Dick Smith – Master Orator.
#21
One for the Wagga Summit agendaRolleyes

On behalf of the flight instructor/flight school fraternity - Sandy with correspondence to his local member Sarah Henderson MP  Wink


Quote:Dear Sarah,


GA is in a down spiral and is in urgent need of Government action. Flying training is fundamental to industry health. The attached table illustrates, with conservative numbers, extraordinary new and costly imposts to flying schools and instructors. 

This informative tabular presentation, by the principal and Chief Flying Instructor (CFI) of a respected major flying school, illustrates just one area of concern. As a former CFI and aircraft owner operator, I can attest that the new rules will accomplish nothing except to accelerate the killing of GA in Australia. 

The present rules and administration are bad enough and have resulted in a dearth of pilots and the importation of foreign pilots to fly our airlines. This is a complete reversal of the situation that obtained before the bureaucratic ‘control freak’ mentality took hold, around 20 years ago, with ever more rigid, counterproductive and costly micro management.  

The current system with its myriad of complex rules, inappropriately cast as criminal law of strict liability, is about to be made even worse. It flies in the face of commonsense, let alone the Coalition’s mantra of “jobs and growth.” There are ‘criminal’ offences, with huge penalties, in our aviation law that don’t even get a mention in the USA because they are not deserving or recognised as requiring regulation at all. 

Please advise the Minister for Infrastructure that the proposed (Dick Smith and GA industry) amendments to the Civil Aviation Act, requiring CASA to have regard to the health of the aviation industry, is a necessary first step towards halting the decline of this important industry. 

Kind regards,

Sandy 




[Image: CAR5-v-Part-61.jpg]


Perhaps someone could strike this up as an agenda item at the WAS -  Huh


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#22
AMROBA Wagga Summit Position PaperWink

Via the latest AMROBA Newsletter: Volume 15 Issue 6 (June)

Quote:[Image: AMROBA-1.jpg]

[Image: AMROBA-2.jpg]

As usual KC nails it - top job mate!  Big Grin


MTF...P2  Tongue

(Ps And the chocfrog is in the mail... Wink )
Reply
#23
LOTW: Dear Shane - AOPA letter to CC Wink

In the lead up to the Wagga summit I have to award BM & AOPA Oz a packet of TimTams for the following correspondence to DAS Carmody: https://www.facebook.com/AOPAaustralia/p...8027878786

Quote:AOPA AUSTRALIA SUPPORTS CTA AND 601-760KG MTOW WEIGHT LIMIT INCREASE FOR RAAUS RECREATIONAL PILOT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS

26th June 2018

Mr Carmody,

Further to your Briefing Notes of 26th June 2018, distributed by email to the aviation industry.

Your announcements this week regarding CTA access and an MTOW increase of 601-760KGS for Recreational Pilots Certificate holders is viewed as excellent news for Australia’s aviation industry.

By way of your announcement you have communicated CASA’s acceptance, that a private drivers license self-certification medical standard for pilots of aircraft with an MTOW of up to 600kg currently represents ‘no reduction in the existing safety standards’. This view aligns with the view of the AOPA Australia who has been advocating for Class 2 reforms.

We are furthermore encouraged that CASA is reviewing an MTOW increase of 601-760KG for Recreational Pilots Certificate holders signaling that the regulator's decision in December 2017 to reject self-certification for general aviation RPL and PPL holders was premature.

Understanding that CASA’s role is to develop aviation safety standards for the whole of our industry, we applaud CASA in making this decision and now look forward to its implementation for RPL and PPL holders who fly private category VH registered aircraft with an MTOW of up to 600kgs and onwards to 601-760KGS once CASA approves.

CASA must agree that it would be entirely inappropriate for it to discriminate between an RAAus RPC holder or CASA RPL/PPL holder, given that you have stated ‘no reduction in the existing safety standards’ exits. Furthermore, you are aware that CASA sets a higher standard of pilot training for both RPL and PPL holders, along with higher airworthiness standards for VH registered aircraft than what is applied to RAAus.

We would also like to convey our full support for owner maintenance for all private category VH registered aircraft with an MTOW of up to 600KGS and onward to 601-760KGS on the basis of your Briefing Notes of 26th June 2018.

The AOPA Australia requests an urgent meeting with you and your team next week to discuss a timeline for immediate implementation.

Thank you again and we look forward to meeting soon.

Yours Sincerely,

BENJAMIN MORGAN
Executive Director - AOPA Australia


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#24
(06-25-2018, 09:48 PM)Peetwo Wrote: AMROBA Wagga Summit Position PaperWink

Via the latest AMROBA Newsletter: Volume 15 Issue 6 (June)

Quote:[Image: AMROBA-1.jpg]

[Image: AMROBA-2.jpg]

KC with a Breaking News follow up:

Quote:[Image: Act-Changes.jpg][img=565x0]https://amroba.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Act-Changes.jpg[/img]

Breaking News 
Federal Aviation Acts Changes 6-18
Need for Acts Reviews

[img=100x0]https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/bcf30f1497fba75955ccb70ff3a6e364?s=100&d=mm&r=g[/img]
Ken Cannane
Executive Director





[Image: AMROBA-BN1.jpg]
[Image: AMROBA-BN2.jpg]
[Image: AMROBA-BN3.jpg]
[Image: AMROBA-BN4.jpg]
[Image: AMROBA-BN5.jpg]
[Image: AMROBA-BN6.jpg]


Busy couple of weeks coming up for the AGAA I reckon - GOOD LUCK ALL!  Wink



MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
#25
Agenda/Program for Wagga Summit. 

Via AOPA Oz on twitter this evening... Wink

Quote:GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018
9TH & 10TH JULY

The Australian General Aviation Alliance welcomes the 34 general aviation industry associations and 75 representatives who have confirmed their attendance to the General...
https://aopa.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/PROGRAMME.pdf 




[Image: Wagga-Summit.jpg]


MTF...P2 Tongue
Reply
#26
Hitch catching up Big Grin

Via Oz Flying:
Quote:[Image: AGAA_web.jpg]AOPA, SAAA and AMROBA are the three founding members of the Australian General Aviation Alliance (AGAA) (composite image Diamond Aircraft / Steve Hitchen)

Support for a change to the Civil Aviation Act is growing rapidly ahead of next week's Australian General Aviation Alliance (AGAA) summit in Wagga Wagga.

Industry associations are working together to try to have the Civil Aviation Act 1988 changed to remove safety as the primary consideration and force the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) to take into account the economic impact of regulation.
In a summit update released on 2 July, AGAA said that 34 associations representing 26,500 members had confirmed they would attend the summit next Monday and Tuesday.

The associations will be asked to evaluate new wording for the Act, which has been proposed to include:
In exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must seek to achieve the highest level of safety in air navigation as well as:
  • maintaining an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector
  • the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation.

Most of the attending associations have indicated broad support for change in position papers submitted to AGAA, citing many factors from a flagging training industry to costs imposed by heavy regulation.

The International Comanche Society of Australasia (ICS) says a change to the Act is needed to spur growth in the general aviation industry.

"The ICS supports a change to the Civil Aviation Act as a first step to rejuvenating our industry. We believe that regulatory costs and complexity have made it difficult for the private owner. We also believe that these same problems are affecting our maintenance and avionics organisations and a further demise in this sector will adversely affect all aircraft owners. The ICS also sees adverse effects occurring in the flying training sector.

The Australian Licensed Aircraft Engineers Association (ALAEA) said in their position paper:
"For Australian aviation to prosper in today’s world it requires the industry and the government to work together towards identifying opportunities to grow and for the regulator to be an active participant in assisting industry to access those opportunities.The current act has no provision for this."

"The level of over regulation and complexity has a devastating impact on private aviation participation," says the Cirrus Owner Pilots Association (COPA). "The Cessna SIDS and ADS-B mandates are examples. There was no safety case for SIDS, and the ADS-B mandate should have applied to all aircraft but not until two years after the USA. The non-TSO local options should have been approved for use below 18,000 ft."

Several associations, including Recreational Aviation Australia (RAAus) and the Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) have indicated in-principle support, but reserved their position until the proposed changes are clearer.

"RAAus is supportive of constructive, realistic strategies," RAAus said, "however, without understanding the detail of the proposed changes we are not willing to commit to a position."

As well as the associations, several members of parliament and general aviation influencers are slated to attend, including Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormick, Shadow Minister for Transport Anthony Albanese, Mayor of Wagga Wagga Greg Conkey, International Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Secretary General Craig Spence and Senate Standing Committee on Regional and Rural Affairs and Transport (RRAT) secretary Jane Thompson.

The summit will run over two days from 9-10 July and will be chaired by former REX Managing Director Geoff Breust.


Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...YKllXOE.99


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
#27
iAOPA SecGen speaks out in lead up to Wagga Summit Wink  


From Robyn Ironside, via the Oz yesterday:

Quote:Aviation chief Craig Spence jets in to lobby for less red tape
[Image: dbe5d331168c2a388b0353201494fbec?width=650]
Craig Spence, secretary-general of the International Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.
  • The Australian

  • 12:00AM July 5, 20181
  • ROBYN IRONSIDE
    [Image: robyn_ironside.png]
    Property Writer
    Brisbane
    @ironsider
    The head of the world’s most powerful aviation lobby group will visit Australia next week to try to convince the federal government of the need for legislative changes to ease the cost of complying with overzealous safety regulations on the general aviation community.

    The International Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association has 79 affiliate organisations representing more than 400,000 ­pilots worldwide.

    Association secretary-general Craig Spence, who also heads the US Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, said the aviation industry was not suited to a “one-size-fits-all” approach to regula­tion such as that being adopted in Australia.

    He likened the present approach to imposing the same compliance regulations expected of a professional truck driver on a private car owner or motorcyclist.

    “We’ve worked on similar projects as this in Europe, where they realised they were in fact killing the general aviation industry by regulating it in the same way as commercial aviation,” Mr Spence said. “They’re four years down the deregulation path now and everyone seems to have benefited, and I’m hoping to bring some of those lessons learned to the current situation in Australia.”

    Mr Spence will address next week’s General Aviation Summit in Wagga Wagga, NSW, being opened by Infrastructure and Transport Minister Michael McCormack. The summit was organised to demonstrate con­sensus among stakeholders for proposed changes to the Civil Aviation Act.

    These include recognising that a viable general aviation and training sector is as important as the safety of air navigation.

    AOPA Australia executive ­director Benjamin Morgan said they were not asking for safety to be watered down; rather, that unnecessary red tape imposed in the name of safety be removed.

    “Any logical thinking individual would understand that if a business can’t afford to operate in the market, it’s questionable as to what level of safety is actually achieved,” Mr Morgan said.

    “Most participants in the aviation industry understand that safety is born through education and awareness; it’s not born from ­policing, surveillance and ­enforcement.”

    Mr Spence said an important part of deregulation was handing some control back to the general aviation community, in recognition of their personal interest in safety. “There’s a regulated level of risk (in aviation) and depending on how close you are to the control and operations, the more you have to alleviate the risk,” he said.

    CASA spokesman Peter Gibson said any changes to the Civil Aviation Act were a matter for the government. But he rejected the assertion the present legal framework took a “cookie cutter ­approach” to aviation.

    “Major reforms have been made to the aviation medical system which reduce red tape and provide flexibility to general aviation pilots,” Mr Gibson said. “CASA is also actively looking at regulatory support for new affordable technology that will support safer general aviation flying.”
  • MTF...P2  Cool
  • Reply
    #28
    Gob-shite  - “Major reforms have been made to the aviation medical system which reduce red tape and provide flexibility to general aviation pilots,” Mr Gibson said. “CASA is also actively looking at regulatory support for new affordable technology that will support safer general aviation flying.”

    It is a thing of wonder to me just how blind and disinterested the media can be. It also fascinates me to think a journo can be reproducing Gibson’s dribble, while there is a ‘red-hot’ whisper doing the rounds – all 'top secret' of course; except, everyone (bar the press) knows.

    FWIW – here is the latest gossip. Seems that there has been a showdown – if true, then the CASA CEO has earned not only a Choc Frog and a gold star today, but a large chunk of respect. It seems, so scurrilous gossip has it: the PMO would not have a bar of the proposed changes to some medical standards for pilots – CEO Carmody declared that the changes would be made. “Well I’ll quit” says the PMO (much miffed) – “OK” says the CASA boss. Appears there is now a vacancy at the top of Avmed; perhaps a sensible, competent pair of hands can don the dreaded rubber gloves and do what is required. Peter Clem is such a man – I wonder, I just wonder if perhaps, maybe; there is a change in the wind. Is Carmody the windsock? Faithfully representing the ministerial wind – as it breaks.  MTF -? Or not. We shall see

    “Silly question my dear – you must be new; even so, that glass is less than half full which, IMO, is a terrible, drained thing full of air”.  Cheers- you bet.

    [Image: Untitled%2B2.jpg]
    Reply
    #29
    Two packets of Tim Tams being dispatched to Ben Morgan

    Ben Morgan absolutely nails the ethos of our industry;

    “Most participants in the aviation industry understand that safety is born through education and awareness; it’s not born from ­policing, surveillance and ­enforcement.”

    If only the farkwitted Politicans and their Iron Ring catamites could grasp that concept. And as for that bearded fool Gibson, what a creep. Just another spin doctor paid to speaketh with forked tongue. The public are gullible and so easy to fool.

    Good luck Mr Spence, you’re up against Magicians and cauldrons.
    Reply
    #30
     

    [Image: Chicken-Little-Wallpapers-chicken-little...0-1024.jpg]   

    Hitch in anticipation of Wagga Summit... Rolleyes

    Via this week's LMH Dodgy :

    Quote:...Enabling legislation for Basic Class 2 medical has a sting in the tail: we have to tell passengers that we are flying to a lower medical standard. This brings reminders of the Jabiru engine restrictions when similar demands were made of aircraft owners. The problem as I see it is that it can do nothing but put the frighteners on passengers who didn't know the pilot was subject to a medical standard in the first place. One thing I try to never do is scare people with an aeroplane, and I suspect not even CASA would think that a good idea. The requirement probably stems from the regulator's desire to protect the general public from perceived risk, but in demanding we tell passengers that we're on a lower medical standard is the equivalent of demanding we tell them we're not as safe. Personally, I don't think this is the case at all. It does make me wonder (again) if CASA believes aviation is inherently a dangerous thing to do.

    Quote:you need to be a very good political animal or you get re-branded 'collateral damage'

    Fun and games are on early next week in Wagga Wagga. The AGAA general aviation summit has managed to attract most of the associations and lobby groups within the community as well as some high-ranking politicians. Inevitably, the politics from the floor has already started well before the opening coffee session. There is a lot at stake here: representatives of both the government and the opposition are saying they will back a change to the Civil Aviation Act 1988, but are asking for consensus from the industry before they take any action. Consequently, those who would seek to influence the change according to their own policies are manoeuvring to get their position best heard. All that's natural, unfortunately; when you get involved in politics you need to be a very good political animal or you get re-branded "collateral damage". As someone who has been bleating about the need for consensus within the industry since I wrote my first ever blog, my largest fear is that this summit will be sidelined by politics and not-so-hidden agendas that will swamp the idea of getting the Act changed and do nothing but demonstrate to the government that we just can't work together. If that happens, federal governments to the end of days will use it as an excuse to do nothing. I seriously hope I am wrong about this.

    Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...bfDwLi0.99

    Considering Hitch has been cowering over in the EU for the last month and only 2 days ago  was seemingly shamed into actually mentioning the Wagga Summit, one has to be concerned for the future of Australia's once premier GA magazine? Anyway, a timely counterpoint to that load of codswallop comes in the form of Sandy... Wink


    Sandy Reith • 11 hours ago

    Hitch; right on the ball re political manoeuvring that will be part and parcel of the Wagga event, against a background of serious resistance from the bureaucratic machine which has much to lose. All those highly paid jobs and Wintertime seminars away from freezing Can’tberra, mostly in QLD, and Northern hemisphere summertime conferences. 


    Insofar as the ephemeral “consensus” is concerned, may I suggest that this word can evoke various degrees of relevance depending on individual disposition. One could never, realistically, expect everyone to agree completely so lets look at how Australia deals with this governance issue in the No. 1. arena of politics, where it counts most to aviators, the Parliament of Australia. Here 51% is sufficient to resolve ways of living and enshrine in law the will of the people. Is this consensus? Does it matter? It depends on your viewpoint. Democracy works by resolving conflicting interests. One main principle is that the will of the majority should not impinge on the rights and freedoms of minorities. This goes to our freedoms, one of those is to fly without a myriad of unnecessary costs and impractical rules. 


    We should aim to impress Minister MacCormack that action is necessary and urgent.






    MTF...P2  Cool


    ps If nothing else this week's LMH - combined with the dot's & dashes posts (see - Wagga Summit - Let's not do the 'timewarp again'.) - will have industry participants properly forewarned in the lead up to the Wagga summit. However Sandy also wanted to contribute to the 'eyes wide open' brief and to remind me that the bureaucratic embuggerance of the GA industry has been ongoing for a lot longer than a mere decade... Big Grin 


    Quote:[Image: IMG_2317.jpg]

    [Image: IMG-2292.jpg]
    Reply
    #31
    The 1989 “CAA” letter of promise is kept above my office desk as a reminder to myself and guests that governments cannot be trusted to keep their words. That is why at times they must be changed, why we citizens must work voluntarily to urge reform, why we use the ballot box, and why the press and publicity are essential.

    After 10 years of one step forward (adoption of US Parts 23-35) and many backwards, the 1999 further promise by Dr. Scully-Power that reform is in the offing gives important perspective and goes to the truism that if we do not study history then we are more likely to repeat it.

    So here we are 29 years after my CASA-CAA letter when even the government’s own statistics show considerable decline and the GA industry is up in arms, as never before, over the bureaucratic destruction of a valuable industry. A huge failure, the independent regulator, the statutory authority, separated from direct Ministerial control. An experiment of governance that should be truncated as soon as possible.
    Reply
    #32
    (07-07-2018, 08:42 AM)Peetwo Wrote:  

    [Image: Chicken-Little-Wallpapers-chicken-little...0-1024.jpg]   

    Hitch in anticipation of Wagga Summit... Rolleyes

    Via this week's LMH Dodgy :

    Quote:...Enabling legislation for Basic Class 2 medical has a sting in the tail: we have to tell passengers that we are flying to a lower medical standard. This brings reminders of the Jabiru engine restrictions when similar demands were made of aircraft owners. The problem as I see it is that it can do nothing but put the frighteners on passengers who didn't know the pilot was subject to a medical standard in the first place. One thing I try to never do is scare people with an aeroplane, and I suspect not even CASA would think that a good idea. The requirement probably stems from the regulator's desire to protect the general public from perceived risk, but in demanding we tell passengers that we're on a lower medical standard is the equivalent of demanding we tell them we're not as safe. Personally, I don't think this is the case at all. It does make me wonder (again) if CASA believes aviation is inherently a dangerous thing to do.

    Quote:you need to be a very good political animal or you get re-branded 'collateral damage'

    Fun and games are on early next week in Wagga Wagga. The AGAA general aviation summit has managed to attract most of the associations and lobby groups within the community as well as some high-ranking politicians. Inevitably, the politics from the floor has already started well before the opening coffee session. There is a lot at stake here: representatives of both the government and the opposition are saying they will back a change to the Civil Aviation Act 1988, but are asking for consensus from the industry before they take any action. Consequently, those who would seek to influence the change according to their own policies are manoeuvring to get their position best heard. All that's natural, unfortunately; when you get involved in politics you need to be a very good political animal or you get re-branded "collateral damage". As someone who has been bleating about the need for consensus within the industry since I wrote my first ever blog, my largest fear is that this summit will be sidelined by politics and not-so-hidden agendas that will swamp the idea of getting the Act changed and do nothing but demonstrate to the government that we just can't work together. If that happens, federal governments to the end of days will use it as an excuse to do nothing. I seriously hope I am wrong about this.

    Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...bfDwLi0.99

    Considering Hitch has been cowering over in the EU for the last month and only 2 days ago  was seemingly shamed into actually mentioning the Wagga Summit, one has to be concerned for the future of Australia's once premier GA magazine? Anyway, a timely counterpoint to that load of codswallop comes in the form of Sandy... Wink


    Sandy Reith • 11 hours ago

    Hitch; right on the ball re political manoeuvring that will be part and parcel of the Wagga event, against a background of serious resistance from the bureaucratic machine which has much to lose. All those highly paid jobs and Wintertime seminars away from freezing Can’tberra, mostly in QLD, and Northern hemisphere summertime conferences. 


    Insofar as the ephemeral “consensus” is concerned, may I suggest that this word can evoke various degrees of relevance depending on individual disposition. One could never, realistically, expect everyone to agree completely so lets look at how Australia deals with this governance issue in the No. 1. arena of politics, where it counts most to aviators, the Parliament of Australia. Here 51% is sufficient to resolve ways of living and enshrine in law the will of the people. Is this consensus? Does it matter? It depends on your viewpoint. Democracy works by resolving conflicting interests. One main principle is that the will of the majority should not impinge on the rights and freedoms of minorities. This goes to our freedoms, one of those is to fly without a myriad of unnecessary costs and impractical rules. 


    We should aim to impress Minister MacCormack that action is necessary and urgent.






    MTF...P2  Cool


    ps If nothing else this week's LMH - combined with the dot's & dashes posts (see - Wagga Summit - Let's not do the 'timewarp again'.) - will have industry participants properly forewarned in the lead up to the Wagga summit. However Sandy also wanted to contribute to the 'eyes wide open' brief and to remind me that the bureaucratic embuggerance of the GA industry has been ongoing for a lot longer than a mere decade... Big Grin 


    Quote:[Image: IMG_2317.jpg]

    [Image: IMG-2292.jpg]

    Sandy:

    Quote:The 1989 “CAA” letter of promise is kept above my office desk as a reminder to myself and guests that governments cannot be trusted to keep their words. That is why at times they must be changed, why we citizens must work voluntarily to urge reform, why we use the ballot box, and why the press and publicity are essential. 

    After 10 years of one step forward (adoption of US Parts 23-35) and many backwards, the 1999 further promise by Dr. Scully-Power that reform is in the offing gives important perspective and goes to the truism that if we do not study history then we are more likely to repeat it. 

    So here we are 29 years after my CASA-CAA letter when even the government’s own statistics show considerable decline and the GA industry is up in arms, as never before, over the bureaucratic destruction of a valuable industry. A huge failure, the independent regulator, the statutory authority, separated from direct Ministerial control. An experiment of governance that should be truncated as soon as possible.

    Via the Weekend Oz:

    Less red tape for general aviation
    [Image: df7e44dde7d7c5f2630ee64fe6a8222a]ANNABEL HEPWORTH

    New maintenance rules for the under-pressure general aviation sector will be modelled on the best of leading systems such as the American model, Australia’s aviation safety regulator says.

    Ahead of a landmark general aviation summit in Wagga Wagga next week, The Weekend Australiancan reveal Infrastructure and Transport Minister ­Michael McCormack will announce today that the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has started work on the regulations with a stated ­objective of reducing costs and easing the burden of red tape.

    The move comes as leaders from major aviation groups prepare to descend on Wagga Wagga, in Mr McCormack’s Riverina electorate, to convince the government to make legislative changes to ease the cost of complying with what they consider excessive regulations.

    A new set of maintenance regulations would be tailored to the general aviation industry, which has shrunk significantly since 2010 and complained of being throttled by red tape.

    CASA boss Shane Carmody said these would be based as much as they could be on the best practices of “leading” aviation ­nations such as the United States.

    General aviation provides connections to areas not serviced by airlines and plays a key role in servicing regional communities.

    “CASA is also working on improvements to the regulations covering maintenance personnel, licensing and aircraft design and manufacturing,” Mr Carmody said.

    Maintenance is a major cost for general aviation aircraft operators. Last year, a landmark study found the maintenance of an ageing aircraft fleet and the cost of maintenance training were among “key challenges” facing the once-vibrant sector.

    The sector has argued that aligning the maintenance rules with the US would provide cost savings without reducing safety.

    Aircraft Maintenance Repair and Overhaul Business Association director Ken Cannane said his group wanted to see the Federal Aviation Regulations system that governs activities in the US adopted to replace the “old, dated” systems here.

    “A lot of people in general aviation have actually been in the American system and worked under it and they actually know the benefits of it and how it works better,” Mr Cannane said.

    Mr McCormack said the government was also aware of concerns the flight-training sector had about regulations for the licensing of flight crew.

    The government and CASA would deliver “meaningful reforms for the benefit of general aviation while maintaining the high aviation safety standards demanded by all Australians”, Mr McCormack said.

    The Australian has run a series of reports revealing the costs and red tape that have struck flying schools, the greater foreign ­ownership of Australian training schools and concerns by figures including prominent businessman and aviator Dick Smith that layers of red tape are rendering Australia’s general aviation sector unviable.

    Reply
    #33
    WAKEY WAKEY HAND OFF SNAKEY

    Has Wingnut Carmody finally been pulled out of stasis? He admitted this;

    “CASA boss Shane Carmody said these would be based as much as they could be on the best practices of “leading” aviation ­nations such as the United States”.

    That’s right you muppet. We’ve been saying for the past 20 years at least that the Yanks and New Zulland have pretty much got it right. Yet during that same period of time our deluded Australian Government has sadly, and embarrassingly, conjured up the notion that Aus is the best! Ha ha ha.

    And of course the usual rhetoric and empty promises gets rolled out by Miniscule McDo’nothing;

    “Ahead of a landmark general aviation summit in Wagga Wagga next week. The Weekend Australiancan reveal Infrastructure and Transport Minister ­Michael McCormack will announce today that the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has started work on the regulations with a stated ­objective of reducing costs and easing the burden of red tape”.

    Blah blah blah fool. Same press release, same wording, just the date and Ministers name has changed. Presstitutes Peter Gobbed’off, Hitch sitting in the Ministers seat and that fool Steve Creepy would have a chubby.
    Reply
    #34
    Opening session: Minty shines; miniscule 4G is apparently genuine -  Dodgy





    2nd segment: Q&A session miniscule 4G; iCAO SecGen; & Ken Lewis: 





    Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





    Segments of note: 

    Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

    Mike Smith approx: -21:00 

    MTF...P2  Cool
    Reply
    #35
    (07-09-2018, 05:12 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Opening session: Minty shines; miniscule 4G is apparently genuine -  Dodgy





    2nd segment: Q&A session miniscule 4G; iCAO SecGen; & Ken Lewis: 





    Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





    Segments of note: 

    Lawrence Paratz,International Comanche Society of Australasia: approx: -1:47:00 (must watch -  Wink )

    Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

    Mike Smith approx: -21:00 

    Newsfeed, via WinNews... Wink





    Livefeed to Wagga Summit dinner:





    MTF...P2 Tongue
    Reply
    #36
    A wee gathering?

    What, no pics of the Miniscule taking a piss at the toilet trough? (Not to be confused with the taxpayer trough!)
    Then again, he probably does squat to take a piss......
    Reply
    #37
    (07-09-2018, 08:35 PM)Peetwo Wrote:
    (07-09-2018, 05:12 PM)Peetwo Wrote: Opening session: Minty shines; miniscule 4G is apparently genuine -  Dodgy





    2nd segment: Q&A session miniscule 4G; iCAO SecGen; & Ken Lewis: 





    Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





    Segments of note: 

    Lawrence Paratz,International Comanche Society of Australasia: approx: -1:47:00 (must watch -  Wink )

    Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

    Mike Smith approx: -21:00 

    Newsfeed, via WinNews... Wink





    Livefeed to Wagga Summit dinner:





    Prime7 news segment:






    Via Oz Flying:


    Quote:
    • [Image: michael_mccormack_web.jpg]Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack. (Steve Hitchen)
    McCormack promises Collaboration for GA
    10 July 2018
     
    Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack has said he will collaborate with reform attempts for general aviation, but added that getting any changes to the Civil Aviation Act through parliament could be difficult.

    Speaking to delegates and observers at the Australian General Aviation Alliance (AGAA) summit in Wagga Wagga yesterday, McCormack also said he looked forward to the outcomes of the summit.

    "I do want to work with you in a genuine collaborative, co-operative way to help general aviation.

    "I am in no doubt about the passion in the GA industry, and whilst this summit will highlight some of the challenges you are facing, that passion can be used to meet those challenges, and I look forward to receiving the summary at the end of your conference to see what we can do to help bring about the change that you desire."

    The aim of the summit is for the assembled associations to agree on changes to the Civil Aviation Act 1988 that are thought to be necessary for growth and survival of the general aviation industry. Such changes will need to pass through parliament, which McCormack highlighted would be difficult when the Liberal-National Party Coalition has a slender majority in the lower house.

    "The fact remains that any change has to be able to pass the parliament," McCormack said, "not always easy when you're in a one-seat majority in that particular parliament. When you're in a parliament when the government of the day does not have control of the senate."

    McCormack said he had been in contact with Shadow Minister for Infrastructure Transport Cities and Regional Developement Anthony Albanese, and both had agreed to do what they can to help general aviation.

    "I want to work in a bipartisan way to help all industries," McCormack added, "not just aviation, but indeed anything that we can do in the transport space, indeed in infrastructure to help bring about much needed benefits for our community.

    McCormack continued on to say that the requirement to take the cost impact into account in regulation was enshrined in the Statement of Expectations provided to CASA in March 2017.

    "These are not just words," he said, "the Statement of Expectations is a legislative instrument and I expect the board of CASA to ensure it's requirements are indeed met.

    "I can assure you I will work in partnership with our aviation agencies and the industry in tackling the challenges and opportunites for the GA sector."

    Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...iMCogBC.99

    Via Australian Aviation:

    Quote:Minister keen to listen as general aviation sector seeks reform
    written by australianaviation.com.au July 9, 2018

    [Image: PHAN8244.jpg]
    Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack says he is keen to listen to proposals for regulatory reform from Australia’s general aviation sector.

    Representatives from more than 30 industry associations have gathered in Wagga Wagga for a two-day Australian General Aviation Alliance (AGAA) general aviation summit, which kicked off on Monday.

    The AGAA has proposed changing the wording of the Civil Aviation Act, which currently as stated calls on Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) to “regard safety as the most important consideration” in its role regulating the industry.

    Instead, CASA would be charged with ensuring the “highest level of safety in air navigation” in addition to having consideration for “an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector” and “the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation”.

    Further, the AGAA proposal also called for the main object of the act to be to establish a regulatory framework for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the safety of civil aviation with particular emphasis on preventing aviation accidents and incidents.

    And the AGAA also wanted the Civil Aviation Act to recognise the “importance of having a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry, and of enabling more people to benefit from aviation”.

    The chairman of the general aviation summit Geoff Breust said in his welcome letter to delegates that there was “already consensus that the Civil Aviation Act required amendment”.

    “Indeed the view has been around for some years,” Breust said.

    “Our task is to agree on what that amendment should be – if not the actual words, the real intent to be covered in the wording.”

    Delegates were also expected to come up with a communique outlining reforms designed to lift the regulatory burden and lower costs for those working in the general aviation sector.

    McCormack said the federal government welcomed any suggestions that would improve Australia’s aviation safety legislative and regulatory framework.

    Further, the Minister encouraged all delegates to focus on proposals that were “likely to have a practical effect delivering tangible improvements to the challenges GA is facing”.

    “The government is working with you to deliver meaningful reforms for the benefit of general aviation while maintaining the high aviation safety standards demanded by all Australians,” McCormack told delegates in his speech.

    “I will continue to listen and carefully consider the issues raised by people in the general aviation sector, and the government and portfolio aviation agencies will respond appropriately.

    “I am keen to hear from you on the key issues you want tackled by government and industry that relate to GA operations in Australia.

    “As a former small business owner, a Minister for Small Business and editor of a regional newspaper here in Wagga, I am very conscious of the challenges faced by small business in Australia and the need to remove unnecessary costs and regulatory burden.”

    Airline Owners and Pilots Association of Australia (AOPA) executive director Benjamin Morgan said a change to the Civil Aviation Act and the adoption of rules from US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would help unlock the potential of this country’s general aviation sector and meet the demand of the airline industry.

    While some in the sector have been calling for genuine change for at least a decade, if not longer, Morgan said there was hope the current push would yield those sought after reforms.

    “Our industry has had plenty of demands over the years so we appreciate and we value the support that the Deputy Prime Minister has shown today,” Morgan told reporters on Monday.

    “I’m actually reasonably buoyed by the statements that have been made. I can see that there is a clear intent and what we are going to be working towards to make sure that that intent translates into action.

    “The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association will be working very hard to see to it that the Deputy Prime Minister honours his word and continues to work with this industry to provide a viable outcome because the reality is if we don’t achieve this we will see the general aviation industry collapse even further.

    “There is a large portion of our industry at risk.”

    AOPA has previously described the general aviation sector as “collapsing under the weight of regulation” and slowly dying.

    CASA reforms to be completed over the next year

    [Image: CASA-inspectors-crop.jpg]
    McCormack said in his speech Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) was committed to completing the aviation regulatory reform package over the next 12 months.

    In the meantime, there was ongoing work to improve the lot of those working in aviation, including general aviation.

    To that end, the Minister announced in his speech changes to indemnity insurance for flight examiners.

    “With effect from 1 September 2018, CASA indemnification will be provided to all Flight Examiner Rating holders and will continue for Approved Testing Officers,” McCormack told the summit.

    “This announcement follows the completion of a policy review and public consultation by the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities earlier this year.

    “This approach will help retain experienced industry flight testing personnel working in regional areas, I know this has been an issue that industry have been keen to see a resolution and I am glad that today we can announce the good news.”

    News of the resolution surrounding indemnity insurance followed an announcement from CASA on Saturday it had introduced a new category of private pilot medical certificate that aimed to simplify the process and reduce costs for private pilots flying piston engine aircraft with a maximum take-off weight of less than 8618kg.

    Further, operations were limited to below 10,000 feet in day visual flight rules conditions, with up to five non-fare-paying passengers.

    The new Basic Class 2 medical certificate means pilots can use their own general practitioner for aviation medical certification, then complete the process online for a $10 processing fee.

    This compared with having to visit a special aviation medical practitioner and pay a $75 processing fee under the previous arrangements.

    “The new Basic Class 2 medical certificate is safe, simple, fair and inexpensive,” CASA director of aviation safety and chief executive Shane Carmody said in a statement.

    “The medical certificate reforms made by CASA cut through unnecessary regulatory red tape and directly benefit many people in aviation, particularly those in general aviation.

    “This is tangible evidence that CASA is working successfully to reduce the regulatory burden on the aviation community while maintaining appropriate safety standards.”

    Further, McCormack said CASA had started work with the industry on the development of new general aviation maintenance regulations.

    “There will be a new set of maintenance regulations tailored specifically for general aviation, which will be based as far as possible on best practices in leading aviation nations, such as the United States,” McCormack said.

    “CASA is also working on improvements to the regulations covering maintenance personnel licensing and aircraft design and manufacturing.”


    Day Two - Wagga Summit.


    The Hon Anthony Albanese MP addressing the General Aviation Summit 2018

    [Image: 36849445_1301873026610286_17844532681774...e=5BD0F054]



    AOPA AUSTRALIA - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018 - DAY TWO WORKSHOPS

    [Image: 36872561_1301807639950158_23653715780588...e=5BD3F319]


    Outcomes/resolutions:

    Quote:[Image: 36831823_1302134429917479_37661849928293...e=5BA714ED]

    RESOLUTIONS - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018


    The General Aviation Summit has agreed to pass two resolutions which (1) sets out the principal findings of the summit with regard to the regulation of general aviation in Australia and (2) commits the industry to providing appropriate information and to make recommendations for action on reform as follows.

    1. The General Aviation Summit concluded:

    1.1 General Aviation wants to maintain or improve Australia’s aviation safety outcomes; 

    1.2 the General Aviation sector is of vital importance to Australia especially regional and rural Australia not only in economic terms but in social and community service provision terms;

    1.3 the General Aviation sector, including the commercial elements of the sector, is overburdened with the complexity and cost flowing from the current Civil Aviation Act, Regulations and other aviation legislation; 

    1.4 the current regulatory regime is based on a prescriptive approach to rules and compliance. World best practice is based on Outcome Based regulation which Australia should implement immediately in accordance with DAS Directive 01/2015 and the Minister’s CASA Statement of Expectations;

    1.5 the cost and complexity burdens placed on the General Aviation sector are exacerbated by the actions of Airservices and airport operators, both privatised and local government owned, by further cost impositions, operational restrictions and inappropriate infrastructure development; 

    1.6 the Australian economy has the opportunity to benefit from pilot and engineering training, aircraft and component maintenance and construction services flowing from the world-wide expansion of air travel and aviation activity – especially in Asia. To achieve this, we must be able to respond effectively and be liberated from over regulation; and

    1.7 the attitude must be to adopt best regulatory practices in parallel with embracing safety and economic benefits of new technologies in Australian aircraft and operations. This will allow Australia to achieve its potential as an aviation leader, aviation service provider and exporter. 

    2. In looking to the future, the Summit further resolved to:

    2.1 provide a statement of value of the General Aviation sector in Australia;

    2.2 provide a statement of opportunity for the General Aviation sector in Australia;

    2.3 recommend the Civil Aviation Act and other Acts associated with aviation including aviation infrastructure, be reviewed and amended to ensure implementation of Outcome Based regulation during the first term of the next government;

    2.4 in the meantime, to recommend a small number of amendments to the Civil Aviation Act to immediately refocus to a less prescriptive and holistic approach to regulation for bi-partisan passage through the parliament before the next election;

    RESOLUTION: CHANGES TO THE CIVIL AVIATION ACT

    Whereas the current regulatory stance adopted by CASA is out of step with contemporary regulatory practice, as adopted by The International Civil Aviation Organization through the promulgation of Annex 19, Safety Management Systems, and is contributing to the rapid decline of Australia’s general aviation industry, and 
    Whereas the World is facing a growing shortage of skilled aviation personnel and Australia has the opportunity to contribute to the training of these personnel in a way that can improve safety, the Aviation Summit finds that elements of the current Civil Aviation Act are not fit for purpose.

    Specifically, §9A, Performance of Functions, imposes upon CASA a limitation that impedes the development of performance-based regulation and the safety benefits that would otherwise be achieved. §9A (1) requires that, in exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must regard the safety of air navigation as the most important consideration and there is an urgent need to address this anomaly. 

    2.4.1. The Aviation Summit supports a review of the Civil Aviation Act, to include as a minimum, a repeal of §9A (1) and a replacement with the following language: 
    9A Performance of functions 

    (1) In exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must seek to achieve the highest level of safety in air navigation as well as: 

    (a) maintaining an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector; 

    (b) the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation. 

    2.4.2. The Summit delegates support the need to amend, as soon as possible, the Object of the Civil Aviation Act and other aviation related Acts, without reducing the primacy of safety, to include an amended Object to support a sustainable and viable aviation industry; 
    The main objective of the Act is to establish a regulatory framework for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the safety of civil aviation with particular emphasis on preventing aviation accidents and incidents;

    In addition to this, the objects must include;

    i. a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry;
    ii. enabling more people to benefit from aviation; and
    iii. emphasis on substantially reducing the administrative and financial burden of regulatory compliance.
    (Note: the final wording will be decided between both the Minister and Shadow Minister.

    2.4.3. The summit delegates also support the inclusion of government’s Red Tape Policy to be permanently inserted in Section 98.

    2.5 recommend establishment of an Office of Aviation Industry in the Department of Infrastructure and Transport to engage and assist industry to further foster and develop aviation both domestically and internationally; and

    2.6 recommend that there are a number of advances in aviation safety and amenity that can be made within the current regulations and responsibilities. The summit seeks to have an established programme to identify, prioritise and implement a programme of these changes with defined time-frames and covering CASA, ASA and Aerodrome Operators (see ANNEX 1)

    MTF...P2  Tongue
    Reply
    #38
    Wagga Summit: Extra sessions etc.



    Afternoon session: Presentations on changing the Act: 





    Segments of note: 

    Lawrence Paratz,International Comanche Society of Australasia: approx: -1:47:00 (must watch -  Wink )

    Senator Fraser Anning approx: -25:00

    Mike Smith approx: -21:00 



    GA SUMMIT 2018 - DINNER SPEECHES








    Day Two - Wagga Summit.




    The Hon Anthony Albanese MP addressing the General Aviation Summit 2018

    [Image: 36849445_1301873026610286_17844532681774...e=5BD0F054]



    AOPA AUSTRALIA - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018 - DAY TWO WORKSHOPS

    [Image: 36872561_1301807639950158_23653715780588...e=5BD3F319]



    News segment - Win News:






    Quote:High-flying summit resolves to liberate the skies with Aussies

    [Image: 5b1037299ebd34178dcd5f97ec2c6003]
    The Australian
    ... summit resolves to liberate the skies with Aussies. Labor's transport spokesman Anthony Albanese.

    ANNABEL HEPWORTH

    The general aviation sector must be “liberated” from over-­regulation so Australia can seize the opportunity to train pilots and engineers amid a growing global shortage of skilled aviators, major aviation groups say.

    In resolutions made late yesterday, a landmark general aviation summit held in Wagga Wagga vowed to recommend a “small number” of changes to the Civil Aviation Act that it hoped would win bipartisan support and pass parliament before the next election. The summit also resolved to push for changes to the Civil Aviation Act and other ­aviation-related laws to ensure “outcome-based” rules were rolled out during the first term of the next government.

    The sector wants the rewrite of the Civil Aviation Act to state that as well as seeking “highest level of safety in air navigation”, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is also required to aim to maintain an “efficient and sustainable” Australian aviation industry that includes a “viable” general aviation and training sector.

    Earlier yesterday, Labor’s transport spokesman Anthony Albanese said it was “indeed a tragedy that we have not enough pilots in Australia today at a time when we should not only be able to service our domestic needs, we should actually be an export country when it comes to training pilots in order to secure greater national income for the national economy”.

    “What we’re seeing is this enormous growth in aviation in the Asian region and Australia has enormous potential to benefit from that in terms of jobs and economic activity here,” Mr Albanese said.

    He said he was committed to working closely with Infrastructure and Transport Minister Michael McCormack so that “any changes that are required are dealt with in a bipartisan way”.

    Mr McCormack told the summit on Monday the government wanted to deliver “meaningful” reforms for the benefit of general aviation and had been in touch with Mr Albanese as he wanted to work in a bipartisan way.

    However, any change would need to pass through parliament and that was “not always easy”, he warned.

    The summit’s chairman, former Regional Express managing director Geoff Breust, said yesterday the resolutions were aimed at moving to “an outcomes-based regulatory system” instead of something that was “very prescriptive”.

    “Safety is still the highest priority in relation to it all but without consideration of those other things, and in particular the cost and administrative burden to the industry of compliance, you end up with a system where the regulatory regime simply doesn’t work effectively,” Mr Breust said.

    More than 35 groups attended the summit, although a clutch were there as observers.

    Among the conclusions of the summit was a statement that “the Australian economy has the opportunity to benefit from pilot and engineering training, aircraft and component maintenance and construction services flowing from the worldwide expansion of air travel and aviation activity — especially in Asia”.


    Outcomes/resolutions:


    [Image: 36831823_1302134429917479_37661849928293...e=5BA714ED]

    RESOLUTIONS - GENERAL AVIATION SUMMIT 2018


    The General Aviation Summit has agreed to pass two resolutions which (1) sets out the principal findings of the summit with regard to the regulation of general aviation in Australia and (2) commits the industry to providing appropriate information and to make recommendations for action on reform as follows.

    1. The General Aviation Summit concluded:

    1.1 General Aviation wants to maintain or improve Australia’s aviation safety outcomes; 

    1.2 the General Aviation sector is of vital importance to Australia especially regional and rural Australia not only in economic terms but in social and community service provision terms;

    1.3 the General Aviation sector, including the commercial elements of the sector, is overburdened with the complexity and cost flowing from the current Civil Aviation Act, Regulations and other aviation legislation; 

    1.4 the current regulatory regime is based on a prescriptive approach to rules and compliance. World best practice is based on Outcome Based regulation which Australia should implement immediately in accordance with DAS Directive 01/2015 and the Minister’s CASA Statement of Expectations;

    1.5 the cost and complexity burdens placed on the General Aviation sector are exacerbated by the actions of Airservices and airport operators, both privatised and local government owned, by further cost impositions, operational restrictions and inappropriate infrastructure development; 

    1.6 the Australian economy has the opportunity to benefit from pilot and engineering training, aircraft and component maintenance and construction services flowing from the world-wide expansion of air travel and aviation activity – especially in Asia. To achieve this, we must be able to respond effectively and be liberated from over regulation; and

    1.7 the attitude must be to adopt best regulatory practices in parallel with embracing safety and economic benefits of new technologies in Australian aircraft and operations. This will allow Australia to achieve its potential as an aviation leader, aviation service provider and exporter. 

    2. In looking to the future, the Summit further resolved to:

    2.1 provide a statement of value of the General Aviation sector in Australia;

    2.2 provide a statement of opportunity for the General Aviation sector in Australia;

    2.3 recommend the Civil Aviation Act and other Acts associated with aviation including aviation infrastructure, be reviewed and amended to ensure implementation of Outcome Based regulation during the first term of the next government;

    2.4 in the meantime, to recommend a small number of amendments to the Civil Aviation Act to immediately refocus to a less prescriptive and holistic approach to regulation for bi-partisan passage through the parliament before the next election;

    RESOLUTION: CHANGES TO THE CIVIL AVIATION ACT

    Whereas the current regulatory stance adopted by CASA is out of step with contemporary regulatory practice, as adopted by The International Civil Aviation Organization through the promulgation of Annex 19, Safety Management Systems, and is contributing to the rapid decline of Australia’s general aviation industry, and 
    Whereas the World is facing a growing shortage of skilled aviation personnel and Australia has the opportunity to contribute to the training of these personnel in a way that can improve safety, the Aviation Summit finds that elements of the current Civil Aviation Act are not fit for purpose.

    Specifically, §9A, Performance of Functions, imposes upon CASA a limitation that impedes the development of performance-based regulation and the safety benefits that would otherwise be achieved. §9A (1) requires that, in exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must regard the safety of air navigation as the most important consideration and there is an urgent need to address this anomaly. 

    2.4.1. The Aviation Summit supports a review of the Civil Aviation Act, to include as a minimum, a repeal of §9A (1) and a replacement with the following language: 
    9A Performance of functions 

    (1) In exercising its powers and performing its functions, CASA must seek to achieve the highest level of safety in air navigation as well as: 

    (a) maintaining an efficient and sustainable Australian aviation industry, including a viable general aviation and training sector; 

    (b) the need for more people to benefit from civil aviation. 

    2.4.2. The Summit delegates support the need to amend, as soon as possible, the Object of the Civil Aviation Act and other aviation related Acts, without reducing the primacy of safety, to include an amended Object to support a sustainable and viable aviation industry; 
    The main objective of the Act is to establish a regulatory framework for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the safety of civil aviation with particular emphasis on preventing aviation accidents and incidents;

    In addition to this, the objects must include;

    i. a strong, efficient and sustainable aviation industry;
    ii. enabling more people to benefit from aviation; and
    iii. emphasis on substantially reducing the administrative and financial burden of regulatory compliance.
    (Note: the final wording will be decided between both the Minister and Shadow Minister.

    2.4.3. The summit delegates also support the inclusion of government’s Red Tape Policy to be permanently inserted in Section 98.

    2.5 recommend establishment of an Office of Aviation Industry in the Department of Infrastructure and Transport to engage and assist industry to further foster and develop aviation both domestically and internationally; and

    2.6 recommend that there are a number of advances in aviation safety and amenity that can be made within the current regulations and responsibilities. The summit seeks to have an established programme to identify, prioritise and implement a programme of these changes with defined time-frames and covering CASA, ASA and Aerodrome Operators (see ANNEX 1)





    MTF...P2  Tongue
    Reply
    #39
    A DISCUSSION A DAY KEEPS REAL CHANGE AWAY

    Firstly, it is good to see some robust resolution items being tabled. It’s also good to see calls for bipartisan support to take place on both sides of the political landscape. However, ‘dialogue’ and ‘paper notes’ are mere window dressing. Real ‘change’ is yet to be seen, and we have had decades of group love-in sessions and wank fests, so excuse my scepticism. The longer we just ‘talk’ about the issue, the longer it will be until we see actual, measurable change.

    On the upside, kudos to those who supported the summit and attended. There were some ballsy, robust discussions from industry. Whether the Muppets in charge of the political asylum actually bring about change will be the real can kicker.

    P.S I was disappointed that the great white stuttering political elephant Albo didn’t do a pose for the photographer with his hands in the air! With a little more publicity I think a ‘hands in the air Albo pose’ could become as popular as twerking, planking, or bobbing for apples in the taxpayer trough!

    ‘Safe Wagga engagement for all’
    Reply
    #40
    Dunno about you Gobbles but I watched the Miniscules speech a few times.

    He went to great pains to advise everyone he's a straight talker, an honourable man,
    with integrity and probity......he's a bloody politician for Christ sake.

    He also mentioned Albo's name over and over. I developed the conclusion he was only there
    because he was scared shitless Albo would trump him.

    Methinks Minuscule spoke with forked tongue, I don't believe he's going to do a damned thing.
    Reply




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