Dick Smith – Master Orator.
#1
The invisible minister has little worthwhile to say – while ducking behind the cover provided by bureaucratic double talk and tested time wasting strategy. But Dick Smith does and once again tries to lead an ailing industry toward political recognition, administrative sanity and sustainable development.
 
Dick Smith – doing what he does best and asking for nothing but your support for the efforts made on your behalf.

























The Wagga Oration - HERE -

Good onya Dick and Thank you.
Reply
#2
[Image: DS7.jpg]

(05-04-2018, 08:30 AM)kharon Wrote: The invisible minister has little worthwhile to say – while ducking behind the cover provided by bureaucratic double talk and tested time wasting strategy. But Dick Smith does and once again tries to lead an ailing industry toward political recognition, administrative sanity and sustainable development.
 
Dick Smith – doing what he does best and asking for nothing but your support for the efforts made on your behalf.
1.




2. https://youtu.be/Ns0VdfeJsCY
3. https://youtu.be/erX566DJV-M
4. https://youtu.be/JYZrPjU_05k
5. https://youtu.be/-qS5cwA1m9g

The Wagga Oration - HERE -

Good onya Dick and Thank you.

Dick Smith Wagga Aviation Oration.





Extracts from the Dick Smith Wagga Oration...

Pages 3 to 7:


The destruction of the General Aviation and flight training industry in Australia
 
Dick Smith
26 April 2018
 
[Image: DS1.jpg] 
 
Introduction
 
Historically, there has never been such disillusionment with our democratic process.
 
There is low trust in our political parties - what is going on?
 
I come from a business background, however, over the last 30 years or so I have
had experience with the Canberra “machine”. This gives me an insight into how
that system works, or perhaps more accurately, often doesn’t work.
 
I was appointed to the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) board in 1988 and was
also Chairman of the Centenary of Federation Council. My focus today is on
the effect the Canberra ‘machine’ has had on the General Aviation industry in
Australia.
 
By General Aviation, I mean aviation other than the major airlines and defence.
That is: Charter, Training, Private and Business, Maintenance, Aerial Ag, Aerial
Ambulance, and the Rescue industries.
 
Parts of the general aviation industry are close to collapse, (see the charts on
pages 12 and 13), and it has got this way due to some really poor decisions by
those in charge.

We all laughed watching “Yes, Minister”, that wonderful, insightful BBC series
about politics and the Westminster System, however, there is a telling message
here on why our democratic system appears to be failing. Remember the
hospital without any patients segment with the famous exchange between the
Minister and Mrs Rogers, the Hospital Superintendent?
 
 


 

 
Minister: “But isn’t it appalling that it is not being used?”
Mrs Rogers: “Oh no, it’s a very good thing in some ways.
It prolongs its life - cuts down running costs.”
 
Could that be General Aviation in Australia today? Could the bureaucrats have
said, “Minister, small planes crash. If we don’t have small planes it will be safer.”
On the 3 November 1989 (nearly 30 years ago) at an Australian Made campaign
function, the then Prime Minister Bob Hawke said to me, “Dick, I have decided to
appoint you Chairman of the Civil Aviation Authority.” I replied, “No way, Prime
Minister. We are not going to have an industry in five years the way we are
going.” He said, “What are you talking about?”
 
[Image: DS2.jpg]

With the Prime Minister and Kay Cottee at the Australian Made Campaign, November 1989 - where the Prime Minister asked if I would be Chairman of the CAA.
 
I explained that with the introduction of “user pays”, the sell-off of airports and
the increased regulatory costs to the industry, there were serious problems. I
said, “The airlines will be ok. With tens of millions of passengers they can add
extra costs to the air ticket and it is hardly noticeable, but general aviation,
especially in the bush, will be destroyed.”
 
The Prime Minister said, “What can we do?” I said, “We have to make it clear
that the money spent on aviation safety is always limited by what our society
can afford. “...we have to remove every unnecessary cost - only a viable industry
can be a safe industry,” I told the PM. “Otherwise, how could it afford the cost of
implementing the best safety measures?”
 
He said, “You take on the job and I will support you,” and he did. What an
extraordinary leader and Prime Minister.
 
The do-gooders would have had Bob Hawke sacked
 
We now know that our Prime Minister was in a relationship with a journalist in
her thirties, which was kept secret by the press. Imagine if the newspapers at
the time had put his private life on the front page day after day, after day. The
do-gooders would have had Bob Hawke sacked. We would have lost one of
our best Prime Ministers and our country would be worse off. There is a lesson
here.
 
I finished my term as chairman of the Civil Aviation Authority in February 1992,
having started the reform process. I had sought advice, surrounded myself with
capable people and received strong support from industry icons such as Don
Kendall AM and Max Hazelton OBE.
 
The front page of The Australian on February 18, 1992 stated, “Good, cheap
safety touches down as Dick Smith takes off.”
 
The copy read:
 
“Affordable safety may have been a controversial concept but by admitting
that safety is limited by what those who pay for it can afford, the CAA and the
industry has been forced to examine every regulation to see which gives the
best safety and cost benefit.”
 
“If we could save a dollar and still maintain the level of safety, we changed to it.”
“Among the changes were more individual responsibility for pilots and
operators.”
 
The Australian newspaper, Tuesday February 18, 1992
 
I didn’t realise at the time that the Canberra bureaucracy did not grasp the
truism of the words “affordable safety.” Many in the bureaucracy were from the
military, where cost was not in their realm of thinking.
 
The Civil Aviation Act was then changed, introducing the new cargo cult*
regulation. This is the wording:
 
“ …CASA must regard the safety of air navigation as the most important
consideration… ”
 
Civil Aviation Act (1995 amendment)
 
Now that sounds like a great motherhood statement. In fact, it is more a
dishonest marketing slogan that would suit a fly-by-night shonky airline – or
one of our major banks!! It is a lie because there are many times where the
most important consideration is cost. This is just common sense.
 
For example, airline aircraft could be fitted with ejection capsules for each seat,
which could be activated at the time of a hijack. Safety would be improved
but the cost of air tickets would be prohibitive. Or regulators could mandate
a minimum of four engines for over ocean travel. Once again, safety would be
improved in a small way but ticket prices would be unaffordable for many.
 
*cargo cult - a belief of primitive people that if they build an aerodrome and worship correctly, “cargo” will be
delivered from the skies at no cost.
 



[Image: DS3.jpg] 
  
The front page of The Australian on February 18, 1992 stated,
“Good, cheap safety touches down as Dick Smith takes off.”
 
Closer to home, the higher CASA regulatory costs have resulted in small towns
like Gunnedah no longer having an air service. This forces Australian travellers
onto far less safe roads.
 
To this day the bureaucrats have fought to ensure that this wording remains and
this has been the driving force behind the destruction of our once viable general
aviation and flying training industry.
 



Pages 14 to 17:



Good news with Minister Barnaby Joyce
 
[Image: DS4.jpg] 
Former Deputy Prime Minister
Barnaby Joyce
 
In December 2017 there was some good news.
Barnaby Joyce – clearly a Bob Hawke in many ways –
was appointed the Minister. What a difference.
 
I had a breakfast meeting with Mr Joyce and pointed out that the Civil Aviation
Act didn’t mention that cost had to be considered. He instantly said, “That is
ridiculous, you always have to look at cost.”
 
It was a fantastic breakthrough. He asked me, “Dick, if you were a dictator what
would you do to get the industry going again – especially aviation in the bush.”
I said, “The first thing I would do is fix the Act so costs can be considered, and I
believe we can get the Shadow Minister, Anthony Albanese, to agree with this.”
 
[Image: DS5.jpg] 
Shadow Minister
Anthony Albanese
 
Mr Joyce told me to go ahead and have a go so I used an industry expert to
come up with the new, effective wording, which says:
 
“CASA must seek to achieve the highest level of safety in air
navigation that is consistent with:
 
(a) Maintaining an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation
industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector
(b) The need for more people to benefit from civil aviation.”
 
It was just common sense. Who could possibly be against such wording? Legislation that allows cost to be considered is not a unique idea.
 
Let’s look at the equivalent wording in the British Civil Aviation Act. It says:
“...provide air transport services which satisfy... public demand at the lowest
charges consistent with a high standard of safety... and an economic return to
efficient operators... ” British CAA Act (2012)
 
Yes, totally different to our existing “safety as the most important consideration”
lie. Mr Joyce agreed with the changes and got me to discuss them with the
Shadow Minister. Within days, Mr Albanese sent back a couple of adjustments
and supported the change – fantastic.
 
That was all to change. Within two weeks, Barnaby Joyce had resigned, clearly
because he did not live in Bob Hawke times!
 


 
Change not supported by new minister, Mr McCormack
 
[Image: DS-6.jpg]
Deputy Prime Minister
Michael McCormack
 
Now let’s move to the present time. I was fortunate to be able to arrange a meeting with the new Deputy Prime Minister, Mr Michael McCormack. When I asked him if he would support the change of the Act, he was undecided and said,
 
“I would like more information. I think there should be more discussion and more consultation.”
 
Now why wouldn’t he have said to me,
 
“Dick, this is just common sense - of course I will support the change - cost always has to be considered and I have read so much about the destruction of general aviation, particularly in the bush.”
 
It is very likely that Mr McCormack would have liked to have said that, but with his six years as a politician, I think his “actor” training came in. He knew that any changes to the Act that even hinted that costs should be looked at would be considered by some as reducing safety – and be beaten up accordingly in the media.
 
However, I really hope he will support the change in the future.
 
We laughed at the “Yes, Minister” segments, however, let’s think about it.
That “Yes, Minister” show is an example of how our politicians have become
actors not doers. I was shocked each time I was chair of the safety regulator
in Canberra to see how people – once the emotive word “safety” came up –
were not game to apply the common sense that I had experienced in private
enterprise for over 30 years.
 
You can’t blame individual politicians for this. The vast majority are as honest as
any Australians. It is the system we have evolved to and we have to fix it.
 
Even though I have concentrated on a story about aviation, this is also the
explanation of why so many are disillusioned with our democratic systems. No
wonder Mr Trump was elected to drain the dishonest swamp.
 
How can you revitalise General Aviation?
 
So how can we revitalise General Aviation so we become leaders in the world,
especially in flying training?
 
Quote:Firstly, we need to change the Act as agreed by Mr Joyce and Mr
Albanese – “stop the lie – change the Act – let aviation thrive!” This
should be our motto.
• Secondly, we have to ensure that CASA concentrates on the regulatory
rewrite to remove every unnecessary cost.
• Thirdly, we should harmonise with the simpler and lower cost FAA
regulations which allow a successful, safe, General Aviation industry.
• Number four, we need to get people with talent and industry experience
in as advisers to the Minister and appointed to the CASA board. For the
last 15 years, the person appointed to advise the Minister on aviation has
never been a person with the skills or the experience, or ever stated any
vision on how to grow aviation.
• Five, we need to second experienced experts from the industry to CASA
for one or two years to get the General Aviation industry thriving again.
• And six. We need to convince governments to treat aviation safety in a
bipartisan way – not the point-scoring that goes on today which clearly
damages our country.

The major parties agree on our alliance with the United States. Why? Because
it is of such national interest. What could be more of a “national interest” than
having a safe and viable aviation industry? We need the major parties to jointly
support aviation reform. The agreement between Mr Joyce and Mr Albanese is
an example of what can be achieved.
 


Mr McCormack has huge opportunity
 
Tens of millions of dollars of additional export income
 
In closing - the Deputy Prime Minister, Mr Michael McCormack, has a huge opportunity to support these common sense changes to get aviation, especially
aviation in the bush, thriving again.
 
We could become the world leaders in flight training and recreational aviation
– tens of millions of dollars of additional export income could be earned – promoting massive investment in both infrastructure and services in our country towns and regional centres.
 
The problems I have mentioned do not affect me personally, I’m fortunate. I can
afford the high costs. It’s others and my country I am concerned about.
 
Call for action
 
This is my call to action. I ask you to contact the Minister, your Local Member, the media – everyone – and ask for the “Dick Smith Wagga Proposals” to go ahead. They will be on my website. Sir Henry Parkes gave the Tenterfield Oration in 1889, which was a trigger for our Federation. Well, this is the “Dick Smith Wagga Oration” which I am hoping will trigger the revitalisation of General Aviation in Australia.
 
Aviation call for action
 
https://www.dicksmithfairgo.com.au




P2: Second the "on'ya Dick" - and keep it coming mate -  Wink
Reply
#3
ON’YA DICK, KEEP IT COMING MATE...

Well said P2.
For some people Dick Smith’s legacy when he leaves this planet will be his self made wealth, Dick Smith Electronics, Dick Smith food products or Dicks love of whirlybirds and flying. For some of us his legacy will be how this man in his 70’s tried to save an industry that is integral to the running of this country, the backbone of this nation. There is so much one could say about the man, but his actions speak louder than words. Sit back and listen to and watch the man, it’s poetry in motion.

As for the present government and former governments, Jesus where does one start and finish? Suffice to say that these inept asswipes give billions away each year in foreign aid, buying votes in the public domain, buying seats on the UN Council and contributing to false wars while prostituting themselves to the POTUS. Disgusting disgraceful bottom feeding parasites. Yet can’t contribute a few pennies towards aviation.

‘Safe supported Dick Smith for all’
Reply
#4
Via the Yaffa - Wink

Quote:[Image: dick_smith_wagga.jpg]Dick Smith addresses the gathering at Wagga Wagga. (Dick Smith videos)

Dick Smith's Six-point Plan for General Aviation
1 May 2018

General aviation activist Dick Smith last week presented a six-point plan for revitalising the industry to a gathering at Wagga Wagga.

Addressing an audience of around 100 people, Smith outlined what he believed were the major obstacles to a vibrant general aviation industry in Australia, including the Civil Aviation Act, which put a priority on safety, over-regulation that introduces unnecessary costs to the industry and a political system that encourages politicians to resist change.

Toward the end of the presentation, Smith proposed his six-point plan to resolve issues that are holding back the general aviation industry.

  1. Change the wording of the Civil Aviation Act to remove safety as the absolute priority
  2. Ensure CASA concentrates regulatory re-writes on removing unnecessary cost
  3. Harmonise regulations with the simpler and lower-cost US system
  4. Get people with talent and experience as aviation advisors to the minister
  5. Second experienced aviation experts to CASA for a period of two years
  6. Convince governments to treat aviation safety in a bi-partisan way and stop political point-scoring.
Smith focused much of his presentation on the need to re-write the Civil Aviation Act, which states: CASA must regard the safety of air navigation as the most important consideration.

"Now that sounds like a great motherhood statement," Smith told the gathering. "In fact, it more a dishonest marketing slogan that would suit a fly-by-night shonky airline ... or one of our major banks.

"It's a lie, because there are many times when the most important consideration is cost. That's just commonsense. For example, airline aircraft could be fitted with ejection capsules for each seat that could be activated at the time of a hijack. Safety would be improved, but the cost of the air tickets would be prohibitive.

"To this day, the bureaucrats have fought to ensure that this wording remains, and this has been the driving force behind the destruction of our once viable general aviation industry."

Smith was Chairman of the Civil Aviation Authority from 1990-92, and of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority from 1997-99. During that time, he said he encountered entrenched resistance to moving the focus of the Act away from safety.

"I was shocked each time I was Chair of the safety regulator in Canberra to see how people, once the emotive word 'safety' came up, were not game to apply the commonsense that I'd experienced in private enterprise for over 30 years," he said.

"You can't blame individual politicians for this. The vast majority are as honest as any Australians; it's the system we have evolved, and we have to fix it. Even though I have concentrated on the story about aviation, this is also the explanation of why so many are disillusioned about our democratic system."

Smith said that he recently met with then Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Barnaby Joyce and Shadow Minister Anthony Albanese and reached an agreement for the Act to be changed. However, Joyce resigned two weeks afterward and his replacement as minister Michael McCormack has yet to agree with the proposed changes, saying he needed to consider the proposal more.

"The new minister ... Mr Michael McCormack, has a huge opportunity to support these commonsense changes to get aviation, especially aviation in the bush, thriving again," Smith concluded. "We could become the world leaders in flying training ... tens of millions of additional export dollars could be earned promoting massive investment in both infrastructure and services in our country towns and regional centres."

Wagga Wagga is in the electorate of Riverina, currently held by McCormack, ensuring the town has recently become a focal point of general aviation lobbying and activism.

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...QgOD41b.99


MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
#5
Safety, what effing safety?

We have an industry that is about as safe as it is going to be. Every time a twat of a politican draws the ‘safety card’ we know that they are obsfucating. Simple.

The new deputy PM Miniscule (Casper, as in Casper the Ghost whom you never see) is full of shit. And if these wankers really want to draw the safety card, then why don’t they spend money fixing our aviation issues, fixing the crap roads, getting rid of Jihadists etc etc......Safety my ass
Reply
#6
Aviation Smiths and legends.

A thing which intrigues many is why the RRAT committee has not spoken – either for or against the proposed changes to the Act and the regulations. Shirley they must be completely familiar with at very least the dodging, ducking and weaving around the many escape clauses, get out of jail cards, legal mumbo-jumbo, obfuscation and outright deceit. Ye gods, they sit there three or four times each year listening to the (ahem) ‘rhetoric’. They must read hundreds of pages of submission, evidence, statements, complaint and plain old fashioned common sense; its not a ‘new’ puzzle dropped on them last week. They must know the hellish state of aviation, the incredible fiscal burden on the Commonwealth and the many additional costs imposed on the entire industry through ‘compliance with Australia’s risible, out dated, confused, ridicules rule set.
 
Why must Dick, once again, get out his stick and drum and play the same old song. Even from a purely fiscal perspective – just to save this country millions the committee must (if they have a pulse between 'em) -  see a need to do something. Anything – provided it is not yet another bloody useless ‘inquiry’ especially one with O’Sofullame running it. It is three decade shame on the Senate; they have the horsepower, the legal right and the political connections to put this sorry thing out of it’s misery. Why don’t they?
 
[Image: Untitled%2B2.jpg]
 
(Aside) - I swear if I get asked to repeat the ‘Private briefing’ saga again – I’ll publish the whole thing, must have spun that yarn twenty times now – it ain’t that fascinating; and, I hate being reminded of it…
 
No, that barman ain’t telepathic – just well practiced – “thanks mate".
Reply
#7
If not, why not?

Why don’t they? Is not a bad question. The new minister is pitched willy-nilly into a fairly wide portfolio at short notice; only reasonable that he have time to get across the jobs, find the loo and work out where to hang his hat – seems fair enough. But; the deal Barmy, Dick and Albo cobbled together has real merit and had the Estimates committee given him a quick nod of approval and a ten minute ‘heads-up’ then there would be a truck load of happy aviation outfits singing his praises, instead of cursing him for dragging his feet.

That committee has a hanger full of valid data, some of it thirty years old; surely they could have a quiet word and explain to the new chum they way things are and what needs to be done.

The questions stand – why has the committee not weighed in to support the call for change? Why have the industry bodies not petitioned the committee to brief the minister?

Toot - toot.
Reply
#8
I can’t seem to find a date for this piece by Proaviation – so it may well be old; but, it makes for interesting reading. FWIW – Dick Smith v CASA (part 96)…
Reply
#9
The Reform Plate. A punters guide:-

There is a little while to go before ‘they’re off’ in the fifth running of Reform Plate. For those not familiar with such events, while we wait, AP will provide a little background and after the commercial breaks – present a list of entries. There will additional entrants of course – and not every training stable will want the punters to know which of their runners will be starting. This is in the purest traditions of these events, it allows much manipulation of the Tote odds – both post and ante. It is a fiddle, no doubt about it – but, in these events it is embraced as ‘de rigueur’.

For those who have never experienced one of these events (only one per decade) and never had a wee flutter on a personal favourite; I shall explain (with your indulgence) a little of the history, the race itself, the rules and; as they come to hand the entrants and stable tactics. The Tote odds change by the minute so be careful, as the setting of odds is a black art and purely at the whim of the Bookie.

[Image: 1c35f815e41a589db3d71a8d341714fe.jpg]

And so; to history. The Reform Plate holds the record for the most cancellations, along with the trophy for the most disputed finishes in the history of racing. It is a fact that the event has been cancelled (for various reasons) 24 more times than it has been run. You can actually place a bet on whether this race will actually happen; the odds will be posted on the tote in due course. Of all the events in which the QANGO stables compete; this is known as the toughest, dirtiest, dangerous and most diabolical race of all – there are literally no rules: well none which are paid mind to anyway. There are supposed to be, however as this is essentially a ‘government’ sponsored event – no one really knows what the latest rule set will be until after the race – first across the line ain’t necessarily ‘the winner’. The ‘finishing line’ is decided at ministerial discretion; therefore infinitely moveable. As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees of fair play or a finish – ‘on the line’.

As you may have gathered, there are no real rules and some of the tactics employed before, during and after the race have shocked even case hardened, experienced watchers and punters of similar events. Even extreme measures, like placing a 24 hour guard on a potential entrant have not prevented runners disappearing or refusing at the last moment to participate; handlers are bribed and/or seduced, persuaded (or pressured) to look the other way. To state that it is no mean feat to ever get your favourite to the starting line is not an exaggerated claim. The race statistics clearly show that at least one in three are ‘withdrawn’ or removed from the betting boards. Removing the competition, before the race begins is a time honoured tradition – As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no refunds on a non starter. You get a refund on a late starter however – just because it actually got to the line.

Another of the great traditions is the preparation of the fences (hurdles). These are always, without fail, both moveable and camouflaged, not to mention lethal. Many a leading entrant has been carried off on a wagon, fooled by a subtlety moved obstacle. One infamous ‘accident' was engineered by a ministerial advisory team – even the race committee barred the use of it after much long, heated debate. The ‘pop up fence’. ‘Tis true. Once, a few races back, a non departmental entry was streets ahead, leading the pack as it approached the ‘hairpin’ turn which reverses the track back toward the grand stand. – Whammo – up popped a very solid, very high fence – just long enough to fell the leading horse and disappearing just before the pack turned up. That entrant was never seen again after that, retired to be a recluse in some gods forsaken corner of a remote island…As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees that even if your pick gets to the starting line that it will actually see the finish – not stars.

The punter must also make allowance for variable – at committee discretion – track conditions; it can be anywhere from lightning fast to hock deep gluey mud – depends who is advising the minister on race control – or trying to. The ministerial problem is non of our concern – unless you have bet ‘the business’ on the race and want to ‘influence’ the outcome. If you have, then you have a problem: a big one. You see ministers are cosseted in a glass box, far from the madding crowd, for a start – secondly there is always a pass required to ascend the plush, carpeted stairs to the waiting room (that always costs a significant plenty) – and be warned – folk have died of old age and dementia waiting, the long wait to get through to the lowest intern advisor, the one in charge of peanut butter export. Should you manage to escape the madness of the waiting room, then there are the parliamentary version of ‘the Dementors’. Those who guarded Askaban prison before Voldemort bought the farm. They ferociously guard the ministerial rump and exercise a weird type of mind control. So: even if you get through that crew – you still have to deal with what is, essentially, a glove puppet. But, for the asking price of $5000 you can actually have a second rate chicken dinner in the same room – everything is for sale – particularly the upcoming event outcome. Who knows; you may even get a platitude or two spoken – but the bet remains at your very own hazard. …As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees that even if you reach the minister your entry will even get on the track – never mind around it. (You may also bet on this – good odds for those even trying to get a runner actually in the race)…

Well, that about covers the basics of the event – it’s a hard race, a long race and no guarantee of finishing let alone winning. The field is nowhere near set; but there are some early entrants and the Ante post book is open.…As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees that the field will remain so – the dreaded departments have not declared any runners yet and the odds can change in a heartbeat. No matter, for your consideration: the field:- (so far).

Status Quo; Gelding 20 y.o. Out of Departmental Dysfunction by Total Apathy.  30 starts, no losses, total winnings over $400, 000,000. This is a ‘protected’ animal and the conditions will be altered to suit the entrants current form. The race rules and conditions are always, without fail, designed to suit the top weight favourite. With ministerial assistance, this old, slow, often confused runner always wins every event it is entered into. Short red odds forecast bet 20 to win 1 – odds on - against the punters money.  

Bull at a Gate – Rig 6 y.o. Out of Nowhere by Head Butt. In horse parlance a ‘rig’ was a once horse, but rather than being fully gelded, the ‘proud stones; are left in place. Noisy and troublesome as a whole horse – but uncertain of what it can – or cannot do. It thinks it can and wants to – alas; the spirit is willing but…. Anyway, FWIW you can win 16 for every one invested on this runner – provided the jockey can keep it off the rails, on the right track and not running up the rear end of it’s stable mates trying to help. One wins you a hundred the win - Bet 5 to win two back for it finishing last, (unless it runs to instructions).

Dissenters  - Mare. Out of Pure Spite by Argumentative. Born, bred and brought in from the land of champagne tastes and a beer budgets. Famed for an interesting turn of speed when the CASA entrant is around, unwilling to break with the trainers instructions to let the CASA entry go past. It will however endeavour, through various biting and kicking tactics, try to ‘shepherd’ the CASA geldings through the hoops and onto the fairway – to ensure it gets a clean run to a place. Crafty owners always make sure the mare is in the pictures at the finish. Each way bet at win 4 for 1 - the place.  

Self Interest: Horse; out of Rampant Greed by Inflated Ego -a big dark animal, certainly border line size for racing. Punters must take extreme care before betting a win or place for this entry; the owners can and will instruct the rider to act ‘as directed’, particularly when there is more money to be made by loosing than winning. The fickle nature and venality of the connections are reflected in the form guide; and the interference tactics used in past races have shocked even the connections. Safe each way bet at 4/1 to create the most havoc during the race. 10/1 the win – 6/1 the place - and good luck with that one….

Gender Confused; Out of Yellow Canary by Cover Up. No one is quite sure what this entrant ‘thinks’ it is. It is a gelded horse – however, in temperament, it will happily hunt with hounds Monday and run with the Hares on Tuesday – the trainer reckons it depends on which way the wind is blowing. ‘It’ may support one entrant throughout most of the journey, then, at a crucial stage turn and savage the same to allow another through a gap. As, on form at least, it has never really ‘won’ a race the Tote is offering win 20 for one bet a place; 40 to one bet the win..

Grand Pooh-Bar: Gelding out of Political Need by Misdirection. This is the ministerial advisors entrant. There is absolutely no value in placing a wager on this entrant. The best value money the Bookie dare offer is a side bet that no mud will show on the animal as it prances, poses and preens around the winners enclosure. As sponsored entrants are allowed to take full advantage of ‘team’ support and usually amble along behind the pack until they stroll, un muddied or bloodied near to a winners parking spot; the best offer on the Tote is you need to bet 50 to win one for a place.

Tribal War: Mare; out of Internal politics by Self interest. Not a great option for the punter; more often than not, the mare fails to finish anywhere near the front – last outing, the Vet was called in with a tranquilizing gun, to break up the brawl between TW and stablemate Self Interest – it took four men, two trank darts, and 20 metres of stout rope to part the brawling animals; the Vet bills were truly astonishing. No doubt the Stewards will allow both into the race – again – as they quite often help the ministerial entry.

Fence Sitter – Filly; out of Don’t Rock the Boat by Back a Winner. This entry is a Bookies nightmare to lay odds for. Opportunistic tactics muddy the betting as the owners instructions are always the same; stay back, stay out of the ruck, snipe at the competition when the chance presents and then sneak home as close to the leaders as possible – but always follow the winner home. So, dear Punter you can see the perils and opportunities. You will need to bet 50 to win one for a ‘place’ ; One will net you 100 for a win (odds subject to change without notice).

There is still a while to wait for all the entries to arrive; race day is approaching so there will be an update from track side following soon. This outing promises to be a strange, but interesting affair. Always is when the rules are unclear, subject to ministerial whim and his ‘advice’. The long and bloody history of the Reform plate is the stuff of myth and legend. Many a sound, solid, honest entrant has been carted off the Knackers yard, damaged beyond hope of repair after this event. If you thought that chariot races in the Roman arenas were a brutal, bloody affair – then as my American friends say – Buddy, Ya ain’t seen nuttin’ yet.

Toot toot.

I’m going to wish I’d never started this ain’t I – Heigh ho, it beats knitting.
Reply
#10
(05-18-2018, 08:52 AM)kharon Wrote: The Reform Plate. A punters guide:-

There is a little while to go before ‘they’re off’ in the fifth running of Reform Plate. For those not familiar with such events, while we wait, AP will provide a little background and after the commercial breaks – present a list of entries. There will additional entrants of course – and not every training stable will want the punters to know which of their runners will be starting. This is in the purest traditions of these events, it allows much manipulation of the Tote odds – both post and ante. It is a fiddle, no doubt about it – but, in these events it is embraced as ‘de rigueur’.

For those who have never experienced one of these events (only one per decade) and never had a wee flutter on a personal favourite; I shall explain (with your indulgence) a little of the history, the race itself, the rules and; as they come to hand the entrants and stable tactics. The Tote odds change by the minute so be careful, as the setting of odds is a black art and purely at the whim of the Bookie.

[Image: 1c35f815e41a589db3d71a8d341714fe.jpg]

And so; to history. The Reform Plate holds the record for the most cancellations, along with the trophy for the most disputed finishes in the history of racing. It is a fact that the event has been cancelled (for various reasons) 24 more times than it has been run. You can actually place a bet on whether this race will actually happen; the odds will be posted on the tote in due course. Of all the events in which the QANGO stables compete; this is known as the toughest, dirtiest, dangerous and most diabolical race of all – there are literally no rules: well none which are paid mind to anyway. There are supposed to be, however as this is essentially a ‘government’ sponsored event – no one really knows what the latest rule set will be until after the race – first across the line ain’t necessarily ‘the winner’. The ‘finishing line’ is decided at ministerial discretion; therefore infinitely moveable. As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees of fair play or a finish – ‘on the line’.

As you may have gathered, there are no real rules and some of the tactics employed before, during and after the race have shocked even case hardened, experienced watchers and punters of similar events. Even extreme measures, like placing a 24 hour guard on a potential entrant have not prevented runners disappearing or refusing at the last moment to participate; handlers are bribed and/or seduced, persuaded (or pressured) to look the other way. To state that it is no mean feat to ever get your favourite to the starting line is not an exaggerated claim. The race statistics clearly show that at least one in three are ‘withdrawn’ or removed from the betting boards. Removing the competition, before the race begins is a time honoured tradition – As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no refunds on a non starter. You get a refund on a late starter however – just because it actually got to the line.

Another of the great traditions is the preparation of the fences (hurdles). These are always, without fail, both moveable and camouflaged, not to mention lethal. Many a leading entrant has been carried off on a wagon, fooled by a subtlety moved obstacle. One infamous ‘accident' was engineered by a ministerial advisory team – even the race committee barred the use of it after much long, heated debate. The ‘pop up fence’. ‘Tis true. Once, a few races back, a non departmental entry was streets ahead, leading the pack as it approached the ‘hairpin’ turn which reverses the track back toward the grand stand. – Whammo – up popped a very solid, very high fence – just long enough to fell the leading horse and disappearing just before the pack turned up. That entrant was never seen again after that, retired to be a recluse in some gods forsaken corner of a remote island…As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees that even if your pick gets to the starting line that it will actually see the finish – not stars.

The punter must also make allowance for variable – at committee discretion – track conditions; it can be anywhere from lightning fast to hock deep gluey mud – depends who is advising the minister on race control – or trying to. The ministerial problem is non of our concern – unless you have bet ‘the business’ on the race and want to ‘influence’ the outcome. If you have, then you have a problem: a big one. You see ministers are cosseted in a glass box, far from the madding crowd, for a start – secondly there is always a pass required to ascend the plush, carpeted stairs to the waiting room (that always costs a significant plenty) – and be warned – folk have died of old age and dementia waiting, the long wait to get through to the lowest intern advisor, the one in charge of peanut butter export. Should you manage to escape the madness of the waiting room, then there are the parliamentary version of ‘the Dementors’. Those who guarded Askaban prison before Voldemort bought the farm. They ferociously guard the ministerial rump and exercise a weird type of mind control. So: even if you get through that crew – you still have to deal with what is, essentially, a glove puppet. But, for the asking price of $5000 you can actually have a second rate chicken dinner in the same room – everything is for sale – particularly the upcoming event outcome. Who knows; you may even get a platitude or two spoken – but the bet remains at your very own hazard. …As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees that even if you reach the minister your entry will even get on the track – never mind around it. (You may also bet on this – good odds for those even trying to get a runner actually in the race)…

Well, that about covers the basics of the event – it’s a hard race, a long race and no guarantee of finishing let alone winning. The field is nowhere near set; but there are some early entrants and the Ante post book is open.…As I said – be careful what you bet on – there are no guarantees that the field will remain so – the dreaded departments have not declared any runners yet and the odds can change in a heartbeat. No matter, for your consideration: the field:- (so far).

Status Quo; Gelding 20 y.o. Out of Departmental Dysfunction by Total Apathy.  30 starts, no losses, total winnings over $400, 000,000. This is a ‘protected’ animal and the conditions will be altered to suit the entrants current form. The race rules and conditions are always, without fail, designed to suit the top weight favourite. With ministerial assistance, this old, slow, often confused runner always wins every event it is entered into. Short red odds forecast bet 20 to win 1 – odds on - against the punters money.  

Bull at a Gate – Rig 6 y.o. Out of Nowhere by Head Butt. In horse parlance a ‘rig’ was a once horse, but rather than being fully gelded, the ‘proud stones; are left in place. Noisy and troublesome as a whole horse – but uncertain of what it can – or cannot do. It thinks it can and wants to – alas; the spirit is willing but…. Anyway, FWIW you can win 16 for every one invested on this runner – provided the jockey can keep it off the rails, on the right track and not running up the rear end of it’s stable mates trying to help. One wins you a hundred the win - Bet 5 to win two back for it finishing last, (unless it runs to instructions).

Dissenters  - Mare. Out of Pure Spite by Argumentative. Born, bred and brought in from the land of champagne tastes and a beer budgets. Famed for an interesting turn of speed when the CASA entrant is around, unwilling to break with the trainers instructions to let the CASA entry go past. It will however endeavour, through various biting and kicking tactics, try to ‘shepherd’ the CASA geldings through the hoops and onto the fairway – to ensure it gets a clean run to a place. Crafty owners always make sure the mare is in the pictures at the finish. Each way bet at win 4 for 1 - the place.  

Self Interest: Horse; out of Rampant Greed by Inflated Ego -a big dark animal, certainly border line size for racing. Punters must take extreme care before betting a win or place for this entry; the owners can and will instruct the rider to act ‘as directed’, particularly when there is more money to be made by loosing than winning. The fickle nature and venality of the connections are reflected in the form guide; and the interference tactics used in past races have shocked even the connections. Safe each way bet at 4/1 to create the most havoc during the race. 10/1 the win – 6/1 the place - and good luck with that one….

Gender Confused; Out of Yellow Canary by Cover Up. No one is quite sure what this entrant ‘thinks’ it is. It is a gelded horse – however, in temperament, it will happily hunt with hounds Monday and run with the Hares on Tuesday – the trainer reckons it depends on which way the wind is blowing. ‘It’ may support one entrant throughout most of the journey, then, at a crucial stage turn and savage the same to allow another through a gap. As, on form at least, it has never really ‘won’ a race the Tote is offering win 20 for one bet a place; 40 to one bet the win..

Grand Pooh-Bar: Gelding out of Political Need by Misdirection. This is the ministerial advisors entrant. There is absolutely no value in placing a wager on this entrant. The best value money the Bookie dare offer is a side bet that no mud will show on the animal as it prances, poses and preens around the winners enclosure. As sponsored entrants are allowed to take full advantage of ‘team’ support and usually amble along behind the pack until they stroll, un muddied or bloodied near to a winners parking spot; the best offer on the Tote is you need to bet 50 to win one for a place.

Tribal War: Mare; out of Internal politics by Self interest. Not a great option for the punter; more often than not, the mare fails to finish anywhere near the front – last outing, the Vet was called in with a tranquilizing gun, to break up the brawl between TW and stablemate Self Interest – it took four men, two trank darts, and 20 metres of stout rope to part the brawling animals; the Vet bills were truly astonishing. No doubt the Stewards will allow both into the race – again – as they quite often help the ministerial entry.

Fence Sitter – Filly; out of Don’t Rock the Boat by Back a Winner. This entry is a Bookies nightmare to lay odds for. Opportunistic tactics muddy the betting as the owners instructions are always the same; stay back, stay out of the ruck, snipe at the competition when the chance presents and then sneak home as close to the leaders as possible – but always follow the winner home. So, dear Punter you can see the perils and opportunities. You will need to bet 50 to win one for a ‘place’ ; One will net you 100 for a win (odds subject to change without notice).

There is still a while to wait for all the entries to arrive; race day is approaching so there will be an update from track side following soon. This outing promises to be a strange, but interesting affair. Always is when the rules are unclear, subject to ministerial whim and his ‘advice’. The long and bloody history of the Reform plate is the stuff of myth and legend. Many a sound, solid, honest entrant has been carted off the Knackers yard, damaged beyond hope of repair after this event. If you thought that chariot races in the Roman arenas were a brutal, bloody affair – then as my American friends say – Buddy, Ya ain’t seen nuttin’ yet.

Toot toot.

I’m going to wish I’d never started this ain’t I – Heigh ho, it beats knitting.

Top stuff "K" -  Wink 

'Forewarned is forearmed'

Worthy of following that excellent post, in what is my nominee for the AP QOTM, was a Sunfish UP post #16 which was in response to this latest communicado/update from Ben Morgan on the upcoming Wagga Aviation Summit:

Quote:GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018 - 9th & 10th JULY 2018

GA Summit Participants,

Further to my last email, I would like to confirm that the General Aviation Summit 2018 has been scheduled for Monday 9thJuly to Tuesday 10th July 2018.

I am pleased to advise that the Deputy Prime Minister has accepted our invitation to open the General Aviation Summit, 9th July 2018, addressing delegates from 11:30am. Given how busy the Deputy Prime Minister is, I know I speak on behalf of all the delegates in thanking him for this valued commitment.

I am now awaiting a confirmation from Mr Anthony Albanese MP, who has been invited to speak from 9am, Tuesday 10th July 2018. At this stage all indicators are positive.

Accordingly, I have updated the General Aviation Summit 2018 Programme, which is attached to this email, and I would like to remind participating associations that their Statement of Positions are due in by 28th May 2018. If any of the associations have any questions with respect to the above, please feel free to call 0415 577 724.

I can now confirm that there are twenty-eight (28) registered associations attending the GA Summit 2018, signalling strong support for a positive change to the Civil Aviation Act.

  1. · Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia (AOPA Australia)

  2. · Sport Aircraft Association of Australia (SAAA)

  3. · Aircraft Maintenance Repair Overhaul Business Association (AMROBA)

  4. · Australian Licensed Aircraft Engineers Association (ALAEA)

  5. · Aircraft Electronics Association – South Pacific Region (AEA)

  6. · Australian Aircraft Manufacturers Association (AAMA)

  7. · Australian Business Aviation Association (ABAA)

  8. · Experimental Light Aircraft Association of Australia (ELAAA)

  9. · Recreational Aviation Australia Limited (RAAUS)

  10. · Australian Warbirds Associations Limited (AWAL)

  11. · Australian Women Pilots Association (AWPA)

  12. · Seaplane Pilots Association of Australia (SPAA)

  13. · Rotorcraft Asia Pacific

  14. · Australian Aero Clubs Alliance (AACA)

  15. · Royal Federation of Aero Clubs (RFAC)

  16. · Airtourer Association (AA)

  17. · Cessna 182 Association of Australia (C182AA)

  18. · Cessna 200 Association of Australia (C200AA)

  19. · Cirrus Owner Pilots Association (COPA)

  20. · Lancair Owner Builder Organisation (LOBO)

  21. · Australian Beechcraft Society (ABA)

  22. · Australian Mooney Pilots Association (AMPA)

  23. · International Comanche Society – Australia (ICS)

  24. · Hang Gliding Federation of Australia (HGFA)

  25. · Gliding Federation of Australia (GFA)

  26. · Australian Parachute Federation (APF)

  27. · Regional Airports User Action Group (RAUAG)

  28. · Your Central Coast Airport Association (YCCA)
[size=undefined]

If you are in contact with an association that did not receive an invitation and you feel they could benefit being included, please contact me on 0415 577 724. The Summit is open to all general aviation associations and we are encouraging maximum participation.

Thank you again to everyone for your participation and support towards change, please stay tuned for further updates.

Best regards,

BENJAMIN MORGAN

Executive Director – Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) of Australia[/size]

And the Sunfish response -  Wink

Quote:I am increasingly concerned by what I see is a headlong rush into a veritable Elephant trap set by the public service (the PS) for the associations. Everyone in the industry applauds the efforts being made and is trying to be constructive including me however there are risks in this summit process that need to be managed. In pilot speak, you need an alternate flight plan in case this whole thing turns out to be a waste of time otherwise you will be worse off than before because you will have been effectively neutered by the PS.


The chief risk you are facing is that of being co-opted by the Department - willingly accepting the offer by the PS to become part and parcel of industry change. When that happens, you become responsible to the industry for what happens next - which can be a very sad state of affairs for all of us.

The objective of co-opting is to make you become the Departments lap dog. I have done it myself and had it done to me. The entire PS and all the politicians know how to do it. Aany number of ravening wolves have gone to Canberra in search of 'change" and left as puppy dogs. We start the process with a dose of flattery. The Minister listens attentively. There are lunches, speeches, dinners, fine words and promises to you.

What happens next is that the Minister leaves, promising to stay in touch and admonishing the PS to listen to you. You are now face to face with the PS who will advise the Minister. At this point several things can happen, depending on the egos involved. The Department may suggest forming a small working group, lets call it "GA Australia" (GAA for short) to oversee a rewrite of the Act. They may suggest and offer to pay for consultants to sort through the issues and come up with "a range of options" for consideration, but remember they are the Departments consultants, not yours and the options they produce are theirs not yours. At the end of the day they produce a draft act that you have bought into because you are part of the consulting process weren't you?

So what happens next? You, meaning GA Australia or whatever the new peak body is called, get charged with selling the new product to its constituents and that most likely means selling and apologising for the s@#t sandwich that will be presented. When the industry howls that the new Act is worse than the last, the Department simply says; "talk to GA Australia, they helped write it and approved of it". GA Australia is now the Departments lap dog. Furthermore, the Department now doesn't have to listen to or engage with individual industry groups they simply say; "talk to GAA, they are your peak body now." The Department probably gives GAA a grant to set up a secretariat in Canberra and appoint a local CEO, effectively leaving the entire industry voiceless.

I have left out the descriptions of pandering to egos, dividing and ruling, axe grinding, bribing and pandering to associations that is part and parcel of this process. I've seen it done.

Then there is the question of motives. The Minister couldn't give a rats about the industry, all he cares about is votes. Albanese? Same same. CASA don't want change and this "summit' offers them a perfect opportunity to neuter GA for the next five years until either the industry revolts again under a new leader or dies of neglect.

You need plan B, which is to withhold approval or endorsement of anything and continue to try and build an organisation that is capable of affecting electoral outcomes, in other words building a 'nuclear option' because the threat of losing office is the only thing that always works on politicians and their minions.




These comments followed:

mostlytossas - Couldn't agree more with that Sunfish. You have probably been done over by their processes before. So have I only not in the Aviation field (in my case it was to do with the selloffs of a public utility ) and it's safe guards on prices and service which we all pay for now, as it all meant for nothing.

Your point on them setting up/providing consultants etc is spot on. Do not let them! You must keep control of the agenda and process. They will of course use the age old tactic of divide and conquer . The old " you engineers shouldn't be told by pilots what's in your best interest etc. Will be used where ever an opportunity arises.

As for the current Minister. Word has it he is next to useless on anything technical/operational and will dither and stall till the cows come home finally doing just what his department tells him.

Good luck...me thinks you going to need it.

SIUYA -

Quote:Word has it he is next to useless on anything technical/operational and will dither and stall till the cows come home finally doing just what his department tells him.


I can confirm MT from personal experience in trying to get Mr McCormack to take action on something involving his portfolio that he IS useless on anything technical/operational, DOES dither/stall, and DOES exactly what his department/minders tell him, which is 5/8ths of the sqrt of FCUK-ALL.

He is a complete and utter waste of time.

Sunfish needs to be listened to!!


OZBUSDRIVER -
Well...a weakness! If McCormack is next to useless with thins technical and IF the greatest PM eva wants to through his deputy under a bus....reach out to the guy directly and reverse the tactics on the PS. Need to make the minister believe his advisers do not have his ...and our interests at heart. Nothing to lose. To reinforce Sunfish, the entire group must be prepared to walk away from the table/trap before it gets to the PS appointed talkfest with a counter demand.


thunderbird five -
Sadly, I believe things will play out exactly as Sunfish described. And even if it doesn't and The Act gets changed to exactly the wording that everyone wants, our regulator will just ignore it and keep on trucking. Does anyone really think they won't? REALLY? A Leopard cannot change its spots. We need a new leopard. What we all want probably, is for our regulator to be sacked for incompetence, an administrator appointed, and all our regulations dumped for FAA/NZ which are easy to read.All aviators want, is to have a clear and concise rule set to follow that does not destroy the industry. Every time our regulator puts something out for consultation, it's 350 pages via 7 publications, with detailed responses required by next Thursday. Industry leaders have to down tools to wade through it, on their own dime, perhaps dozens of hours of UNPAID work. Solution? Just do what they do - send an estimate of the costs of reviewing it, with payment required up front before you commence. Use at least $190 per hour, their top figure. (Dick, you can add a zero!) Then after review, tally up the hours actually spent, ask for a significant $ top-up before handing over your report...

To continue with the aviation Reform Plate rhetoric (& in case it was missed), the following important Sandy post is courtesy the AOPA thread Wink

Quote:With acknowledgement to Bill Hamilton and Ken Cannane.


When we are calling for FAA regulations (NZ would be better, they are the FARs cleaned up) here we have IN AUSTRALIA, an example of the wholesale adoption, by numbered reference, of the complete suite of design, certification and manufacturing regulations from US.

This information with minor editing and additions comes from a colleague who was intimately involved in achieving these reforms. Or you can open the CASA rule book and see for yourself.

It was, and is, just as important to the airlines as GA, for example the changes completely transformed the economics of the B767, if we still had the old Australian pre-1998 rules, the B787 (and B777) would not be economically viable on the VH- register.

CASR 23-35 is straight FAR 23-35. Some changes were made to FAR 21 to produce CASR 21, but they were "across the board" benefits also, not just for GA, and the then existing Australia rules for same were swapped out (dumped/repealed) completely. Unfortunately the major update of FAR 21 of 2009 has not been followed up by CASA, and this should be part of the overall reform package.

Therefore it was REVOLUTION, not EVOLUTION.
THE MESSAGE IS: HERE IN AUSTRALIA, is a large scale example of adoption of US aviation rules, with ONLY BENEFITS, and NO SAFETY NEGATIVES.

This should be part of the message in selling FARs, Australia has part done part of it already 20 years ago and it works.

This is not some "leap in the dark", but a proven method of reform and change.

Insofar as the AOPA and AGAA strategy is concerned the PAIN position puts forward a rational plan to reform the regulatory environment for aviation.

The pressure should remain because if the foot comes off the pedal its too easy for Minister McCormack to be swayed by the senior bureaucrats and to go the comfortable cover of Do Nothing Land. To be responsible for major change is not in the DNA of McCormack, if it had been he would have agreed to the minor and thoroughly innocuous changes to the Act as prosposed with Banarby J and Mr. Albanese. He could have got there in a week at most. Months have ground on and the last few GA flyings schools are being put to the torch with a transition to the new and unworkable Part 141 and 142 rules, the expenses will cruel many of the few left. That independent instructors in the US teach 70% of their pilots is of no concern whatever to the impervious CASA. 

Key to the Tim Tam cupboard is in the mail Sandy -  Wink 


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#11
ONE LAST WANK FEST.......MAKE IT SO

One must look on the bright side. Such a gathering is an opportunity for industry to form a guard of honour as the policians arrive and throw copious amount of human excrement at them...
Reply
#12
Sandy and Sunfish both win a key to the Tim Tam tin; a dead heat for sound, sane, experienced advice. To win, as “K’ say’s in the race lead up is no easy matter nor a given; it must be fought for; long, hard and with no quarter or compromise. You may rest assured that the opposition will roll out every unspeakable ploy (much like a French rugby team) and not hesitate to play the man, not the ball at any and every opportunity. In a rugby match – prevention is always better than appeal – hit first, hit hard and hit often – cop the yellow card, take the ten minute penalty then come back, on the front foot. Remember you delivered the message first; trust me, they will take care before trying it on again.

The Reform Plate is not a challenge for the feint hearted (more of Hitch later methinks). It is a mortal combat for this industry’s well being and future; for to loose the race will almost put the seal on the demise of not only an industry, but the national image. We are tarnished enough already – anyone who thinks Pel-Air was a one off  aberration needs to wake up to international, grass roots opinion – anyone who thinks ATSB was not up to it’s collective eyeballs in the MH 370 scam, lives in another dimension, far removed from this time and space continuum. Wake up, shake a leg, get behind what could be the answer to a Pagans prayer. Real reform, in real time – Now.

Yes, yes: I know; there is one on the bar and one in my mitt – been busy haven’t I; gimme a minute and I’ll catch up.

P2 edit: Hic..chug 'a' lug, chug 'a' lug - Hic..chug 'a' lug, chug 'a' lug... Wink  : LMH 18 May '18 - WTD [Image: huh.gif] 

Unfortunately it would appear IMHO that young Hitch is pissing from outside the tent in -  Rolleyes
Reply
#13
What makes Dick Smith tick? - via the Weekend Oz... Wink



The world according to Dick
At 74 and super-rich, he could be kicking back but instead he travels the country spruiking his manifesto. What makes Dick Smith tick?


[Image: 9cb6bd0f8cbacfd3bc549d7a64d2c58c?width=1440][img=588x0]https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/9cb6bd0f8cbacfd3bc549d7a64d2c58c?width=1440[/img]
Dick Smith. Picture: Nic Walker

Kate Middleton should quit making babies. That’s the thrust of the question posed by an old man in the audience. “Have we reached a tipping point on our ever-­expanding world population?” he says to the room of 200 aviators seated before a bespectacled, ­silver-haired millionaire car radio installer in the downstairs hall of Wagga Wagga RSL. “Wouldn’t it have been nice if the Duchess of Cambridge could have kept her family to two ­children as an example to the world?” A local pilot behind the old man’s seat whispers to her friend: “What’s this got to do with aviation?”

Everything, says Dick Smith, the aforementioned wireless-nerd-who-could, standing at a ­lectern holding a fistful of papers detailing the decline and fall of Australia’s general aviation industry. In Dick Smith’s world, it’s all connected. Overpopulation is connected to the demise of Dick Smith Electronics just as it’s connected to general aviation and government red tape and risk aversion and greed and tax avoidance and self-protectionism and pitchfork-and-torch riots in the streets of Sydney, circa 2050.

The richest one per cent of Australians has the equivalent wealth of the bottom 70 per cent. “In history, that’s normally when you get a revolution,” he says. A trigger point. A moment. “A ­Hitler-walking-into-Poland moment,” he says. It’ll all be too late by then and Aussie kids in their city slum shacks will read about this defining moment unfolding right here in this room — The Dick Smith Oration — and wonder why Australians kept shrugging their shoulders at the business and adventuring icon when, all along, he saw how it was all going to end. Or not.

[Image: 2c1f0691f7c8b1205cd5d343dda702cb?width=320]

Picture: Nic Walker[/size][/color]

The Dick Smith Oration. The crowd laughs and applauds. Smith, 74, gives a wry smile. He knows the title is too grand; too wildly ambitious. He’s in on the joke. He always has been. When he was a boy, a teacher at Roseville Public School on Sydney’s north shore asked young Dick to stand up and introduce himself to his class. “My name’s Dick Miff,” he squeaked. The schoolkids howled.

“Say it properly, Dick,” the teacher demanded.

“Dick Miff!” he said again and his classmates howled some more and this felt good to the spindly son of Herb and Joan.

“Say it properly, Dick,” the teacher demanded.

“My name’s Dick Fish!” the boy smiled and the classroom erupted.

He was marched to the principal, who promptly called the boy’s mother. “He has a speech defect,” Joan Smith said. “He can’t say ‘S’ correctly.”

As a kid he was impatient and restless to the point of hyperactivity. He was academically hamstrung, perhaps by undiagnosed dyslexia, consistently finishing last in exams. He wasn’t good with girls or sports or books and words.

“I’d describe him as having a continually restless, inquiring mind and energy,” says John Leece, a boy-scout mate going back to the late 1950s. “They’d probably describe him these days as ADHD but he just had a thirst for knowledge. He’d go grab a snake by the neck just to look at it.”

“I loved radio and electronics,” Smith says. “When I opened Dick Smith Electronics it was really because I was a salesman selling two-way radios for taxi companies and I had the chance of fixing all the Manly Cabs radios so I thought, ‘I’ll start a small business’.” His then-fiancee, Pip, was only 18 and Dick was 24. “I said to Pip, we’ll start this business and maybe it could be like Howard Car Radio, Chatswood, who had three people working for him. That was going to be the ultimate. Within five years, Dick Smith Electronics was making an absolute fortune and I was suddenly good at something: making bloody money!”

Fifteen years ago, he was taking a stroll with his solicitor, Mark O’Brien — savvy and seasoned representative of Kerry Packer, Alan Jones and Rene Rivkin — when he asked the defamation specialist what the highest defamation payout had been to that point. O’Brien said it was roughly $300,000.

Smith pondered. “Wow. I can afford that.”

“You’re right, Dick,” O’Brien said. “You can.”

“I can say anything!” Smith exclaimed.

He then vowed to speak his mind publicly, no matter the cost to his deep hip pocket, on a range of pet peeve topics. Overpopulation. Immigration rates. Tax avoidance by the super-rich. A general ­aviation industry squeezed to death by high-cost safety regulation. “I’ve been trying to say it how it is,” Smith says. Last year he read about the historic defamation payout won by actress Rebel Wilson. “$4.5 million?” he told himself. “I can afford that!”

So he flies across the country in his helicopter packing RSLs and knocking on the doors of politicians to badger them about population policy. He calls his millionaire friends out in the press, demanding they pay more tax. He flies to his friend John Singleton’s house north of Sydney and verbally squirrel-grips him into recognising the fact the national park Singo looks out on from his deck will one day be filled with concrete towers. He makes ­public shout-outs to one of the richest people in Australia, developer Harry Triguboff: “How about setting up a billion-dollar charitable foundation and doing it openly? You’ll hardly know the difference to your living style.” (Triguboff countered that he privately donated to many charities, and accused Smith of baiting him for having an opposing view on population growth.)

Here in the Wagga Wagga RSL, Smith reloads his 100 per cent Australian-made tell-it-like-it-is spud gun. Self-absorbed string-pullers in the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, he says, have turned general ­aviation — which includes all civil flying, except scheduled commercial services and major charter operations carrying passengers or freight — into a ghost industry “with the most complex and expensive rules in the world”. He shows graphs and charts: general aviation jobs going down; CASA wages going up, up and away. He can turn between rants on a coin. “Reduce immigration and have a population policy,” he ­hollers. “Is it selfish? It sure is. Borders are for self-­interest. We should be [directing] our overseas aid … raising the standard of living of women and that will bring the population growth down. Because if that doesn’t stop, we’re doomed as a species.”

The audience applauds. He’s a rock star here. A young pilot attending with his mum approaches Smith. He’s here because Smith inspired him to fly; inspired him to follow his dreams; showed him that in Australia, anything is possible. The kid wants to know how he can get a job flying but the kid doesn’t realise he and his hero were raised in vastly different versions of Australia. “I’m sorry,” Smith says, gravely. “There aren’t any jobs.”

“G’day Dick, nice to meet you,” says Simon Kinnersly, 45, a shower screen installer and hobby pilot who flew here from Ballarat in a plane he built in his backyard. “You were my hero from when I was a little dag going down to Dick Smith Electronics with my dad and we’d buy all the kits.”

Smith smiles, presses through the crowd, shaking hands. “I’d get all the pieces and make ­electronic stuff,” Simon tells me. “Then Dick starts flying around the world solo. Just a legend who started out repairing radios in his backyard. And now he’s trying to save general aviation because the industry is dying. We’re too risk-averse. Australia made it to the top and now we’re too fat and the hungry nations are comin’.” And by Simon’s reckoning there’s only one Australian standing in their way.

Dick Miff with the speech impediment. He emerges from the RSL crowd. “Let’s go for a walk,” he says.

At precisely 5pm each day in Wagga Wagga, a giantwave washes down the Murrumbidgee River that has been known to push surfers all the way to the town of Narrandera, 80km downstream. This, locals say, is the Five O’Clock Wave. It’s a town myth, of course, that has long sent the more gullible of the city’s many visitors down to the river at sunset to wait for an inland hydrological phenomenon to appear before their hopeful eyes. It’s a lend, a hoax, the kind of lark that saw the words “Dick Smith ­Electronics” spread across the world in 1978.

“I started Dick Smith Electronics and we only had $610,” he says. “No money for advertising. I had to think of ways to get free publicity. My first stunt was hopping around on a petrol-powered pogo stick and that got me on television. I then towed the iceberg into Sydney Harbour.” The papers lapped it up. A curious Sydney tech-head was promising to tow an Antarctic iceberg into town and turn it into ice cubes for the cocktail set. “For 10 cents you could have real Antarctic ice in your drink,” he told the papers. “Absolutely pure, guaranteed over 20,000 years old.”

[Image: 5e468415b91c053e66e1039a07c9d937?width=650]
Dick Smith tows an “iceberg” into Sydney Harbour on April 1, 1978. Picture: News[/size][/color][/size][/color]

“Dicksicles!” Smith howls today. One glorious dawn around April Fool’s Day he had staff members phone the morning talkback shows saying they’d just witnessed a giant iceberg being towed towards the Opera House. Hundreds lined the harbour to see the surreal sight of Dick Smith ­towing the “iceberg” — in fact, a dodgy mountain of plastic, shaving cream and firefighting foam — into the finest harbour on Earth. “For $1200 I got publicity around the world, including the front cover of the Chicago Tribune.”

The cheap stunts turned into epic adventures. First solo helicopter flight around the world. First helicopter flight to the North Pole. A flight around the summit of Mount Everest. First balloon flight across Australia. As recently as 2008, Dick and Pip completed a two-and-a-half-year drive around the world. “I’m just a car radio installer,” he shrugs.

A tree-lined street in central Wagga. Wheelie bins on the footpath. White utility vehicles. Vivid blue sky between the hanging tree limbs. A wireless playing songs above a kitchen sink. Australia before afternoon tea. Smith looks along the street and in his mind for a moment he sees the sum of his darkest visions. “The Australia we love so much will be destroyed,” he says. “We are going to take it from this lovely, open, trusting society with free-range kids and affordable housing and we are going to turn it into a concrete jungle like ­Shanghai and only the incredibly wealthy will have a backyard and a pool. Everyone else will be living in 100-storey high-rises, jammed in like termites.”

These are the sort of chipper thoughts he shares with his millionaire friends over waterfront ­coffees. “I’ve got some really wealthy friends who are ­completely obsessed with not paying tax,” he says. “When I say, ‘Pay more taxes’, the right wing goes berserk.” He quotes the US billionaire entrepreneur Nick Hanauer: “There is no example in human history where wealth accumulated like this and the pitchforks didn’t eventually come out.”

Smith’s latest stunt has been decades in the making. He’s become the immovable thorn in the side of Australia’s one per cent. He’s the rattle in the Rolls-Royce, the fly in the Cristal. He knows his mates are laughing at him but Smith keeps loading the spud gun and packing RSLs and the casual observer keeps wondering what it is that’s deep, deep down inside him that keeps making him do all this at 74 because it sure as hell can’t be for kicks.

Smith looks at a map on his smartphone. He’s following a blue dot to a coffee shop he’s been told about. A man in a flannelette shirt with a well-nursed beer belly passes by. “G’day!” the man says, extending his hand. “G’day!” Smith says, smiling. “Pleased to meet you, Dick. Keep up the good work.” Smith nods and that’s a wordless promise he’s made a thousand times. One might assume his tireless agitation of the über-rich would make him the darling of the Left but the Left hates him for his immigration stance, publicly supporting Pauline Hanson’s calls to reduce the annual intake from 190,000 to roughly 70,000, though not supporting her stance on Muslim immigration. The Left calls him everything from a racist to a nationalist to that brilliant uncle who they loved as kids but who got too much sun and lost his marbles.

“I’ve never been a nationalist,” he says. “I’m not ridiculously patriotic. The only people who annoy me are extreme people. The typical Lefty links it all to xenophobia and racism. That’s the Left’s view so they don’t have to discuss it. One of my good friends is [former Greens leader] Bob Brown. I said, ‘Bob, why don’t the Greens have a population policy, and he said, ‘Oh, you’re right, but it will be linked to racism,’ and I said, ‘No, there’s too many people in the world, every race, colour, creed, ­religion, everything’. He said, ‘I agree’. He said it’s a failing and that’s Bob Brown. But to move the Greens and the Left into having a sensible debate about it is impossible. It’s like a religion.”

Brown recalls that discussion. “What I did say was food consumption is the second-largest problem we face in the world and that’s based on growth,” he says. “We had a population policy but nobody took any notice. Dick and I haven’t agreed on everything but he has been a fearless part of public debate and has contributed enormously to the environment.” Brown says Smith should be enjoying more time with his grandchildren but finds himself drawn back to public debate because “he’s too bright for his own good”. It’s the grandkids who drive it all, Brown believes. “He keeps asking himself, ‘What are they gonna think if I left it all up to them?’”

Smith follows the blue dot on his phone and stops for a moment outside a Woolworths supermarket. He recalls when he made his first million from Dick Smith Electronics. “I felt guilty because the staff were getting wages of $50,000 a year and I was making a million dollars a year,” he says. “It was embarrassing.” He vowed soon after to give $1 million to charity and pay at least $1 million in tax each year of his life, a vow he’s kept for more than four decades. In 1982, he sold his business to Woolworths for $25 million. “Never had to work again,” he says. “I put that money into commercial buildings. People think I’ve made my fortune out of electronics and publishing after I sold Australian Geographic to Fairfax for $41 million. I’ve made far more money by just buying commercial properties close to Sydney Airport and on the Pacific Highway and I’m embarrassed by it. I don’t like it because you’re not doing ­anything. I just make all this money and any fool could make money in Australia, which is why one day it will get corrected.”

He won’t confirm his net worth. “I honestly don’t add it up,” he says. He wants to give it all away, be penniless, before he dies. “The hard part is I don’t know when that’s going to be,” he says. Business Review Weekly once informed him he was about to be splashed across their magazine as one of Australia’s 200 wealthiest individuals. He promptly phoned BRW and asked how much he had to give to charity to ensure he fell off the list. That same day he instructed his CEO, Ike Bain — “the man who made me all my money” — to write a cheque for $4 million to the Salvos. He tosses his hard-earned into his range of Australian-made and owned foods — OzEmite, OzEhoney, OzEchoc — and the profits are dispersed across more than 100 charities, from Aussie Helpers to Care Australia to Parkinson’s NSW to Youth Off the Streets to the National Centre for Childhood Grief. He gave almost $50,000 to the legal fight to bring ­former terrorism suspect David Hicks home.

“People used to write in to him all the time with genuine hard luck stories and he would leave all these notes for me on the letters: ‘Send 2K’, ‘Send 5K’,” Bain recalls. “He could be very tight when it came to turning the lights off, then you’d get a note saying, ‘Give 4 mill’.”

He’s not the easiest bloke to work for. Staff ­writers in the early years of Australian Geographic were stunned by his leadership style. “Confrontationalist, abrupt, blunt and rude,” one staffer told this newspaper in 1999. He admits today to regular strip-tearing of staff back then. “Did I ever,” he says. “I wanted a standard.”

“An attention span of five seconds,” explains Bain. “He can be very impatient at times and that comes across to some people as rude.” The staffers who called him blunt and rude, however, were the same who called him exhilarating and honest — and honesty, says Bain, is valued above all else. He had a neon “NO” sign on his office wall that would flash when he rejected staff ideas. Some days he’d hit a taxi meter when staff stepped into his office. Time is money. Simple. Staff knew where they stood with Dick Smith. None of the Machiavellian ruthlessness that he sees infecting big business today.

“Australia’s had 150 years of easy growth and now, as we get to the limits, people have to be absolutely ruthless,” he says. “They’re destroying each other so they can keep a job. And how I know this is I was taken aside by one of the ­Woolworths executives. He said, ‘We once had an edict that said everyone has to be able to make a dollar — the farmer, the processor — and that’s all gone and now we have to have never-ending profit increases or the board will get the sack.’”

Two young women at a set of traffic lights in Wagga Wagga recognise Smith and smile. “Excuse me,” he says. “Can you direct me to the Trail Street Coffee Shop?” Something about the way he squints at his smartphone, like the technology betrayed him somehow, makes the young women giggle. If there’s a god he believes in then it’s the god of microchips and circuits. “Thanks so much,” he says.

In 2013, Dick Smith Electronics was floated by a private equity firm and went into administration three years later, resulting in the closure of 363 stores across Australia and New Zealand. “When it went broke it fulfilled everything I’d been ­saying,” he says. “I said, ‘It’s a shop that sells to ­electronics enthusiasts, you can have about 100 [stores]. Why the greed?’ And they said, ‘We’ve gotta grow’. It all allowed me to do hundreds of interviews just to rubbish them.”

He walks in silence for a long moment. “The really wealthy will always be quite OK. And they’ll be isolated from the reality of young people never having a proper job. And the young people can just sell coffee. Just about every ­problem we have today is harder to fix with more people. The ­driving problem behind the whole issue is that our system of capitalism requires ­perpetual growth. It’s a giant Ponzi scheme! It’s a system that requires enormous waste to keep everyone employed and I don’t think it’s going to be fixed until something drastic happens.”

He opens the glass door of the cafe. Two handsome young people behind the counter. “Hello, is this the Trail Street Coffee Shop?”

“Hello Dick Smith!” says a bearded man at the counter. “We’ve come for an unbelievably expensive lunch,” Smith says. The men at the counter laugh. He peruses the menu. “Oh, smashed avocado!” he sighs. “I’ve never had a smashed avocado in my life and I’m never going to.” He’s talking loudly, with bluster; it’s Dick Miff in the classroom holding court. “You should treat yourself,” one of the men says. “No, I just want a sandwich.” He peruses the display filled with Turkish breads and sourdoughs and roasted capsicum strips and olives and feta cheese. “Can you just make a typical Aussie sandwich?” “OzEmite sanga, maybe?” I suggest. “Ha!” he says. “Do you know what? All this stuff from Turkey and Greece” — his hands waving at the sandwich display — “this is what they came here to get away from. Now we’ve got their food.”

We sit outside at a table. “What was that in there?” I ask. He smiles, shrugs his shoulders. “I’m acting,” he says. He’s done that for years, effortlessly changing gears into the Dick Smith he thinks the public wants him to be. He says the face that beamed off all those shopfront signs for all those years wasn’t really him in many ways. The exuberant entrepreneur on the pogo stick, even the fearless adventurer dodging mountains in blinding storms. “I never thought that Dick Smith was me,” he says. “I’m a loner, really. I love being by myself. Since a kid I’ve been a loner. I’d come home from school and disappear into the bush.”

Some days, when he was about 12, he’d come home and find his father, Herb, lying in a heap of nerves and worry on his bed. Dick grew up in the Australia his father had fought for in Bougainville in World War II. Every Anzac Day he thanks marchers for giving him that Australia, stands for hours by the barriers holding a large sign that ­simply says, “Thanks”. Herb Smith is somewhere deep inside all his tireless agitation for change. It was Herb who told his son about the importance of paying taxes. “He said, ‘Never complain about your tax, that’s why our country is so fantastic’.”

It was Herb who taught him the power and peril of business; how success and failure, good luck and bad luck and the uneven distribution of both can change a family. “My dad started a printing company and it went broke,” he says. “And I saw all that as a kid.” He leans in, brings his hands together. “He had a nervous breakdown. He lay in bed for 12 months. My mother …” And he chokes on that word. “My mother …” Tears flood his face. No performance in it, just a sudden and jarring 10-second assault of emotion where he weeps between words that come out in gulps. “She never worked … in her life … and she … went … and got a job … she had no qualifications.”

Then he shakes his head and snaps instantly out of the deep emotion, as if he has just found a drawer inside his cluttered mind to file it away. “And I come home from school and Dad’s in a complete mental breakdown because he’d borrowed this money to start a printing business and he lost everything.” He pauses to think. “I don’t know why. I just think he wasn’t a good businessman. I don’t think he was ever tough enough for business. He lost everything, but he paid it all back. Over the next five years, he paid them back.”

He’ll think on this subject tonight, and tomorrow he’ll send me an email: “By the way, when I mentioned my dad and said that I thought he probably wasn’t a good businessman, there is one redeeming feature — he was honest. He had a lovely nature, looked after our family and was always helping others. That is far more important than being a good businessman!”

His ham and cheese toastie arrives with a strawberry milkshake. It’s a hearty toastie but the cafe boys have modernised it somehow, hipsterfied it. Smith shrugs. It’s not his Australia anymore. It’s sure as hell not Herb’s.

[Image: f61f908385e986254825af550f89f701?width=650]
Dick Smith with wife Pip and daughters Hayley and Jenny in 1982. Picture: News[/size][/color][/size][/color]

He brings a picture of his wife and daughters up on his phone. It’s his favourite photo. It’s 1982 and his girls, Hayley and Jenny, are not yet teens, dressed in clothes that Pip made herself. Smith’s about to take off on a solo flight around the world in which he’ll cement his status as a legend and nearly kill himself at least five times in the process. “How could I be so stupid,” he says. “I had this beautiful wife and daughters. What was I thinking?”

He’s got so much out of this country and those three women in his life were always the pot of gold at the end of his rainbow. He’s looking into that image and he’s going somewhere deep inside himself towards some new knowing but he’s pulled back out again by a couple of Wagga lads.

“Sorry, Mr Smith,” one says, “sorry to interrupt.”

“G’day,” Dick says, leaning back in his seat.

“We love your work. Keep it up.”

“Oh, aren’t you great. What particular thing do you like about what I do?”

“Awww, just how you support the Australian workers, keeping it in-house.”

“What do you do?”

“I’m at uni and I’m a youth worker.”

“Wonderful,” Dick smiles.

“Can we get a selfie?”

“Certainly.” Click.

The boys walk away, beaming, and Smith slowly finds his way back to the Dick Smith ­Oration. His beautiful country. The future for that youth worker and his kids. “The most common thing I get stopped on is people wanting me to become prime minister,” he says. “I walk down the road and they yell, ‘Dick, we want you to become prime minister!’ and I say, ‘Only if I’m a dictator’. I can be dictator for a couple of years and make the changes needed and then they can shoot me. I’d have something to offend everyone and everyone would hate me.”

Immediate clamps on immigration. Full disclosure of taxes paid by Australia’s wealthiest one per cent. Overseas aid boosts to assist population ­stabilisation. Ham and cheese toasties made from plain bloody white bread. “Dick Smith the dic­tator,” he roars. He raises his fist, always the first in on the joke. “The Dick-tatorrrrrrr!

TRENT DALTON
[Image: trent_dalton.png]
The Weekend Australian Magazine
@TrentDalton
Trent Dalton writes for The Weekend Australian Magazine. He’s a two-time Walkley Award winner; three-time Kennedy Award winner for excellence in NSW journalism and a four-time winner of the national News Awards Features Journalist of the Year. In 2011, he was named Queensland Journalist of the Year at the Clarion Awards for excellence in Queensland journalism. His debut literary fiction novel, Boy Swallows Universe, will be published in June, 2018, by Harper Collins.




MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#14
A note, from a wise owl:-

I’m not going to try and expand on the following missive from the BRB E-mail chain; it speaks well enough for itself. It also speaks well of the politicians efforts – but it poses a question; “Why despite some serious efforts by government ministers has reform never happened?

The whole history of ‘reform’ shows quite clearly that the government, despite their best efforts, have no control whatsoever. How can that be? Had the 1996 reforms been accepted by CASA we’d be a lot better off today; and, a monster bill of hundreds of millions wasted could have been avoided; and, we’d have a rule set which served the industry instead of an industry serving those who decide what our present rules may or may not mean.

Now we have McComic who daren’t even say Boo to the tea lady without permission and advisory support – Don’t let CASA rule the people and the government – just tell them; the change must happen, get it done: make it a condition of employment.

A dab of history and a bloody big question mark. Cheers P747.


Quote:“K ....[you] might consider adding that adopting the FARs had Labor support in 1996 -1998, also re-writing to whole Act.

Laurie Brereton was particularly keen to change the Act, as Minister he did a lot of head-butting with CAA/CASA (as did Beazley). As a shadow Minister, Martin Ferguson supported the above AND also a complete overhaul of CASA with the recalcitrant being given the involuntary opportunity to “spend more time with the family” ---- which is what Anderson wanted to do until he had the rug pulled out from underneath him by PM&C. Anderson planned to fire the whole top management of CASA, install his own, and “start again”.

The PAP/CASA Review intent re. S.9A of the Act was to re-word it to more accurately reflect the Classifications Policy that was in place from 1998 up to Byron, graduated risk management from almost nothing in the sports aviation area, to the traditional level of ICAO compliant regulation for HCRPT. Once Byron and Vaughan were forced out, the iron ring had no opposition, the present disastrous 'cost is no object' recent rules are the result.

The theoretical risk management approach, which became the Classification of Operations policy and a Byron directive (1/2007?) was put together by Ken Lewis and myself in 1996. Qantas helpfully produced all the overhead/presentation material for the first meetings on the subject.

In practical terms the FAAs Act and regulations do just this. The level of regulation, both Operations and Continuing Airworthiness, escalate from Part 91 through 135, 125 and 121 (not in numerical order).”


This is not ‘food-for-thought’; its an alarm clock going off, loud enough to wake the dead or those asleep at the wheel.

Time to wake up Sleepy heads.

Toot – toot.
Reply
#15
A message from wren 460Wink , via the UP: 

Quote:Medical reform etc.

Quote:
Quote:Originally Posted by Eyrie [Image: viewpost.gif]

Is this the AOPA that was crowing about medical "reform" having been achieved.?
There has been zero, zilch, zip, nada, gar nichts, in the way of meaningful medical reform of the Class 2 in Australia. NONE. Just a very small re-organisation of CASA's administration thereof leaving Australia way out of step with the USA and the UK.
AOPA will continue to be as useless as ever and many of the organisations at this summit have a vested interest in the status quo. I know of a couple where the "leadership" isn't representative of the membership.

Understanding your frustration but your judgment, with respect, is overly harsh. I’ve recently received my Class2 renewal, though late but with one very different condition. For the first time a report on a condition that they require may come from my GP. In addition it’s too early to completely discount the reforms that Mr. Carmody has promised.

Considering how well AOPA is getting publicity and winning new members, joining with and supporting Dick Smith’s change the Act push, this is a far cry from useless, not to mention many other wins. Also you may not be aware of it’s program to get young people engaged, a great initiative which has had many young people gain an aviation experience which would never have happened without Ben Morgan, Marc De Stoop and the new Board of AOPA.

It has also pulled together, with many other organisations, a meeting with Minister McCormack and Mr. Albanese in July. No mean feat and more than anyone has done in many a long year. You are correct that some will consider their own interests more than the greater good. This is always a human nature trait that good leadership will overcome by presenting a case for the practical outcomes of changes that will improve conditions for the aviation industry as a whole. The self interest instinct is the basic flaw in calling for concensus. Concensus is a concept that is difficult to pin down as the Summit meeting will likely find out. At this point strong leadership will diplomatically discount the voice or voices of dissent and declare the agreed position fixed by the majority. A position that should, as far as is possible, be agreed before the meeting. I’m hoping that the Summit will explain; 

1. The time for talk has passed. 
2. We will not be sending delegates to Canberra without framed legislation pending. 
3. We will be taking strong political action.
4. We expect legislation to be expedited to change the Act and the remainder of the FARs (or NZ rules) to be introduced as were, 20 years ago, CASR Parts 23-35, drawn from FAA Parts 23-35. Replacing those parts of out of date Aussie rules which were dumped. It can be done, it’s actually part done, now finish the job. 
5. We expect that strict liability be removed and that criminality be via the general law, ie reckless or malicious behaviour in any field is quite sufficient as it is throughout the land. 
6. All references to licence “privileges” be removed or not inserted into the reformed rules. It is our right to fly within reasonable rules, this medieval notion, privilege in law, is derived from the Crown being the only one with rights and therefore doling out privileges, the Royal patronage (‘mon droit’).

Quote:Eyrie followed with: " may come from my GP."
The key word is "may". Your GP might just kick it to CASA.

"Considering how well AOPA is getting publicity and winning new members, joining with and supporting Dick Smith’s change the Act push, this is a far cry from useless, not to mention many other wins. Also you may not be aware of it’s program to get young people engaged, a great initiative which has had many young people gain an aviation experience which would never have happened without Ben Morgan, Marc De Stoop and the new Board of AOPA."

Very nice for AOPA to be getting new members etc but it doesn't do anything about the ridiculous regulation we are under.

Now about:
"There has been zero, zilch, zip, nada, gar nichts, in the way of meaningful medical reform of the Class 2 in Australia. NONE. Just a very small re-organisation of CASA's administration thereof leaving Australia way out of step with the USA and the UK."

Where exactly am I wrong? Whoop dee doo, your GPS may certify a certain condition. CASA AVMED can still take that and demand a specialist's report.

Did you read the 160 odd submissions to CASA on medical reform? I did. What we have is NOTHING and certainly nothing like the vast majority of the submissions, including from a former CASA Chief Medical Officer. We are way out of line with recent UK and US medical reform.

Combine that with with utterly stupid and impractical maintenance regs (modeled on the EASA regs) and we are the most stupidly, highly regulated, aviators in the anglosphere. Even EASA has realised its maintenance regs are impractical for light aircraft and gliders and are changing them.

See here:
https://www.easa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/dfu/EASA_GA_ROADMAP_2018_EN_final.pdf


As for your point 6.


6. All references to licence “privileges” be removed or not inserted into the reformed rules. It is our right to fly within reasonable rules, this medieval notion, privilege in law, is derived from the Crown being the only one with rights and therefore doling out privileges, the Royal patronage (‘mon droit’).

I completely agree. "Privilege" has no place in a liberal democracy which Australia at least used to be and still pretends to be. Unfortunately subjects in Australia ( that is what we are, not citizens) have utterly no rights when it comes to what the government wants to do to you

Quote:And LB:

Quote:Originally Posted by Eyrie [Image: viewpost.gif]

Is this the AOPA that was crowing about medical "reform" having been achieved.?
There has been zero, zilch, zip, nada, gar nichts, in the way of meaningful medical reform of the Class 2 in Australia. NONE. Just a very small re-organisation of CASA's administration thereof leaving Australia way out of step with the USA and the UK.
<snip>.


I agree with you, except for the bit I snipped.

On medical certification ‘reform’ AOPA suffered an embarrassing episode of what doctors call ‘premature congratulation’. Have a look at the conditions on the instrument of delegation here: https://www.casa.gov.au/file/199061/...token=sWAvultt

Effectively, the DAME’s clinical opinion is dictated by CASA. Then there’s all the scary stuff about professional indemnity insurance. And here https://www.casa.gov.au/standard-pag...ter-april-2018 the PMO says: “This authorisation is provided under CASA delegation CASA 26/18. Please make sure you read all the conditions and understand your obligations in relation to exercising this delegation (it is important to note that although you will be a delegate of CASA, you are not indemnified by us.” [bolding added]

Amazing the PMO didn’t mention CAAP Admin 1 here: https://www.casa.gov.au/file/104516/...token=2TL92Ahp that says, at page 5, that CASA will indemnify non-CASA delegates.

Quote:And fm the Chairman:



Quote:And the sad fact is that not only is the Australian aviation industry (all of it, not just GA) commercially debilitated, but despite delusional claims to the contrary, as a result we have an inferior air safety outcome, compared to the USA.
Quote:Effectively, the DAME’s clinical opinion is dictated by CASA. Then there’s all the scary stuff about professional indemnity insurance. And here https://www.casa.gov.au/standard-pag...ter-april-2018 the PMO says: “This authorisation is provided under CASA delegation CASA 26/18. Please make sure you read all the conditions and understand your obligations in relation to exercising this delegation (it is important to note that although you will be a delegate of CASA, you are not indemnified by us.” [bolding added]


Amazing the PMO didn’t mention CAAP Admin 1 here: https://www.casa.gov.au/file/104516/...token=2TL92Ahpthat says, at page 5, that CASA will indemnify non-CASA delegates.

If what I read is true, then maybe a headline working approach could be:
CASA FAILURE - INDUSTRY IN CRISIS. DESPITE MASSIVE NEW REGULATIONS - SAFETY FOR AUSTRALIAN GENERAL AVIATION IS NOW INFERIOR COMPARED TO OTHER COUNTRIES - PARLIAMENT ACTION NEEDED NOW.
Might get some action. Will definitely get a RE-action. Pauline will probably be on side.
Anyway, AOPA is the best option us small (and lots of bigger) guys have.

Quote:Finally back to the wren... Wink 

Independent instructors are a necessity

Quote:
Quote:Originally Posted by Horatio Leafblower [Image: viewpost.gif]

Thanks Outnabout,
That's my question too.
Every time I speak to Ben Morgan he talks about Freelance flight instructors (will kill small flying schools, not big ones) and private Ride Share for PPLs in the UK (will hurt small charter organisations, not airlines or big charter orgs like Fly Corporate).

AOPA's approach has kicked the door down. Now that we're inside, I just hope we aren't wearing a suicide explosive belt [Image: cwm13.gif]

As one who ran my own school from the ‘70s for about 25 years I would agree with Ben Morgan’s call for independent instructors. ”Freelance” or independent instructors will not kill small flying schools they will create them. The last few small GA schools will mostly be gone by the time of transition deadline August. Where there used to be schools in hundreds of country towns there are now practically none, you can’t kill them twice. 

No healthy training industry equals the death of GA. Call them independent or instructing without the totally unworkable AOC dog’s breakfast, including the super costly paperwork nightmare that is the latest flying school regime, either way it must change. A senior instructor near me had to put up $8000 just to start a school application. Two years later still nothing. In the US where 70% are trained by independent instructors, the instructor mentioned would have been training from day One.

Without pilots the cake shrinks to nothing, more pilots equals more cake to go around. Any of the few schools left will be busy training instructors to go out into the regions. In turn they need aircraft, maintenance, fuel etc. 

In the past flying schools have baulked at the idea of the independent instructor for a short sighted fear of losing business, and CASA hated the idea of losing fees and power. I think most schools now would be less enthusiastic for that argument. In any case its up to government to do what is right for Australian aviation irrespective of sectional interest. 

PPL cost sharing we had for years, for private ops up to 6 place aircraft. Small charter operators? Nearly all gone like the GA flying schools. Charter AOCs are nearly as impossible as is the regime for flying schools. A local Ag pilot with his own light twin thought to offer charter only to be told by his CASA FOI “don’t bother it’s all too hard.”

We have a very sick system, the fee gouging salary factory will not go down without a serious fight. They will gull the unwary with ploys and inducements, they will slow, stall or move at a creeping pace. They will whisper in the Minister’s ear all sorts of dire consequences and distortions, the MO ably put by Sunfish in this string. 


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#16
Dick Smith on the Alan Jones Breakfast Show - 30 May 2018:

Quote:Dick Smith warns about China buying Aussie pilot schools

16 HOURS AGO

ALAN JONES
 
CASADICK SMITH

[Image: Dick.jpg]
Aviation expert Dick Smith says the Civil Aviation Safety Authority’s red tape is to blame for a serious shortage of commercial pilots.

The number of pilots Australia produces is falling, from about 1,700 licences issued annually a decade ago, to 1,200 last year.

The former CASA Chairman tells Alan Jones China has been buying up Australian flight training schools to address the boom in the Asian aviation industry.

“I went flying in a helicopter out towards Broken Hill last week and all you hear in the air is the Chinese students practising their English, giving position reports.

“Good on them, but I just think it’s ridiculous. Surely we should be providing pilots for the world. We’ll buy our electronics from China, we should supply pilots.”

Boeing warns the world will need to produce 640,000 pilots over the next 20 years.

Dick Smith tells Alan laws must be changed if those pilots are going to come from Australia.

“It’s going to be cheaper for the major airlines.

“Now I know Qantas and Virgin would like to have Aussie pilots, but if they’re allowed to import them – which they’ll have to if we don’t have pilots – they’ll come in on a visa, after two years they’ll stay forever and there’s no training costs.

Click PLAY below for the full interview


[Image: image.jpg?t=1511479058&size=Small]

The Alan Jones Breakfast Show


https://omny.fm/shows/the-alan-jones-bre...le=artwork

Dick Smith - Chinese buying up Australian flight schools

07:58


MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
#17
Dick Smith & AJ team up on Jones & CO

Can't get the full podcast yet but tonight Dick Smith featured on SkyNews' Jones & Co... Wink 

Via SkyNews twitter feed:


Quote:Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith says unless you're a son or daughter of a wealthy family - you cannot learn to fly.

'The costs have been going up and the flying training has dropped.'

MORE: https://bit.ly/2BuFqi1   #jonesandco




1,074 views

Video
@SkyNewsAust

8:45 PM - 5 Jun 2018




Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith says the reason Australian aviation schools are going broke and selling to the Chinese is due to excessive CASA regulation.

MORE: https://bit.ly/2BuFqi1  #jonesandco



1,295 views

Video
@SkyNewsAust



Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith: There's virtually no one being trained in safety maintenance in Australia; presumably they'll fly the planes overseas to get serviced.

MORE: https://bit.ly/2BuFqi1    #jonesandco



968 views

Video
@SkyNewsAust


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#18
Update: With podcast - Wink

(06-05-2018, 10:02 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Dick Smith & AJ team up on Jones & CO

Can't get the full podcast yet but tonight Dick Smith featured on SkyNews' Jones & Co... Wink 

Via SkyNews twitter feed:


Quote:Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith says unless you're a son or daughter of a wealthy family - you cannot learn to fly.

'The costs have been going up and the flying training has dropped.'

MORE: https://bit.ly/2BuFqi1   #jonesandco




1,074 views

Video
@SkyNewsAust

8:45 PM - 5 Jun 2018




Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith says the reason Australian aviation schools are going broke and selling to the Chinese is due to excessive CASA regulation.

MORE: https://bit.ly/2BuFqi1  #jonesandco



1,295 views

Video
@SkyNewsAust



Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith: There's virtually no one being trained in safety maintenance in Australia; presumably they'll fly the planes overseas to get serviced.

MORE: https://bit.ly/2BuFqi1    #jonesandco



968 views

Video
@SkyNewsAust

Podcast link: Tuesday-5th-June Jones & co - Dick Smith

Note: Starts from about 18 minutes

MTF...P2 Cool
Reply
#19
Dick Smith, Alan Jones and the lady who should be the next PM.


Podcast link: Tuesday-5th-June Jones & co - Dick Smith

Note: Starts from about 18 minutes
Reply
#20
Reform Plate – Form guide.

Well; as stated, I’m going to wish I’d never started this ain’t I. One of my small problems is the accidental punter – every big race attracts folk who have never, ever been to a race course, let alone had a wee flutter; but, an important race, like the Reform Plate brings ‘em out, by the bus load. One of the most often asked questions is why is GD stood on a box behind the tote board, wearing white gloves and waving his hands about like a demented  octopus?  Explanation follows directly:-





Recap – “There is still a while to wait for all the entries to arrive; race day is approaching so there will be an update from track side following soon. This outing promises to be a strange, but interesting affair. Always is when the rules are unclear, subject to ministerial whim and his ‘advice’. The long and bloody history of the Reform plate is the stuff of myth and legend. Many a sound, solid, honest entrant has been carted off the Knackers yard, damaged beyond hope of repair after this event. If you thought that chariot races in the Roman arenas were a brutal, bloody affair – then as my American friends say – Buddy, Ya ain’t seen nuttin’ yet.”

Early entries: - HERE.

Latest entries:-

As race day approaches, just before the cut off date, we will see the last minute runners. To a Bookie, this is always a problem; the proverbial dark horse and the odd ring-in turning up at ten to midnight, slipping the paper work under the door with the entry fee – all legal of course. So, we are never sure of the final line up until the ‘official’ programme is published. No matter, we shall do what we can, with what we have confirmed.

Nice and Easy: Horse; out of Labor in Vain by Stopped Short. The odds are shortening by the day on this quality entry, a strong runner in almost any conditions and big enough to withstand the on track rough and tumble. It is going to be lack of on track support which makes setting the odds difficult. As you may have gathered, this is a difficult race for the unaligned entry and often, those with no chance of a win out of sheer spite will ‘interfere’ with a straight run. I’ve set the board for value at each way 4/1 win or place. Caution; if this entry teams up with some of the better entries, it may well end with  the more fancied runners spread against the barriers; and, given a clear look at the finish line; there could be an upset win. MTF as the field firms.

Visiting Fireman; Gelding; by Welcome Stranger out of Far Away. One of an expected contingent from off shore interests. These will be interesting entries as winning is not a priority for these expert support runners. Their connections are appalled at the shocking lack of real rules attending this event and have determined to send at least two real champion runners to assist in the melee. 40/1 the win, 20/1 the place – bet 5 to win two for the best support effort.

City Express: Mare; out of Virgin Bride by Odd Duck. Impossible to set odds as it is unclear whether the big end of town connection are interested in the event. Should they decide that the game is worth the candle and see some dollar value in winning, then we may yet see them enter. A bookies nightmare if they do, their combined resources and on track power could see a clear team win – we shall see; MTF as P2 would say….

Unholy Union: Gelding; out of Loggerheads by Make a Deal. This stable has, in past events produced some first class entries to big races. That said, there is never any certainty that they will field an entry. Should the connections see an advantage to weighing in behind industry runners, they could tip the balance against the odds of an establishment win. This is just one of the last minute, midnight entries which create headaches for poor old Bookmakers. No help for it, just have wait and see on the day.

Miniscule Mike: Gelding; out of Confounded by Clueless. Totally owned and operated by establishment interests. The connections of this expensive, cosseted entry have used all manner of hoodoo and a little voodoo to ensure that animal is completely biddable and utterly reliable whenever they decide to race. The horse is totally useless on its own; but with the support entries creating havoc ahead, all it needs to do is amble around behind the pack, step around the carnage and stroll home. We have seen races finish where MM has been half a furlong behind the running while his team mates have pulled up to a dead stop four strides before the tape to allow MM to take the Plate and steal the glory, while the carcasses are being dragged off to the knackers yard. Bet 20 to win one the place.

That’s about it from the Bookies cave; more to follow as a clearer picture emerges from the smoke and mirrors. Did you ever go to a race track and have a punt? Take moment to get ‘the vibe’.





Toot toot.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)