CASA meets the Press
Litmus or Lietous testing?

Unless you have just strolled onto an airport for the first time, or been in a space capsule on Mars for three decades, it is possible that the latest ‘blurb’ from Carmody will cheer you. However, if you are an active aviation participant, you have to either smile and find a bucket – or take a taxi to the gap.

I wonder which planet Carmody has been on. Seriously – has he read the draft report on the shameful Pel-Air event – he should, before the world gets to see it.  Then I wonder how he has the brass neck to tout the latest ‘satisfaction survey’ as an example of how CASA is now, suddenly, wonderful. “What survey?” you ask – well, the one that fails to mention some of the major CASA inflicted headaches; like, no change to the McConvict signed ‘open slather’ rider to the ‘Embuggerance Manual’; Part 61 costs and associated stupidity, Part 135 cock-up; CAO 48.1 and the excesses that invokes; the lack of any real acceptance of the Forsyth report; SID’s; or, even the control cable lunacy; litmus tests all. But not mentioned in the ‘survey’ which is fluffed around the edges with inane, carefully selected questions and answers  - CASA – “Do you believe all CASA officers should wear matching jocks and socks?” – all deep, probing, self appraisal questions with predictable answers - not. Now Carmody wants us to believe CASA is a ‘honest’ hard working, conscientious, caring agency, with only our best interests at heart. Failed – Lietous test.

Following the ‘survey we get the ‘blurb’. I wonder where he gets the neck to publish it – after having managed to infuriate the RRAT Estimates committee and piss on industry in record time. The ministerial glove puppet then goes on to produce one of the biggest loads of open ended  ‘rhetoric’ yet recorded.  All the unmitigated Bollocks this pathetic individual we have for a minister would sell to the local CWA; although, I doubt the CWA is that naive.

“[and] I’m amazed how Australian aviation has evolved compared to 2009 when I was last at CASA.”

Yup, me too. ‘cept there’s a mistake the editor omitted; I shall correct it (save the him the bother).

“[and] I’m amazed how Australian aviation has devolved compared to 2009 when I was last at CASA.”

When Carmody was last at CASA there was a busy, thriving industry, which under Byron was actually starting to rub along with CASA; but that was many years and aberrations ago.

“My vision is for CASA to be an open and transparent regulator, “ etc.

Watch how ‘transparent it gets when we compare the 'draft' Pel-Air to  the 'final' published version. (Yes Greg, you leak). The shutters will  slam down, the drawbridge raised and locked, while the smoke and mirrors machine crew go on overtime.  Failed – Lietous test.

“[one] the aviation industry finds it easy to do business with”. Etc.

There are a few operators who could tell Carmody just how difficult, tedious, expensive, frustrating it actually is; before they got onto the ‘good stuff’ related to just how devious, deceitful, venal, incompetent and lazy some of those industry is forced to do business with (no option) really are. But Carmody won’t hear a bar of that song – history, in his purview, is best ignored.  Failed – Lietous test.

“My conclusion after eight months as acting director of aviation safety is that achieving this goal is more a matter of reforming CASA’s systems than its people.”

There stands as clear an indication that those who have, for the last decade, inflicted more damage and created more anger, lied, cheated, stolen, milked, bilked and prostituted the powers granted will be allowed to continue in the same manner, as you will ever see. CASA 'system' is hidebound, cumbersome and could do with a reform package and upgrade; but while the same evil is allowed to continue, unchallenged and unpunished; there is nothing but more of the same on the horizon. The only change will be that from now on, it will be better hidden by a ‘professional’ bureaucratic mantle of denial.  Failed – Lietous test.

“I’m impressed by the dedication and expertise of CASA’s staff, their commitment to fairness, and where appropriate, firmness in overseeing aviation safety.”

Well, at least there’s one person who is. What a pity he’s the their boss. Failed – Lietous test.

And so begins; the reign of Shameless O’ Carmody; off to a stellar start with some Senators calling ‘no confidence’ and none disagreeing with the call. I can’t be bothered taking the rest of this fatuous, fluffy statement apart; and anyway, the Hansard video of the last Estimates depicts the man, his attitude, arrogance and ambivalence toward a panel of Senators who actually have access to the real facts and circumstances.  Time has beaten me – again, but I shall save up for Sunday - perhaps we should examine in depth just why Carmody has already ‘screwed the pooch’ where it matters – in the Senate. MTF? Probably, once I get past the ‘retching for the bucket’ stage.

May your litmus paper always be in the red.

Toot  toot.

P.S. - http://www.auntypru.com/forum/showthread...73#pid7273
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This week on the LMH - Wink

Via Oz Flying:


Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]
 
As I sit here typing I am listening to the start-up sounds of a Piper Archer. The pilot and family are heading off for what they expect will be an enjoyable flight along the Victorian coast. In January last year, I am sure someone at Moorabbin listened to a Cherokee 235 burst into life as it set off on a leisurely flight to King Island. Only that flight wasn't so leisurely; the pilot and crew encountered poor visibility south of Barwon Heads and the result was the worst possible outcome. It has to frustrate both CASA and the ATSB that pilots continue to push the limits of visual flight, only to find that if they cross that limit there is no coming back. It happened again this week near Mount Gambier. Why do we keep doing this? Do we think we are better pilots than we really are? Are we not adequately trained in reading weather conditions? I don't think even the ATSB has answers regardless of all the messages they and CASA send out. That Piper Archer has just rolled on the runway blessed with much more amenable weather conditions than PXD had, and several airports en route. I look forward to seeing them again in a few hours.


“This may reflect on AOPA's determination not to play by the traditional Canberra political rules”

AOPA Australia must be feeling a tad marginalised in Canberra at the moment. AOPA has done as much as any association to try to shepherd genuine reforms through the bureaucratic maze, but they find themselves on the outer when it comes to consultation groups. AOPA has not been included on the Forum on Western Sydney Airport (FOWSA), which Ed Husic MP raised in parliament last week, nor on CASA's new Aviation Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP). Admittedly, not every association can sit on every panel or committee (it would make it completely disfunctional), but AOPA is a big one to leave out. In the case of ASAP, The Australian Aviation Associations Forum (TAAAF) of which AOPA is a member, has got a guernsey, so CASA has pointed out that AOPA has representation through them. Here's one possible, but not the only, answer why AOPA doesn't make it to the tables. CASA and the department see TAAAF, RAAus and RAAA as professional organisations, but AOPA may come across to them as well-meaning, but perhaps a tad amateurish. This may reflect on AOPA's determination not to play by the traditional Canberra political rules.

You just can't applaud Orange Aero Engineering loud enough, can you? Daniel Thomas and his team have donated refurbishing skills to AOPA to restore a C152 to be used to inspire young people to get involved in aviation. The value of this is thought to be around $50,000. This is a great contribution Orange Aero have made to the future of general aviation, and it is only one part of an enlightenment happening in GA that we all need to put in to our community if we want to prosper. Both AOPA and GA need more people like this who are prepared to step up and say "we can help". Much kudos and a shout out to this team.

Red Bull is back in Budapest this weekend, which I look forward to every year more than any other round. I suppose I am a bit like those people who watch the Tour de France only for the scenery and don't worry much about the bike riders. I love the old buildings and statues, the iconic Chain Bridge and the beautiful meandering Danube that separates the old cities of Buda and Pest. But the difference between me and the TdF watchers is that I care immensely about what happens on the track. Go Matt Hall!

Tomorrow marks the official closing of Wings Awards nominations. However, your judging panel has again been swayed to extend the deadline by a week. You now have until the end of the day on Saturday 8 July to get your nomination in. So, if you missed it by hair, you have a seven day grace period. We look forward to seeing more submissions.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...ZZxlrQk.99
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Hitch assesses AvMed online; AOPA broadside & GA BITRE delay - Wink  

LMH via the Yaffa:
Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 7 July 2017


This week I had the most enlightening experience of using the new CASA AVMED system in anger. That's not a metaphor; I really got angry with it. When CASA's stakeholder engagement people knew I was up for my Class 2 renewal, they said they would be very interested in my feedback, so strap in guys, here it is. The online system probably has merit, but I am struggling to find it right now. As I see it, it's the same old rubbishy questionnaire, but now you do it with a computer, not a pen. And that is my first problem: once you have submitted it there's no way to correct errors. With a pen you could always cross it out and put in the right answer, but not with this system.

Quote: I can imagine, given the average age of private pilots, that many can't remember those details

Which leads to my second beef: there is no date limit for the information they demand. Questions such as "have you ever had an x-ray?" or "have you ever been to see a medical practitioner?" are accompanied with a request for the month and year you did it.
I can imagine, given the average age of private pilots, that many can't remember those details, meaning either making up some rubbish or omitting it simply to get to the next step. And when you think about it, how does having a x-ray for a broken arm in 1974 affect a pilot's fitness to fly in 2017? Yet, that info is required. In other words, the system encourages pilots to lie either directly or by omission, just because its easier, and human nature will always guide us down the easiest path. Even my DAME when asking questions used the qualifier "recently".

Now comes the most important part of the AVMED system: paying the $75 fee. The system states quite emphatically (and confirmed with a call to CASA) that the fee for Class 1 and 3 can be paid in advance, but not a Class 2; that has to be paid "at the time of examination." My DAME knew nothing about that and got frustrated when trying to process my medical, It seems the system detected no payment and therefore refused to have anything to do with me. The DAME knew nothing about taking money and neither did his staff. A call back to CASA revealed that DAMEs are resisting taking the money on CASA's behalf. In the end it got sorted with me giving my credit card details to CASA directly, and they went through $75 worth of work to push a button somewhere. On the credit side, my proper medical certificate arrived the next day. That was impressive!
Righto, so what does all that mean? Simply put, getting it online could be a good idea, but the questionnaire should have been straightened out and made more relevant and logical first.

AOPA Australia has delivered a broadside to CASA over what they say is unfair exclusion from the new ASAP. In a letter to Shane Carmody and The Hon. Darren Chester MP, AOPA CEO Ben Morgan all but accuses CASA of deliberately stifling genuine feedback and industry opposition. That might be one salvo too many to say that, but many of the other arguments are compelling. However, it seems to me there is more at stake here: the question of who represents GA in Canberra. Both the department and CASA appear very happy to deal with TAAAF, most likely because it means they can deal with one consolidated voice from the bleachers rather than a cacophany of different opinions from each and every acronym. TAAAF is supposed to be a united voice, so by AOPA, AMROBA and AAAA wanting separate representation, are they telling us that TAAAF is not as united as they are supposed to be? What other conclusion are we supposed to draw?

And we have our answer now on the BITRE GA study: it's been delayed until 31 August. As I said in LMH on 23 June, this report will be used to justify government action and in-action for several years to come, so it really does represent a milestone in the future of general aviation in Australia. The other thing we need to remember is that 31 August is the day the report is due to be handed to the minister, not the day the general public gets to find out what's in it. For that we may have to hang on for a few weeks further until the department has perused it, digested it, then prepared a response. It is possible that response, when it comes, will be more earth-shaking than the report itself.

One more day and that's it! The 2017 Wings Awards nominations have to close at midnight tomorrow night. We have become aware of several late nominations (usually via frantic phone calls), and all we can do is encourage them to get in what they have. It's better to be on the list than not on the list, even if you really haven't polished the submission the way you want to. So get your skates on and get them in.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...1Ugaofy.99
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Hitch on MRO decline; KC on independent FIs; & possible drone collision - Rolleyes

LMH via the Yaffa Wink :
Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 14 July 2017

by Steve Hitchen

CASA's MRO figures tell a story that most of us were familiar with several years ago: the industry's engine is misfiring and unless we are able to diagnose and correct the problem we can expect to glide to an inevitable collision with terrain. That, of course, presumes that the number of maintenance organisations is an indicator of industry health. I find it interesting that compulsory measures such as the Cessna SIDs program and the mandatory fitment of ADS-B has drawn large amounts of cash into the MRO industry that would not normally have been spent, but still companies are closing their doors. CASA, as expected, has come out and said there's more to the causes than just regulation. The two they cite are legitimate: business is moving overseas or into the recreational sector.

However, both of these causes have resulted in the loss of jobs AOPA predicted in May last year. It is true that we can't analyse anything simply in aviation, and so CASA's answers themselves need greater examination. Why have jobs gone overseas? Why is there a trend toward recreational aviation? And those questions are just the start of it!

Quote:"the rising cost of providing flight training has caused many schools to close over the years"

What I find most interesting is Ken Cannane's left-of-centre solution that the decline in MROs comes down to not having independent flying instructors. The bow he has drawn is not as long as that statement first appears. The base problem the industry has, I believe, is simply diminishing participation. Collectively, the private and training sectors accounted for more GA hours in 2013 than any other single sector, which highlights how important it is to the industry as a whole. Unfortunately, the rising cost of providing flight training has caused many schools to close over the years, and new entrants have been focussing on international students and training almost solely for airlines. Independent instructors hanging out their shingles at smaller regional airports would improve the catchment for private GA, but that would happen only if they weren't burdened with regulations that require an ops manual larger than the complete set of Encyclopedia Britannica and a quality system designed for an airline.

Has Australia has its first aeroplane-drone collision? Certainly something hit an FTA Tobago on approach to Parafield, and the ATSB stated that it could potentially be a remotely-piloted aircraft. It would have all been much simpler if there was either drone wreckage or a bird carcass underneath the flight path, but the absence of both has made life harder for the ATSB. What this incident has served to do is add weaponary to the arsenal of senators currently fuming over the drone regulations. With a senate inquiry into the industry well underway, this incident may prove vital evidence that impacts the outcome. Or, it could just be another birdstrike.

And that's it for the 2017 Wings Awards nominations! Entries have closed for the year and are now with the judging panel. Thanks to all those who send in submissions. It seems you were all listening as the quality of nomination this year was excellent, making life more difficult for the judges, but also giving every submission a decent shot at winning. Well done to all those who nominated.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...kuGoSFV.99
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LMH on BITRE stats & AMROBA, AOPA ASAP disgruntlement - Rolleyes  

Via the Yaffa... Wink :

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 21 July 2017

 - Steve Hitchen

I find it most interesting that everyone loves the quote "Lies, damned lies and statistics", yet although it is possibly one of the most quoted phrases in political history, no-one has ever claimed to be the originator. Mark Twain said that it was Benjamin Disraeli, but nothing has ever been found in Disraeli's papers so most people attribute it to Twain. To me it reflects the problem inherent with statistics: the world needs them but they can be interpreted so many different ways that the very same set of numbers can be used to support just about any argument. Consequently, their true value can never be established. So what are we to think now BITRE has released the 2015 aviation activity figures? For sure they show a decline in VH-registered GA hours of 2.4%, but those figure appear not to include "non-scheduled commercial air transport", which the industry tends to call "charter" (either open or FIFO) and considers an integral part of GA. The drop-off in that category is only 0.9%, which dilutes the GA decline to 2% total. That's the way BITRE has traditionally reported GA trends year-over-year. Also, the "Sport and Recreational" sector figures can be somewhat rubbery as well. Although it hints at a growth of 0.2%, closer inspection shows that the "recreational" bit has registered a 3% drop in hours. Yes, the gyro people showed growth and the vario on the glider industry's panel is making a 3.8% happy sound, but in real terms these two groups are not the future of this sector if we are measuring for economic recovery. That's RAAus, and by 2015 standards, it would appear they are in the same malaise as their VH-registered counterparts. Of course, that's the way I read the stats; you're free to make up your own lies.

Sometimes, when you're good at reading between lines, you start to understand something that you really hope you've got wrong. In the past couple of weeks, I have had a persistent thought that general aviation representation in Canberra is on the verge of being rent asunder. AOPA and AMROBA have been feeling very unloved after being left off the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel, despite the inclusion of TAAAF, of which both groups are members. It caused me to air the thought that TAAAF might not be as united as we think they are. Now it seems that itch in my brain cells may be correct. I suspect we are about to see some of the TAAAF members taking their own path of advocacy rather than allowing TAAAF to speak on their behalf. This is not good at all. The reason TAAAF was taken onto ASAP is because CASA needs that united voice to be able to consult effectively. It has been said many times before that GA is not united in what they want, and that has always provided CASA with the ammunition they needed to justify ignoring calls for reform. You've all heard the old saying "divide and conquer". It refers to dividing and conquering the enemy, not dividing your own troops in order to win the battle. Should GA advocacy divide in Canberra, winning the war for reform will become a whole lot harder. No-one wins a civil war except the common enemy.

I just love Matt Hall's attitude towards racing. In spite of an ordinary year that has him in 11th place in the Red Bull Air Race World Championship, the Aussie appears to have no qualms about being prepared to lose in order to give himself the chance of winning. He managed to disqualify himself in Budapest by deliberately taking the aeroplane into a zone he didn't know much about. As a result, he exceeded the g-limit. If he got it right, he was in with a shot of a great performance, but he had to make the mistake in order to learn how to get it right. With Kazan on this weekend, you can be sure he'll be out there on the edge again as he seeks to find the performance limits of his plane. That could mean a blinder of a race for Hall, or another big lesson learnt. For sure he won't be playing it safe; he's done that before come off second best.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...R8wIXd5.99
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[Image: Pollies_TW_2016_CB82A5C0-1576-11E6-99C802D27ADCA5FF.jpg]


Opinions, Statistics and stacked decks.

Hitch – “I suspect we are about to see some of the TAAAF members taking their own path of advocacy rather than allowing TAAAF to speak on their behalf.”

I suspect Hitch is picking up the same ‘vibe’ as AP and there are several IMO valid arguments to support the desire for ‘self representation’.

History supports this need for self representation to a point where it becomes a requirement. There have been many such ‘consultations’ very few of which have resulted in a satisfactory outcome for ‘all’ parties concerned. The proposed ‘broad brush’ approach to the different problems faced by individual associations, each with differing needs, is too early in the piece This particularly so when ‘reform’ is on the agenda and the ‘detail’ of that reform is imperative to the survival of each association.

Trust or, more accurately, the lack thereof remains in short supply. Not only is there a deep distrust of CASA, which has historically been proven accurate so many times over now, that it has become deeply ingrained in the industry thinking. Then, there is no track record to support those who have been selected to take part, not of the detail – the ‘nitty-gritty’ of each associations problems. There is also a growing perception that the small TAAAF team will become captive and begin to understand the CASA problems and negotiations will become skewed. No one is saying this will happen – but the perception, based on historical fact exists. Look no further than the great white hope -  Boyd and the CASA board for confirmation.

Divide and conquer has long been an effective tool in the CASA bag of tricks; that and ‘control’, through overt and covert threat. Once the TAAAF team are engaged, there is no telling the outcome; and that adds to the worries of the folks awaiting those outcomes.    

Hitch “ The reason TAAAF was taken onto ASAP is because CASA needs that united voice to be able to consult effectively.”

Therein lies the problem’s nub – a ‘united’ voice. Many would see that voice as being carefully selected to sing from the CASA hymn sheet. I doubt many in industry would believe CASA has any intention, whatsoever, of ‘reforming’. Leopards don’t change their spots; not in my jungle at least. The scurrilous, disrespectful treatment the Senate recommendations on Pel Air were given; added to the disgraceful attitude to Forsyth’s report lend serious support to the argument that CASA is, once again, dodging the bullets and reducing the noise level in the ministers office. It is a reasonable position to be concerned that ‘tame’ industry panel, which ‘understands’ how the game is played would suit the ministerial purpose.

Hitch - “It has been said many times before that GA is not united in what they want, and that has always provided CASA with the ammunition they needed to justify ignoring calls for reform.”

Only up to a point mate; and CASA has played a clever hand in fostering that disunity and promoting discord. But, if you talk to say – the Ag pilots and the Warbirds chaps – their ‘needs’ are similar; their wants identical. Talk to a regional airline operator and a parachute operator; their needs and wants are also similar. Talk to a flying school and an airline – same-same needs and wants. They are all united in one great need; reform of the regulator and the bloody awful regulations.  There may be different requirements in operational detail and commercial objectives; but they are all rock solid on regulatory reform and red tape reduction. If that were to be the sole topic of the ASAP, then perhaps the various groups could relax and rely on a united, trusted voice. But they can’t, can they. The groups are reliant on a small, unknown group negotiating on their behalf. If I ran an association I think I’d want to be there to make certain that we had a say; a long, loud say as part of a united push the reform the regulator and the regulations. Can’t find it in me to blame anyone for wanting to be there; just to be sure, to be sure.

[Image: Phil-Hurst-AAAA.jpg]





Hitch - “ You've all heard the old saying "divide and conquer". It refers to dividing and conquering the enemy, not dividing your own troops in order to win the battle. Should GA advocacy divide in Canberra, winning the war for reform will become a whole lot harder. No-one wins a civil war except the common enemy.

The solution is simplicity itself: resolve the distrust, remove the doubt, let any legitimate association provide a couple of representatives – Mike Smith for AOPA; Ken Cannane for AOPA, Phil Hurst for AAAA; and, whoever else is responsible to an organisation for it’s well being. What’s that, about six more seats at the table adding credibility. Sound fair and reasonable? Does to me./...

[Image: Chester-the-charlatan-Transport-Minister.jpg]


There can only be one cynical response to the minister refusing to acknowledge and include those who can provide a life time of expertise, knowledge and responsibility to the industry outside of airline operations; it’s a rigged game involving snake oil, smoke, mirrors and the same old party hats. I think Chester has made a serious blunder and widened the increasing credibility gap – poorly advised by those who are masters of deflecting any and all reforms; let alone wanting to admit that in thirty years, they have wasted $399, 999, 999 and managed to almost decimate a thriving industry in doing so.

If it ain’t the industry who did this; then government must take a long, hard look who did. Then ask why can’t the victims be heard – should they wish to speak.

“Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.” (Yeats).

Toot toot.


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Drag out the bucket - "K", Gobbles, anyone?? Confused

From yet another soft cock, M&M scripted presser from miniscule 6D_NFI_Chester it is becoming quite obvious that the inevitable, self-serving pushback from the aviation safety bureaucracy is occurring... Angry :

(Again warning - puke bucket will be required)

Quote:Blueprint for CASA's future
Media Release
DC220/2017
24 July 2017


A fresh blueprint for the future for the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has been released by the Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester.

Mr Chester said CASA's latest corporate plan continues CASA's focus on safety as its highest priority and sets out how the nation's aviation safety regulator will be pragmatic, practical and proportional in its responsibilities.

“The 2017–18 CASA corporate plan is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia to help maintain our record of having one of the safest skies in the world,” Mr Chester said.

“In addition to its regulatory approach the plan identifies a number of key aviation activities and highlights strong stakeholder engagement as a priority.

“CASA will maintain and enhance a fair, effective and efficient aviation safety regulation system while collaboratively engaging with the wider aviation community to promote and support a positive safety culture. CASA will also continually improve its organisational performance.

“I am particularly pleased to see CASA is committed to modernising its service delivery to meet the evolving needs of all sectors of Australian aviation.

“In 2017–18 CASA will develop a customer service charter that will shape the way it delivers client services.

“It will optimise client service channel options and will drive a digital first approach to medical certification.

“The overarching objective will be to create an efficient, simple and accessible experience for the people and organisations in aviation that conduct regulatory business with CASA,” Mr Chester said.

Other important initiatives in the latest CASA corporate plan include a review of the safety regulatory strategy for remotely piloted aircraft systems, commencing implementation of the final tranche of regulatory reform, and continuing the implementation of the Government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review.

The corporate plan is available online: www.casa.gov.au/publication/corporate-plan-2017–18
[Image: dc220_2017-Darren-Chester-with-Shane-Carmody.jpg]
Photo: Mr Chester with CASA CEO Shane Carmody.
  
Somewhat bizarrely this bollocks miniscule Fort Fumble blueprint was also reported on by the Government GBE 'Infrastructure Australia' personal (ATP funded) propaganda publication... Huh :
Quote:CASA’s Future outlined
By
IA:Admin
-
July 24, 2017

Blueprint for CASA’s future

An updated blueprint for the future for the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has been released by the Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester.

Mr Chester said CASA’s latest corporate plan continues CASA’s focus on safety as its highest priority and sets out how the nation’s aviation safety regulator will be pragmatic, practical and proportional in its responsibilities.

“The 2017–18 CASA corporate plan is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia to help maintain our record of having one of the safest skies in the world,” Mr Chester said.

“In addition to its regulatory approach the plan identifies a number of key aviation activities and highlights strong stakeholder engagement as a priority.

“CASA will maintain and enhance a fair, effective and efficient aviation safety regulation system while collaboratively engaging with the wider aviation community to promote and support a positive safety culture. CASA will also continually improve its organisational performance.

“I am particularly pleased to see CASA is committed to modernising its service delivery to meet the evolving needs of all sectors of Australian aviation.

“In 2017–18 CASA will develop a customer service charter that will shape the way it delivers client services.

“It will optimise client service channel options and will drive a digital first approach to medical certification.

“The overarching objective will be to create an efficient, simple and accessible experience for the people and organisations in aviation that conduct regulatory business with CASA,” Mr Chester said.

Other important initiatives in the latest CASA corporate plan include a review of the safety regulatory strategy for remotely piloted aircraft systems, commencing implementation of the final tranche of regulatory reform, and continuing the implementation of the Government’s response to the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review.

You can download the entire plan HERE


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It really is tiresome and somewhat depressing reading M&M scripted drivel like this.
The same old, same old stuff.
A bit of a trawl back over the past twenty years of "Statements"  reveals the same old platitudes,
same old mother goose statements, all very nice and touchy feely for the regulators troops but
nothing of substance for whats left of a bleeding demoralised industry, just a sure
knowledge that more of the same is coming their way, nothing will change.



"Mr Chester said CASA's latest corporate plan continues CASA's focus on safety as its highest priority and sets out how the nation's aviation safety regulator will be pragmatic, practical and proportional in its responsibilities."

Past performance, the list of embuggerances and double standards gives the lie to this statement.
"Safety as the highest priority"...... Its NOT about safety its about self service and aggrandisement.


"Practical"?...is there anyone in the industry who believes Part61 is in the slightest "Practical"?

“In addition to its regulatory approach the plan identifies a number of key aviation activities and highlights strong stakeholder engagement as a priority."

We are rapidly approaching a point where it will be very hard to identify any aviation activities other than RPT, the government subsidised corporations disguised as charities and the military.

“The 2017–18 CASA corporate plan is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia to help maintain our record of having one of the safest skies in the world,” Mr Chester said."

Perhaps if this statement read as:

“The 2017–18 CASA corporate plan is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia to help maintain our record of having one of the most expensive skies in the world,” Mr Chester said."

It would be closer to the truth, Safest we are most certainly not.

“In 2017–18 CASA will develop a customer service charter that will shape the way it delivers client services.

In this "Modern" era CAsA virtually runs the smaller operations. From the CEO down they decide who oversees corporate governance within a company, even to the point where CAsA FOI's dictate who may be employed and who may not.They decide how operations are to be conducted, according to their own opinions, in some cases contrary to manufacturers recommendations, they decide how they are to be maintained, sometimes contrary to manufacturers  recommendations. This ghost management of aviation companies is by and large dictated by a "Public Service" mentality, where cost and practicality form no part of the matrix. A great example of the mindset can be seen in a waffle piece on the CAsA web sight to promote safety management systems. There was an imaginary business operating a couple of Navajo's and a Metro. This imaginary company required no less than twenty admin staff.
If CAsA staff are ghost running GA companies is it any wonder so many are going to the wall.


“The overarching objective will be to create an efficient, simple and accessible experience for the people and organisations in aviation that conduct regulatory business with CASA,” Mr Chester said.

The question is, why bother? there will soon be nobody left to conduct regulatory business with.

I would have thought a better statement would have been;


"Due to the continuing decline of aviation activity, CAsA see's no imperative to invest in any further costly aviation "reform".
The current rule set has been very effective in containing aviation accidents, therefore CAsA's focus is to embark on a rationalisation of staff numbers to reflect the current environment with a view to implementing efficiencies by way of redundancies across its workforce."

Unfortunately the unintended consequence of this would be a sharp decline in the academic world as it appears a good many CAsA staff spend the majority of their working time studying for their masters degrees or PHD's.
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Wingnut on hols, GGG in charge - God help us! Confused

(GGG: Graeme the Glaswegian Git)

Remember this from last Estimates?





&..





This GGG 'up yours Senators' input on the semantics of what qualifies as a 'catastrophic' engine failure, so incensed Barry'O'Braces that he again brought up the exchange at  subsequent Drone Wars inquiry hearings:

Quote:Dr Martin : I often think, don't get involved in things that are not within your sphere of control. The argument in and around recreational UAVs and sub-two-kilo thresholds and the consequence of that—there is so much uncertainty and political stuff involved with it that I leave it to you and CASA.

Senator O'SULLIVAN: Well, don't leave it to CASA!

Mr Thynne : I pose a question, Senator, about determination of what the acceptable level of risk is. How you determine to treat a risk depends on what is an acceptable level of risk, and the values you place on various things. The Kiwis, for example, actually have a dollar value on the lives of people, and they use that in determining acceptable risk for their aviation rules. What is the acceptable level of risk in Australia for aviation?

Senator O'SULLIVAN: Well, the head of CASA told us that it is like a man on a bicycle going into the traffic—evidence before the Senate estimates inquiry. So, you are 100 per cent right. But we do not share that view; we have another view, a different description of the risk profile, as do any number of peer reviewed studies from around the world, on the precautionary principle: sub-two-kilo, if it hits the nose cone of a passenger aircraft, could penetrate it, and all that comes with that. Do you want to know CASA's risk profile? They said to us that if it goes into a turbine engine, 'Don't fret; you'll only lose that engine, and the other one will still be going.' I mean, you wonder why we have a rash, why we break out in a sweat in this space. This is the sort of attitude we are confronting from our regulators. And what we are trying to get from the community—we are doing exactly what you have called for. You have to be able to answer the tough questions. You have to be able to tell us that we can allow for the proliferation of an industry....

I wonder how Barry O will feel when he discovers that this same individual (i.e. GGG) is currently running Fort Fumble, while (rumour has it) CC is on hols and providing top-cover support as acting infrastructure puppet-master for Muppet 6D: (who is OS playing with Chinese train-sets... Rolleyes - see HERE).

Via Oz Aviation:

Quote:CASA signs MoU with IATA for access to aviation safety audit data
July 26, 2017 by australianaviation.com.au
[Image: 777-200LR_C-FIUF_SYDNEY_25APRIL2015_SETH-JAWORSKI-2.jpg]CASA will use IOSA reports to monitor foreign airlines operating to Australia. (Seth Jaworski)

Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has widened its monitoring of foreign airlines to include International Air Transport Association (IATA) safety audit data.

The nation’s aviation safety watchdog has signed a memorandum of understanding with the airlines’ industry body to gain access to IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) reports.

“CASA will use the IOSA information to complement the existing oversight and surveillance of foreign airlines,” CASA acting chief executive and director of aviation safety Graeme Crawford said in the July CASA Briefing note.

“It will also be used as part of the assessment process for new foreign carriers seeking authorisation to operate to Australia.”

Crawford said Australia was the first country in Asia Pacific to use IOSA as part of the safety oversight of airlines.

The IOSA program assesses the operational management and control systems of an airline. Airlines must hold IOSA certification to be a member of IATA. There are also airlines that have gone through the IOSA program but are not members of IATA.

While CASA will initially only access foreign carrier IOSA reports, Crawford said the aim was to eventually include locally-based airlines.

“In the future we expect to have access to IOSA information in relation to Australian carriers, which will be used to support our existing audit and surveillance work,” Crawford said.

“CASA worked closely with IATA to understand their audit processes, quality assurance arrangements and management of approved auditors.

“The use of the information will benefit airlines as it will make CASA’s surveillance and audits even more efficient and effective.”

CASA noted US Federal Aviation Administration, the European Aviation Safety Agency and China already had agreements to share IOSA information.
  
Err...no comment except to say it is passing strange that a former Qantas Executive manager - see GGG CV HERE - who should have vast experience on the safety aspects and costs of suffering any form of engine failure, could be so blasé to the possible implications of a drone impacting and being sucked through the intake of a large jet turbine engine... Undecided


MTF...P2 Cool
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Hitch armed with Tim Tams on FF's Corporate plans- Shy  

Via this week's Oz Flying LMH... Wink

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 28 July 2017
 
 - Steve Hitchen
It usually takes a few cups of coffee and a Tim Tam or two to get through CASA's Corporate Plan when it comes in, and fortunately for me this year the cupboard was well stocked. It is, of course, an official document written in fluent Officialese, which can take some interpretation to work out what they are actually saying. However, there's one statement on p23 that can't be read any other way: "Over the following three years we will complete the regulatory reform program." Next year, despite several assurances of definite completion deadlines, the reform program turns 30 years old (do we get cake?). Consequently, it's hard to approach this predicted end to the epic reform program with any confidence. If Byron, McCormick and Skidmore failed to bring it to a close, what is Shane Carmody going to do different that his predecessors failed to do? It could be that the current Director of Aviation Safety has a more secure handle on what the great hold-up is, and so can adapt a much more suitable solution. I suppose it has to end somewhere, but in the great tradition of painting the Sydney Harbour Bridge, by the time CASA announces the end it will be time to reform the original completed parts; they'll be over 30 years old by then. With that in mind, will there ever actually be an end?

Quote:CASA needs to get over it's chronic case of Not-Invented-Here Syndrome

What I did like to see on paper is that CASA has indicated it will in future accept regulatory change proposals from the aviation industry and community. This is simply smart. CASA, despite their position in the industry, is not the complete repository of all aviation safety knowledge, and there are many people in the industry with expertise that CASA could leverage through this sort of approach. However, it will take two things for this to work: the aviation community has to grit their teeth and engage, and CASA needs to get over it's chronic case of Not-Invented-Here Syndrome. If CASA can solve these two issues, and use the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel prudently, it could bring about a huge increase in aviation safety in Australia.

Dynon Avionics' entry into the certified aircraft market is sure to shake-up the traditional EFIS manufacturers. The company has made its name with top-quality products for the sport and recreational markets, and now they are leveraging that over to tackle some very great names like Garmin, Avidyne, Aspen and Honeywell/Bendix King. The end result for aircraft owners surely has to be a decrease in price as well as an increase in functionality and ease-of-use. It's an STC thing only at the moment, but can it be long before we start to see Dynon equipment fitted as standard to new aircraft?

Didn't Kazan turn the Red Bull Air Race World Championship on its head. Kirby Chambliss came out of the pack on the turn and now heads the field as they charge down the final straight! One week we were talking about how the field would be out after Yoshi Muroya, only to have Chambliss blind-side everyone with two straight victories. It has set up the series for a great last three races with only two points separating the top four pilots! By the end of the Porto round in the first week of September, any one of five pilots could have a points advantage over the rest of the field. This going to be a brilliant finish, and I won't be surprised at all if the contest goes all the way to Indianapolis.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...uYs3osb.99
MTF...P2 Cool
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Once more unto the library.

Once more unto the library, dear friends, once more
Or, plug up the holes with our reforming dead. (Sorry Henry)..

One can almost picture Hitch, sitting on the back veranda, coffee mug, pile of Tim Tam, ever ready camera at his elbow, lap top open in front, taking a last look at the garden before plunging into the latest convection from whoever writes the dribble signed by the minister. I admire his fortitude and forbearance; but, how can you do it without ‘the bucket’ close to hand?  

Hitch “Consequently, it's hard to approach this predicted end to the epic reform program with any confidence.”

The hard, cold, demonstrable truth requires little reading – certainly not a Tim Tam’s worth. A succession of similar missives have been published, all promising the world and delivering an Atlas. It is abundantly clear that CASA have no intention, none, whatsoever of reforming themselves, or the regulations in any way. The system suits, the power base unshakeable, the minister will follow the advice and industry will be left to carry the regulatory burden and shoulder the outrageous costs, delays, criminal charges, strict liability, manipulation, embuggerance and terminal stupidity, no matter the twaddle that the silly, disinterested minister signs his name to.

Well done Hitch; getting through to p23 is a fine effort. In the Aunty Pru library, there are 30 years worth of ‘ministerial’ statements; all relating to the reform of both regulator and regulations. If you ever get the time, inclination or opportunity, drop into the house boat one day and read through them. You will see, exactly, how it’s all been said before, the pattern has never changed, the result inevitable and entirely predictable after you have read through a scant half dozen. Sad, expensive, pointless, but eminently true is the saga of no reform. All there, on the record. Ludicrous (refer Einstein or Twain on insanity).

Not Hitch:

[Image: Mark_Twain%2C_New_Hampshire%2C_1905.JPG]
Toot toot.
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This week's LMH off the Yaffa - Wink

Quote:–  Steve Hitchen

I have to confess to being one of those annoying people that doesn't believe in karma or "signs" that the universe is trying to tell me something, until I get one that is so strong it can't be ignored. Then I'm not only on the bandwagon, I'm driving it! In the past week we have seen the Bristell crash at Clyde North, the tragic beach landing in Portugal and the video of the C150 attempt to land on a highway. Each of these incidents turned out badly, and there are still people in hospital. None of us are currently in a position to say with any integrity what happened, but in time we will find out. However, it did have me scrambling for my logbook to find out when I last did a practice forced landing. It was during my AFR in June last year, and unless my memory is playing tricks (again!) I turned an easy exercise into a flying disaster. Prior to that, I hadn't done PFLs since my Jabiru training in 2013. That's nowhere near often enough to stay competent. So, next week I've booked a plane and instructor to do an hour of PFLs. I mean, you can't ignore the signs, can you?

Quote:... this is what happens when things get professional ...

Airventure Australia has received a boost from its sponsorship deal with OzRunways; a significant sum I am told that has probably made the event a possibility. And with that commercial arrangement has come exclusivity, which means we won't be seeing the AvPlan stand at the event this year. That's a shame because AvPlan has been a big supporter of the Narromine weekend since its inception. However, this is what happens when things get professional, and it seems to me that's what the organising consortium (RAAus, SAAA, APF) is trying to do with Narromine. Neither the consortium nor OzRunways can be blamed for striking a deal so beneficial to both of them. But what will this do to the relationship between OzRunways and AvPlan, which has been historically amicable? I suspect the two are about to get competitive at a level we've not yet seen.
The new Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC) rules are now in force. We could argue until we all fall down about whether or not the new measures are necessary, but it's pretty clear they will have a huge impact on private pilots around the country. The new regs state that we can't have our documents verified by the usual JP/police/solicitor/pharmacist anymore, but only by someone who is a trained agent of the Issuing Body. Furthermore, we can't mail the documents, but have to present them in person. The government continues to call these new rule "improvements", but the general aviation community seems to prefer the term "impediments". With so few ASIC Issuing Bodies in Australia (and one less now RAAus has thrown in the towel), it is becoming increasingly hard to get an ASIC because of where these companies are. And even if they do set up an agency in your area, you will be paying more for your ASIC because the agents are unlikely to do it free.

Our sister publication, Flightpath, has its latest issue on the shelves and in the letterboxes now! If warbirds and antique aeroplanes are your thing, you'd do well to get hold of a copy soonest you can!

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...SxX6ugX.99
Also a rehash of the Annabel Hepworth Oz article - Dick Smith: General Aviation Sector faces ruin - with comments... Rolleyes

Quote:...The number of general aviation aircraft that are flying has fallen further, sparking warnings by businessman and aviation veteran Dick Smith that the sector faces “destruction”.

Mr Smith issued the warning about the challenges facing the general aviation sector as recent figures from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics show that the number of active aviation aircraft doing GA work was 8976 in 2015.

This is a fall on the year prior, when there were 10,034 active aircraft in GA operations. In 2013, there were 10,173 aircraft, although this was up on the 9448 ­recorded in 2012. Mr Smith lamented that “less and less” people were flying.
“It’s absolutely criminal what’s happening to general aviation. It’s the basis for airline pilot training,” Mr Smith told The Australian.

“It’s very serious ... it’s basically the destruction of an industry.”

As evidence of the decline in the sector, Mr Smith pointed to the serious difficulties he had in attempting to getting his beloved Cessna Citation serviced.

Mr Smith sold the Citation last year, saying at the time that it was “simply too expensive to keep it running in Australia with the regulations we are forced to comply with”.

The warning comes after it emerged last month that a landmark review into the costs and red tape impacting the sector has been delayed. While the report, also being conducted by BITRE, was expected to be finished by June 30, it will now be finalised in “coming months”, the office of Infrastructure and Transport Minister Darren Chester indicated recently.

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia executive director Benjamin Morgan said the BITRE data highlighted a decline in some of the biggest areas of aviation activity.

The Australian has confirmed that AOPA has written to Mr Chester and Civil Aviation Safety Authority boss Shane Carmody drawing attention to the figures.

In a letter last week, Mr Morgan also attached 57 pages of comments from participants in a petition on saving Australia’s general aviation industry.

The BITRE data showed that by hours flown, training was down by 5.6 per cent in 2015 over 2014, and had fallen by 14.5 per cent in 2014 over 2013. Survey and photography work was also well down.

“This isn’t surprising considering that our pilot number graphs and avgas sales numbers all show a 35 per cent decline over the past 10 years,” Mr Morgan said.

He said AOPA’s economic modelling conservatively suggested the decline in the sector over the past five years “translates to a half-billion-dollar loss to the broader Australian economy”.

“AOPA Australia firmly believes the declines have continued through 2016 and are forecast to accelerate through 2017, unless genuine reforms are initiated,” Mr Morgan said. It was alarming that the report showed that one in five aircraft were now unused, because this meant a share of the fleet was “no longer providing an economic contribution to the industry”.

The report showed there were 1367 aircraft zero flying hours where the owners blamed repair, maintenance or restoration work.

The data also showed hours flown for non-scheduled commercial air transport — charter flights — was down 10.9 per cent in 2015 from 2014, and had fallen 17.9 per cent in 2014 over 2013....


[Image: 50hc.png]


Tim1 DAY AGO


I operated a specialist aviation repair company since 1995 . In 2016 I had enough of struggling to keep it afloat after roughly five years of decline in my client base largely caused by the dramatic increase in regulatory burden during that time created by the onerous and protracted regulation overhaul which had numerous direction changes and ended up so burdensome it made small companies like mine unviable and so I closed it down before it destroyed me financially .
There are many stories like mine over that period .


[Image: 50hc.png]


Bing1 DAY AGO



Make it easier and cheaper for folks to fly. Pick from my list or add to the list:
1. For PPL, a checkup by a GP should suffice. Compare it to the expensive bureaucratic CASA system now?!
2. Make military airspace ICAO sized. For example folks can't fly in the beautiful Hawkesbury and Shoalhaven easily because the military has too much airspace, crowding out GA.Most Mil training is on simulators anyway.
3. Don't treat GA pilots and their friends like criminals and terrorists - especially at Albury Airport. They are taxpayers and usually just need the toilets or a drink after re-fuel.
4. Airport landing fees for GA is way too high. Aboriginal run airports charge up to $500 for one landing and nearly $3 per litre for fuel.
5. Why introduce full security screenings at small airports like Dubbo? What a waste of money when you can hop the fence at airports even closer to Sydney?
6. Stop building $5m to $10m fences at places like Thargomindah, Numbulwar, etc. Really, there are cheaper ways to keep out camels and feral animals. Spend the money instead on fostering aviation.
7. Change CASA's charter to include, ".... the fostering of GA in Australia". Otherwise, they'll legislate till there are no GA aircraft in Australia left and they are so stupid they don't realise they'll eventually lose their jobs too.
8. Stop flying 40-50 inspectors around especially to Avalon so they can ramp check and bully GA pilots camping next to their aeroplanes. Grounding a 2 seater plane because there isn't an EXIT sign on the door ... really??

Don't overthink this. Sack lazy and harmful bureaucrats, bring in more performance based salaries and set a mission for CASA to encourage general aviation - not just kill it...

Now give me that $500,000 CEO salary and I'll fix it. On the other hand I'd rather be the Postmaster and earn $5.6m. Carry on....





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philip1 DAY AGO



CASA's role is aviation safety and so they write rules, change rules, hold meetings about rules and police their many rules, seemingly without regard for their impact on smaller aviation businesses and pilots. Many private pilots have a view that CASA might be happier if private pilots and general aviation withered away so CASA only had to manage airlines. CASA is too often seen as an officious dead hand on general aviation.

General aviation provides a massive economic benefit for Australia but it is not as abvious as many other industries because it involves many smaller operators located away from city centres. Unfortunately the Federal government has not seen fit to have any program to support or promote this vital industry, just to regulate it.

The FAA, which regulates safety in the USA, actually has as one of its responsibilities, to encourage and develop civil aeronautics.
Why can't CASA, or Air Services, also have a similar responsibility so their rules and decisions have to support all civil aviation, including general aviation?



Phillip23 HOURS AGO


@philip Yes it always has been one of those"are we here for them or are they here for us" scenarios. 


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Phil17 HOURS AGO



Yes Philip, that is the first and more important cause in the destruction of GA in Australia.
Only reforming of CASA back to the dual role of Safety and Development of aviation (a CAA) will begin this process, everything else is just words.




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Phil18 HOURS AGO

CASA's offical motto should be :
We're not happy till your not happy.
Smile



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Phil18 HOURS AGO



CASAs moto is "safe skys for all".
An empty sky is a safe sky so I guess they have their wish.


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Anthony15 HOURS AGO


I flew as a private glider and private pilot for many years but the endless grind of casa nonsense wore me down now i race Porsche's at a fraction of the expense and without my partner stressing.

The cost of LAME's is a major problem as is the cost of fuel, the greening of australia isnt free.
 
 
MTF...P2 Tongue
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Oz Aviation: Division in the ranks - again!!?? Undecided

From this week's LMH and in an article series by 'that man' it would appear the Alphabets are embarking on a campaign of self-destruction and internal political squabbling -

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]


The Last Minute Hitch: 11 August 2017
10 August 2017

Steve Hitchen

If my mum was here now, she would get RAAus, SAAA, APF, OzRunways, AOPA and AvPlan and bang their heads together! This week in general aviation has been one of the most dire, disappointing and disastrous imaginable. The finger-pointing, accusing and (yes) direct lying that has been going on about the OzRunways sponsorship deal for AirVenture Australia has put the event in jeopardy. Contradiction has followed contradiction, burying the truth deep beneath a pile of vested interest and political posturing. And once again, GA loses; fractured with rivalry and opinion as various different people claim to represent the best interests of the aviation community. So who is the guilty party, the great evil one? It's impossible to tell; guilt can be determined only once true facts are known, and at the moment, despite many claims to the contrary, it seems no-one actually has the true facts in hand. So here's what is known: OzRunways took out major sponsorship that did not include exclusivity. When the AirVenture organisers needed a bit more cash, OzRunways upped their investment, which triggered the exclusivity deal. Consequently, AvPlan was told they couldn't go, and several other companies had conditions placed on them attending, including stalwart Paul Bennet Airshows, which is sponsored by AvPlan. Beyond that, the trail of facts disappears into a dark and whispering fen* that is almost impossible to navigate. The path has led to accusations of smear campaigns, conspiracy theories that run right to the minister's office, power struggles and lawyers being briefed. Now OzRunways has pulled out their major investment, blaming a "membership organisation" that it says leaked the commercial agreement.

Quote:..aviation in Australia needs that complete support today, tomorrow, the rest of the year and well into the foreseeable future..

So are we going to see a unified air show and exhibition at Narromine in October? With only a couple of months to go, can the aviation community possibly heal itself in time? If we want an AirVenture, the healing has to happen. The industry has to put this behind itself and get on with putting together an air show, exhibition and fly-in that is so crucial to the ongoing viablility of general, sport and recreational aviation in Australia. But most importantly, it has to be an event for every one of us; every company, every pilot, every organisation ... because without any one, we don't have complete support, and aviation in Australia needs that complete support today, tomorrow, the rest of the year and well into the foreseeable future. We, the eclectic and enthusiastic keepers of the aviation future, have to recognise some serious mistakes and step up the make sure AirVenture Australia 2017 happens and is successful. Ask yourself this: who wins if AirVenture doesn't go ahead? Then ask: who loses if AirVenture doesn't go ahead? The answer to the first question is "no-one" and the answer to the second is "everybody in aviation". Make no mistake, we have reached a breaking point, and if we can't find a way forward together then how can we ever convince Canberra that our industry, our community, is worth saving.

CASA's discussion paper on drone regulation is now ready for industry comments. This may be just a fringe issue to many of us who are still struggling with AirVenture, Part 61, rising rents, SIDs and every other spear in the side that is depleting our lifeblood at the moment, but you can bet it's very important to the drone community, which I have no doubt will be pouring feedback into CASA. If the general aviation community takes a stand-off approach to this, then the feedback from the drone people is all they will have. It's probably a critical enough issue for general aviation to take notice and speak up, or we certainly won't be listened to on this topic in the future.

To finish on a happy note, I was stoked to see that Warbirds over Scone is back on the calendar! This was for several years a well-attended and well-run air show in a great location. It's bound to be another stonker of an event, so put it in your diary, get a plane organised and make sure you're there in the crowd when Scone goes off in March next year.

*thanks to Glenn Richards for this line. Great lyrics.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...2zRIUcR.99

&.. from the Regional airlines vs the Pilots battlefront:

Chester's regional airport security clusterduck cont/-

..plus the CAO 48.1 WOFTAM:

Quote:And if you wanted an example of just how inept and totally risk-based our big R, WOFTAM regulator is, take a look the latest on the CAO 48.1 debacle - see HERE & yet again today in the Oz [Image: dodgy.gif] : FAA vs CASA: Point of difference. 

Quote: Wrote:CASA’s delays on pilot review spurs concern
[Image: 1de6327bd6ef981304021131f9f99792?width=650]New safety rules for pilots have been further delayed by specialists conducting a review.
  • Annabel Hepworth
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM August 11, 2017

Pilots have voiced fresh concerns at delays by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority over the introduction of new rules on pilot flight and duty time limits.

CASA this week announced the appointment of a team of specialists to conduct a review of the aviation fatigue rules for operators and pilots.

In a statement, CASA confirmed it would extend the implementation of new fatigue rules by six months to allow sufficient time for the recommendations of the review to be considered.

Australian and International Pilots Association vice-president Shane Loney said he understood why there was a delay but was “disappointed this is still going on”.

“We’re disappointed at how slow it is,” he said.

The pilots’ group says Australia is ahead of other countries by introducing the regime but the Regional Aviation Association of Australia argues the new rules impose costs without a commensurate safety gain.

M&M to aviation safety minions: "...I love it when a plan comes together...with gay abandon, let the aviation safety obfuscation games continue.."  Big Grin


MTF...P2 Confused
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Sandy in reply to Hitch - Rolleyes

Quote:My comment which is awaiting Steve's review for publishing on his website, or not, tba.

Hitch does well to provide us with the news of infighting and highlighting the issues that cause problems such as the Narromine airshow contretemps. Narrow and mine can be two words that sum up commercial battles in any field and this is why we have anti monopoly law in Australia.

But I take issue with Hitch on his question "how can we convince Canberra that our industry, our community, is worth saving " on his premise that Canberra is entitled to fiddle while GA burns owing to GA's lack of unity.

Hitch, with respect your take on this is wrong and plays directly into the hands of the Canberra cabal that is bent on preserving pre eminence, privilege, exceptional salaries, working conditions and Winter time excursions on all expenses paid junkets, points North.

One could easily understand from your stance, your common thread, that General Aviation only has to mature, and be of one voice, before we can expect any reforms that might slow or halt the disastrous decline of "our industry, our community ".

In other words you firmly, with shades of patronising, put blame and fault onto the collective of "our industry ".

This will not pass;  this overlooks the scandalous lack of responsibility demonstrated by those whom we employ and pay, firstly the politicians, and secondly what used to be known as the public service. Those that we pay and expect through our democratic and civilised institutions to resolve the competing interests of individuals and groups of individuals with fairness. Governing efficiently allows freedom and prosperity.

GA is being tortured to death and in such a stressful environment its a wonder that there's not more internecine warfare. 

Hitch, I could take you on an excursion around Australia and find hundreds or thousands of abandoned airstrips, closed refueling facilities and closed flying schools (Google Earth for abandoned airfields). Yes its good when we find voice together and a resurgent AOPA gives hope, but we are in a fight and to blame what's left of GA for the current impasse with a do nothing Minister is simply assisting the enemy.
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E bloody nuff - already.

I find, I can live quiet happily with the ‘private’ end of GA tearing itself apart; the contribution to the ‘economy of scale’ just don’ t signify. Same as a golf club – or tennis club – even the local RSL – all tearing at each other with internal – highly personalised – “politics”. That’s their affair and of little interest to me.

But, when the financial or ego fuelled spats become a weapon for the ‘powers that be’ then; it is time to say something. These insignificant, small minded quarrels are like the kids playing up before lights out. One tolerates it – for a short while before the magic words – “if you don’t knock it off - I’m sending Mum up there”.

The ‘real-deal’ GA belongs to the AOC holders; those operating turbine aircraft, lifting heavy loads, doing charters and providing not only useful service, but employment and taxable revenue. It belongs to those who have vision and buy jet aircraft to meet a perceived market demand. GA belongs to those who build up flight schools, invest the house and the kids education in bringing that dream to a reality. The petty squabbles of minority groups cannot possibly be of any significance, whatsoever, in the great scheme of risk and investment in aviation related business.  There would be fuel for the Tupperware  club if there was a charter operator – maybe even a Ginger Beer; there would be ‘facilities’ at remote aerodromes if there was a RPT service; hell, there may even be a local aero club if someone thought there was a living to be made at a rural destination. None of the loud, aggressive ‘private’ groups provide these incentives – they just whine and snivel because those facilities ain’t there. Make me sick. Small children screaming because the ice-cream man ain’t there. Wake up, smell the fire – GA (big, professional end) is burning.

I say: a ducking air show in some misbegotten, bindii infested paddock may well thrill some rubbernecking Looky loo’s and bring in a few dollars for them what runs it. But will any of those toddle off and start the process for an AOC? Will any of the enthusiasts put a brick wall in front of CAO 48.1? How many of them have to live with the unbelievable Part 61 or even Part 135 ? I’ll tell you how many: none of ‘em.

This sort of behavior is not only counterproductive, but provides those who would dismiss ‘GA’ as a rag-tag, amateur lash up with much ammunition to support that case. “I fly for fun” Bully – if things get much worse for the non airline industry section, there won’t be much fun left in it.

Bloody amateurs; get real or shut up. If you can’t do that then please; have your Willy measuring competitions in private. There are those who are trying to preserve jobs and create new ones in a very difficult climate, while attracting the investment they need to grow.

GA is a bit more than a Tupperware jolly in good weather – a lot more. Lead – or follow; but FCOL stay out from under the real GA’s feet.

Yes; I’ve lost my rag about this – so what?

Toot – bloody Toot (FCOL).
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Hitch in reply to Sandy - Rolleyes

(08-13-2017, 07:39 PM)kharon Wrote: E bloody nuff - already.

I find, I can live quiet happily with the ‘private’ end of GA tearing itself apart; the contribution to the ‘economy of scale’ just don’ t signify. Same as a golf club – or tennis club – even the local RSL – all tearing at each other with internal – highly personalised – “politics”. That’s their affair and of little interest to me.

But, when the financial or ego fuelled spats become a weapon for the ‘powers that be’ then; it is time to say something. These insignificant, small minded quarrels are like the kids playing up before lights out. One tolerates it – for a short while before the magic words – “if you don’t knock it off - I’m sending Mum up there”.

The ‘real-deal’ GA belongs to the AOC holders; those operating turbine aircraft, lifting heavy loads, doing charters and providing not only useful service, but employment and taxable revenue. It belongs to those who have vision and buy jet aircraft to meet a perceived market demand. GA belongs to those who build up flight schools, invest the house and the kids education in bringing that dream to a reality. The petty squabbles of minority groups cannot possibly be of any significance, whatsoever, in the great scheme of risk and investment in aviation related business.  There would be fuel for the Tupperware  club if there was a charter operator – maybe even a Ginger Beer; there would be ‘facilities’ at remote aerodromes if there was a RPT service; hell, there may even be a local aero club if someone thought there was a living to be made at a rural destination. None of the loud, aggressive ‘private’ groups provide these incentives – they just whine and snivel because those facilities ain’t there. Make me sick. Small children screaming because the ice-cream man ain’t there. Wake up, smell the fire – GA (big, professional end) is burning.

I say: a ducking air show in some misbegotten, bindii infested paddock may well thrill some rubbernecking Looky loo’s and bring in a few dollars for them what runs it. But will any of those toddle off and start the process for an AOC? Will any of the enthusiasts put a brick wall in front of CAO 48.1? How many of them have to live with the unbelievable Part 61 or even Part 135 ? I’ll tell you how many: none of ‘em.

This sort of behavior is not only counterproductive, but provides those who would dismiss ‘GA’ as a rag-tag, amateur lash up with much ammunition to support that case. “I fly for fun” Bully – if things get much worse for the non airline industry section, there won’t be much fun left in it.

Bloody amateurs; get real or shut up. If you can’t do that then please; have your Willy measuring competitions in private. There are those who are trying to preserve jobs and create new ones in a very difficult climate, while attracting the investment they need to grow.

GA is a bit more than a Tupperware jolly in good weather – a lot more. Lead – or follow; but FCOL stay out from under the real GA’s feet.

Yes; I’ve lost my rag about this – so what?

Toot – bloody Toot (FCOL).

Quote:Sandy Reith • 2 days ago

Hitch does well to provide us with the news of infighting and highlighting the issues that cause problems such as Narromine. Narrow and mine can be two words that sum up commercial battles in any field and this is why we have anti monopoly law in Australia.
But I take issue with Hitch on his question "how can we convince Canberra that our industry, our community, is worth saving " on his premise that Canberra is entitled to fiddle while GA burns owing to GA's lack of unity.

Hitch, with respect your take on this is wrong and plays directly into the hands of the Canberra cabal that is bent on preserving pre eminence, privilege, exceptional salaries, working conditions and Winter time excursions on all expenses paid junkets, points North.

One could easily understand from your stance, your common thread, that General Aviation only has to mature, and be of one voice, before we can expect any reforms that might slow or halt the disastrous decline of "our industry, our community ".

In other words you firmly, with shades of patronising, put blame and fault onto the collective of "our industry ".

This will not pass; this overlooks the scandalous lack of responsibility demonstrated by those whom we employ and pay, firstly the politicians, and secondly what used to be known as the public service. Those that we pay and expect through our democratic and civilised institutions to resolve the competing interests of individuals and groups of individuals with fairness. Governing efficiently allows freedom and prosperity.

GA is being tortured to death and in such a stressful environment its a wonder that there's not more internecine warfare.

Hitch, I could take you on an excursion around Australia and find hundreds or thousands of abandoned airstrips, closed refueling facilities and closed flying schools (Google Earth for abandoned airfields). Yes its good when we find voice together and a resurgent AOPA gives hope, but we are in a fight and to blame what's left of GA for the current impasse with a do nothing Minister is simply assisting the enemy.


SteveHitchen Mod Sandy Reith 11 hours ago

HI, Sandy. You haven't got this quite right. I don't believe that "General Aviation has only to mature, and be of one voice" before we can get genuine reform. This is a limiting statement that is not correct. We have a lot of work to do; a lot of lobbying, analysis, research, promotion, meetings and anything else you can think of that will get our industry going forward. However, none of that will achieve anything without maturity and unity, because the government won't believe the messages we are trying to send. It is not the only thing we need, but it is one of the foundation stones, and the rift over AirVenture has shown Canberra we aren't all pulling in the same direction. Consequently, who are they to believe is right?

And from a email chain:

Quote:General Aviation continues to crumble because there is an inbuilt self destruct mechanism that says all pilots, airplane owners and associations are self interested individuals and never should they get together to survive.
 
So it is divide and conquer from the regulatory authorities. QED.
 
Somehow there needs to be a unite conference with a plan and strategy for the good of aviation.
 
Aminta
Aminta Hennessy OAM


Sandy,

Well said!

Cheers,

Bill H.


MTF...P2 Wink
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Hitch with good news on AirVenture, AOPA & AOPA Oz détente etc.

LMH via the Yaffa... Wink :

Quote:The Last Minute Hitch: 18 August 2017
18 August 2017
Steve Hitchen

AirVenture Australia looks set to go ahead as an event for the whole general aviation community. If this is the case, it's a great win for aviation after a week of what can best be described as blood-letting. With a funding disaster looming on the horizon, the organisers and the backing groups did the only thing they could reasonably do: settled down, went back to their own corners and re-focused getting AirVenture back on track. Thanks to a crowd-funding exercise from the SAAA, it looks like AirVenture is not only a goer, but perhaps even stronger than before. There are still a lot of signatures needed to get it over the line, and we will probably know more in the coming days, but you'd have to say it's looking good. What has come out of all of this most strongly is the signal that the general aviation community really wants a free-spirit national fly-in along the lines of Oshkosh in the USA.

CASA presented the Airvan 10 type certificate to Mahindra/GippsAero this week, marking only the second time a civil turbine-powered aircraft has been certified in Australia. This is a great achievement for the company, and elevates them to the status of serious player in the single-engine turbo-prop game. The path to success for the Airvan 10 won't be straight and narrow, however. Although the aeroplane is aimed at a niche market and theoretically not in competition with the Cessna Caravan and Quest Kodiak, the US manufacturers won't be happy with a more economical alternative eroding their market. GippsAero has already raised the hackles of their American counterparts by producing the Airvan 8 and have taken steps to protect their business, so there's a fair chance if the Airvan 10 starts to take hold over there that they'll react with matching ire. That won't worry GippsAero; that sort of reaction is an indicator you're doing something right.

Quote:"The impact of the letter itself on CASA is unlikely to be shattering.."

On a more friendly USA note, AOPA USA has entered the battle for medical reform in Australia by co-signing a letter to CASA with AOPA Australia laying out all the benefits the BasicMed system has brought to USA pilots. This is a great initative, and I was very pleased to read the letter, but not for the reasons you may think. The impact of the letter itself on CASA is unlikely to be shattering; I doubt there is anything in it that CASA doesn't already know. They will have been watching BasicMed closely and no doubt talking to the FAA about the reasoning behind the initiative, and AOPA USA, whilst powerful in the US, is not quite as influential in Australia. No, for me the real news in this letter is that it indicates a thawing in the often frosty relationship between AOPA and AOPA Australia that has a genesis dated over 15 years ago. Disputes over the use of the name and logo put distance between the two, but this letter shows an vast improvement in co-operation, which comes after a lot of hard work done behind the scenes by benefactors on both sides of the Pacific.

Congratulations to all the winners of the 2017 Wings Awards. It was another competitive field this year that gave the judges a few sleepless nights, knowing that there could be only one winner in each category. Those chosen surely are deserving people and groups that have worked hard for recognition. However, just because a nomination was not successful doesn't mean the candidate was not also deserving; it just highlights how difficult the judge's jobs are. So well done to the winners and the nominators. Personally, I hope the judging panel has the same tough job again next year; it shows how important the Wings Awards have become to general aviation.

By now you will have seen the September-October print issue of Australian Flying. If you haven't you know where to find it: at the nearest decent newsagent.We've got some really good stuff in there including an LSA flight test, the latest in aviation theory delivery, a feature on jump pilot training and the inside story on CASA's Stakeholder Engagement Group. I commissioned the latter feature because CASA seems at last to be walking the talk. Under previous administrations, phrases like "consultation" and "feedback" seemed to be nothing more than squares on a game of Buzzword Bingo, but now they seem to be far more concerned with what the industry thinks. The question that prompted the feature was "is what they're doing actually working?" The results are quite interesting. The issue cover shows a very pretty Ekolot Topaz in flight, which would not have been possible without pilots Stuart Hills and Murray Gerraty, who volunteered their time and skills to get the shot done. Thanks, guys.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...QBkdrCS.99
 
MTF...P2   Tongue
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Airventure update & division in the ranks - Undecided

LMH 25/8/17 via Oz Flying:

Quote:Steve Hitchen

On Tuesday night I addressed a class of aviation students at University of NSW. My subject was, as you could imagine, general aviation. Preparing for the lecture forced me to do a deep analysis of general aviation, all its woes, highlights, strengths and idiocyncracies. The hardest part was to present the material without bias in a manner that would either help these bright young people to one day contribute to the industry themselves, or send them off on quests querying my conclusions. Hopefully I did one of the other. But I got a lot out of the experience myself, and one of those things was a deeper understanding of why I love this general aviation caper. For all it's brickbats, it's an exciting industry to be in, and one that is worth the fight now and for decades to come. Some of those young students will have to take up the standard long after those who carry it now have had to relinquish the task.

Quote:we need to show the minister that we stand united and ready for the task

With less than one week until the Bureau of Infrastructure Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) is scheduled to present their GA Study to the minister, the last thing I wanted to find out is that there appears to be somewhat of a power struggle going on in Canberra. This has nothing to do with parliament or dual citizenship, but rather that factions within the GA community aren't getting on as well as we need them to. If the BITRE study brings forward anything that can give GA a genuine push towards revitalisation, then we need to show the minister that we stand united and ready for the task. He, and his department, will need to believe in us if they are to commit taxpayers' resources to help us out, but at the moment we seem to be showing them a divided community clamouring to be the favourite child. Darren Chester has signalled before that he has an issue with divided opinion, and it seems as we approach a critical crossroads we are offer him just that.

Right, that's it ... AirVenture Australia is going ahead. The announcement today that tickets are on sale from Monday is the Point-of-No-Return for the event, which will now go ahead despite the cloud that has hung over it for nearly a month now. All that is now supposedly sorted, although I suspect there is some residual politicking going on in the background. But largely, the success of AirVenture is now in the hands of the general public and the general, recreational and sport aviators of Australia. If we don't show up in force the event will fail; no amount of sponsorship money or stunning flying displays can possibly be used as measure to declare success without a good crowd turn-out. The whole controversy has scarred the event and left a nasty taste in the mouths of many of us, but it's time now to spit that out and remember why we want this event in the first place.

I am about to go on a bit of a sabbatical, although I doubt without me saying anything anyone would notice. For the month of September I will be handing over the print issue of Australian Flying for Senior Contributor Philip Smart to edit. Philip has been around the aviation industry for a few years and was most recently the editor of Aviation Business, so he's got both the cred and the skills to do a great job. I'll still be here doing the website and The Last Minute Hitch, which is why I suspect no-one will notice my sabbatical. I am going to use the time away from the print mag to explore some possibilities for the Australian Flying website, which have been on the backburner for so long the pot has almost boiled dry.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch


Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...VBxxQqe.99
MTF...P2 Cool
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Seems like Hitch and Karon have their heads together on the "unite or expect little or nothing from government" concept. Both have patronisingly said "bang your heads together (H) or Mum will deal with you (K)."
These arguments suggest that sections General Aviation are to be dealt with like unruly children, in other words both gentlemen doff their lids to a greater power and expect the great power to pull these scallywags into line. K oversteps the mark by one huge leap further by denigrating private flying and its "amateurs".
Having operated RPT, charter and flying school I couldn't disagree more, most of us started in GA and without the private pilot, and all the activity and $billions that that generated, aviation in this country would be even poorer than where its heading today. Yes some didn't have to work as hard to get a start in the hard school of GA because a lucky few got Her Maj to pay multi $millions in fuel, equipment, maintenance and She even threw in accomodation. Maybe unconsciously this is where some people like to throw back to a greater power, the big Mum.
Besides to denigrate your fellow citizens who want simply to enjoy their flying and who will put up with the odd bindi in underwing sleeping bag is not right. Not to mention all those who need their aircraft in the bush just as Karon drives his car "privately".

K, mate, its a different world, we want better, we want reasonable, and we are not getting it. We should not have to pay $283 every 2 years for aviation ID, ridiculous AVMED, unworkable flying school and maintenance rules, etc.

Hitch doesn't spray on the private pilots but tells us that we must be all of one voice because the Minister has let on that he's more inclined to listen if all are good boys and girls singing from the same hymn sheet like the pacified angels he'd like us to be. Hitch tells us that when we are all together with the dear Minister there's so much work still to be done.

No there's not. Mate where have you been all these years? All the inquiries and recommendations have been made.

No more talk, no more inquiries or consultations, pussyfooting, obscurantist mumbo jumbo or bureaucratic double speak.

The Parliament has to act, like the US where Congress required the FAA to cause sensible reform of their AVMED rules. Independent instructors and car driver medicals first off the block.
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Hitch fired up in this week's LMH - Confused

This week's Oz Flying weekly wrap from Hitch is IMO one of the most significant posts that he has written and in the process he has gazumped us for seeing the GA kick in the guts contained within the CASA released Part 139 NPRM - again well done that man! Wink

Quote:[Image: SH_Nov13_AF904AE0-3498-11E4-82B0020AB1EB208A.jpg]

The Last Minute Hitch: 1 September 2017
1 September 2017

CASA's aerodrome NPRM has a couple of barbs for general aviation, hidden quite well amongst the foliage of official language in which the paper is written. Firstly is the new definitions of airports as "regulated" or "unregulated": they are to be defined by whether or not they have instrument procedures. So if I get this right, if an aerodrome has instrument procedures it must be in the regulated category, and if the operator prefers to stay unregulated, then they have to surrender any IFR approaches relating to their airport. This reflects the decision taken by CASA several years ago that removed RNAVs from private airports. Around 30 airports in the country lost their RNAVs because CASA considered it unsafe, deciding instead it was safer for IFR pilots to make their own way home as best they could. It was a bewildering decision then, and even more bewildering now they have enshrined that attitude in their latest NPRM. How can it be safer to deny a technology that was designed to make the approach safe? Their arguments held little validity then, and the years have not vindicated their position.

Quote: this happens too often to be tempered by denials and soothing statements ...

The second issue I have with the paper are the people who wrote it. A project team from the Standards Consultative Committee is behind the paper; a team made up of representatives of major airports, the Australian Airports Association (AAA), Airservices, CASA, the department, some industry specialists and believe it or not, the Gliding Federation of Australia. Not a mention of anyone from Bankstown, Moorabbin, Jandakot or any other capital city or regional GA airport. An argument that the AAA represents their interests raises queries about why the major airports get independent representation. Are they not AAA members too? The lack of respect for the opinions and expertise of general aviation people shown by Canberra is again thrust into the spotlight, and this happens too often to be tempered by denials and soothing statements of being valued. They aren't close to being any form of consolation.

BITRE's much anticipated GA Study report is still in the works. Due no later that yesterday, I suppose it is now officially overdue. Even when it does come, it's first port of call will be the General Aviation Advisory Group, which will sit down and comb through it before handing the final version to Minister Darren Chester. What the minister does with it then is what we, the general aviation community, are really keen to find out. But we could be waiting a while. The minister still has to decide not only what the report says in real terms, but also what his government, if anything, is going to do about it. That is going to mean one of two things: taking the time to devise a committed action plan for general aviation, or constructing a response justifying why they are going to do nothing. Meanwhile, we who look hopefully up to the ivory tower have to wait to see if our pleas have been heard.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/the-l...T4Hdzsy.99
 
Wink Wink - Hmm.. and believe it or not even Sandy pays Hitch a compliment... Rolleyes
Quote:Sandy Reith • 15 hours ago

Hitch really on the money and with very good reason to be bewildered. They promulgated an NDB approach to my private and non registered airport due to my own operations and regular IFR charter inbound traffic. What was wrong with that?

Reality is that CASA is not interested in safety, the whole shooting match is merely to water the bureaucratic money tree and fireproof the Minister.

At a nearby regional airport, a senior instructor having paid $8000 upfront for a flying school operator application, was told to consider if the planned office wall placement of the still not granted Air Operator Certificate (AOC) was appropriate. This was apparently another big negative sufficient to further delay the grant of the AOC. The AOC still nowhere in sight after 18 months. I appraised CASA Chairman Jeff Boyd of this scandalous rip off last year, he informed me that CASA has a standard manual for this and it should be ok! Well Jeff it isn't ok.

No such mad paper war or huge rip off fee gouging in the US, a senior instructor is qualified and can teach anywhere straight up.

BITRE and it's General Aviation (GA) activity (decline) report.

Very funny, as if they don't know with all the history of the last 30 years, fuel sales, flying school numbers, active pilot numbers, instructor numbers, GA fleet utilisation, second hand aircraft values (collapsed), maintenance organisations including engine, propeller, radio, paint and apprentices, Designated Medical Examiners, ALL DOWN. And not just a little, GA is a disaster area.
Standing by for incoming...MTF - P2 Big Grin
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