occurrence (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Graphical representation of recorded flight data
[Image: ao2017111_picture-2.png?width=463]
The figure shows relevant recorded parameters captured by the flight data recorder. The landing and selected approach speed are annotated.
Source: ATSB

The recorded data indicated that the approach was flown in conditions of light turbulence, and at about 1320:47, excursions of vertical acceleration indicate that the aircraft encountered turbulence. At this time, speed began to increase, and both engines were reduced to near flight idle power. The pitch attitude initially decreased before the nose raised to a near level attitude until the landing flare.

At the time of the touchdown, the descent rate was 928 feet per minute, the speed was 105 kt, and the peak pitch angle was 5.45 degrees. The peak recorded vertical acceleration during the landing was 2.97G.

Continuing investigation

The investigation is continuing and will include further analysis and examination of the:
  • flight crew training, experience and fatigue
  • operator procedures and stable approach criteria
  • weather conditions
  • aircraft loading
  • recorded flight data
  • aircraft damage, and
  • related occurrences.


MTF...P2 Cool
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Hmm, no mention of the mean wind direction P2, wouldn't have been a Westerly would it?

Lots of non aviation development on that western side near the touchdown point.

I wonder when a B737 or similar is going to pay a visit to Toys are Us.
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ATR Crash landing.

It’s a rare thing these days to read some old fashioned ‘straight talk’ on the UP, particularly in relation to aircraft operating. But, every now and again, someone who knows what they are about speaks up. Bravo Di Vosh; hear, hear.

"I don't know if you've ever flown a large Turboprop. If you have, you should know that reducing the power levers to "near flight idle" at 107' AGL is going to guarantee you a heavy landing unless you re-apply most or all of that power as soon as your speed gets back to your desired range."

I'm just surprised no one was seriously hurt.

Toot - toot.
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