Alphabet if’s and but's.
(08-28-2018, 06:47 PM)Kharon Wrote: Knee jerk or Jerk?

I think it would be wise to wait and read the full article in Australian Flying. Dick Smith says :-

“(By the way, the September/October 2018 issue of Australian Flying is one of the best issues that has ever come out – it would have taken a lot of hard work. Congratulations to everyone involved.)”

Before we sort out exactly what Monck was rattling on about:

Dick Smith – “In an article in the September/October 2018 issue of Australian Flying headed “Monck on changing the Act” it states that he is not supporting my proposed change to the Act.”

Monck - “… I think by making the Act dual purpose, I think we are opening ourselves up to trouble like we saw in the US…”

BUT – a big one; if RAA are even thinking that the Act does not need changing, then they are ignoring the root of all evil; for that is where the CASA power to do exactly what they’ve been doing is drawn from. Break the Act – break the Iron Ring. Although without the onerous impositions on ‘real’ flying in proper aircraft, RAA have no real purpose – do they. If AOPA had the same concessions – in law, that RAA have (and restrictions for the medically challenged), with an even playing field; then it would be a whole different ball game. Just saying.

By the by – Seems as though AOPA had a very good session with the Senate Committee; positive and productive. Hansard will tell the tale properly. Well done – again – AOPA. Watch now as the CASA board tries to cuddle up and mend fences with AOPA. Typical behaviour of the clan, start a brawl then cry foul because they were only kidding. BOLLOCKS. Don’t start it, if you can’t finish it – that’s what I taught my younglings. IF, big one, CASA suddenly want to mend the fences, it is only because AOPA have hurt them; not beaten them, but hurt them. Aye - Beware the angry man – Machiavelli understood this very, very well.

“If an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that his vengeance need not be feared”.

Don’t care; darts practice in half an hour and we have Canadian visitors this evening to entertain. Should be fun – hat, coat, darts – Ale awaits (P7’s shout) – gods sparing – weather permitting that is….

Toot toot

Bye the bye AGAA members unite behind AOPA Oz... Wink 

Via the SAAA Facebook page:

[url=https://www.facebook.com/sportaircraftassociationaustralia/?ref=nf&hc_ref=ARSzH-w0RDLitQ5KyZtUrg9WVmt7v2UaBeWGfQ96WlQrUAbXMYJPChidccOiyn65WoI][/url][Image: 38641236_1273857779418894_66252241620445...e=5BF088AA]
Sport Aircraft Association of Australia

August 22 

A message from AMROBA, one of the partners in the Australian General Aviation Aliance supporting the AOPA 'Freedom to Fly' and referencing the AOPA logo from 1939.

[Image: 39753199_1304599296344742_72557395087196...e=5C323D71] 
MTF? - No doubt...P2  Rolleyes
Reply
From the sheep’s arse to your ears.

It is probably only a wind driven rumour, but it’s vile, even if only half true. I shall paraphrase what was whispered to me, for there are big ears with long knives waiting to pounce on those who dare tell the truth.


“CASA want to kiss and make up with AOPA”.

There is no way Morgan and his AOPA crew can take their foot of the gas pedal now, to do so would be a serious mistake. Until there are some ‘deep and meaningful’ changes made and tangible proof that those changes are real, there can be no armistice. And anyway, there is too much momentum to the reform movement for anyone to resile from their position, not with any credibility at least.

There are so many small things which could be done to promote peace and goodwill, these would show a willingness, without a CASA loss of face, to accept the demands of industry. Proof positive of reform and good sense.

For example, acquiesce to the changes in the ACT, that would be a win-win for both parties.  An even better peace offering, and a great place to demonstrate willingness would be to redraft the preface to the infamous ‘Enforcement Manual’; which still is as blatant an insult now as it was the day McConvict signed the wretched thing. Let’s have it redrafted as a token of good faith. Of course, Carmody could ‘release’ several of his people to spend more time with their remaining marbles or families. That would open the door for people who would be happy to assist making CASA a decent corporate citizen, model litigant and an agency this country, government and industry could be proud of.

Actions not words. The very thought of AOPA ‘working’ within the existing system, as it stands is the stuff of nightmares. AOPA has the whip hand, they need to  keep using it, as hard and as often as required. Motivation should come from the disgraceful treatment the good Rev. Forsyth’s ‘opinions’ were given, before they were pissed on and tossed into the skip.

Then again, this probably all a faery story, told to frighten the children. I seriously hope that is the case. Because if AOPA back off, CASA win and it will be another 30 years before the aviation rules are decriminalized, let alone reduced in volume and made ‘safe’ for industry to work within.

The gas driven pellet of sheep pooh, parading as minister could make the changes happen almost overnight. Perhaps that is where CASA could begin the peace process – by whispering to him that changes to the Act would be a jolly good thing. Now that would indeed pave the way peace in our time. But until tangible proof of change is presented, Morgan would be a mug to take his foot off the gas pedal.

Thank the gods its only a rumour; because if there is any substance to it, then not only has nothing changed, but the entrenched opposition to change has just tried to blindside the call for the change. Let’s wait and see.

Toot – toot.
Reply
QF flying school X 2 confirmed - 

Via Oz Flying: 

Quote:[Image: QF_747.jpg]

Qantas commits to Second Academy Location
29 August 2018

Qantas announced last week that it is looking for two locations around Australia to establish flying training academies instead of only one as originally stated.

According to the airline, the second location has become necessary because of the forecast demand for pilots and the interest the airline has received for flight training.

Plans for the Qantas Group Pilot Academy were announced in February this year and it’s expected the first site will be operational during 2019. Nine regional cities across Australia – Alice Springs, Bendigo, Busselton, Dubbo, Launceston, Mackay, Tamworth, Toowoomba and Wagga Wagga – have been shortlisted as potential sites, with an announcement expected in the next few weeks.

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said that initial scoping had shown that two locations would be needed to reach the academy’s potential.

“We’re aiming to train up to 100 pilots in year one but we expect this to grow to as many as 500 a year and that can only be achieved if we have more than one location,” he said.
“Adding up to 250 students plus instructors and support staff to any of these places needs the right infrastructure at airports, but also in the towns themselves.

“The academy represents a commercial opportunity for Qantas, but it’s also important for the future of Australian aviation. We expect that pilots completing their training with the academy could fly for other airlines, the defence force or services like the Royal Flying Doctors.”

Boeing’s latest estimates show that 790,000 more pilots will be required globally over the next 20 years, around one third of them in Asia Pacific, figures which have led to Qantas entering the flight training market.

According to Qantas, almost 17,000 people have so far registered their interest in the Qantas Group Pilot Academy, 16% of which are femaie, a mark much higher than the current industry participation of 3% female.


Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...EIfSWUI.99



&..

Race for Qantas pilot academy
[Image: 4f9c7ae034c4f7df142858fe9c9e8f2c]ROBYN IRONSIDE
Regional towns are battling it out to secure the lucrative addition of one of two new Qantas pilot academies.
Good news followed by bad news... Dodgy
SA TAFE LAME cock-up update:

Via the Oz:
Quote:Training bungle hits taxpayers
[Image: aa3ebe205e65723fbb267c042b197095]MICHAEL OWEN
Almost 90 aircraft maintenance ­engineers have been paid more than $2 million after their licences were revoked.

Almost 90 Australian and international aircraft maintenance ­engineers have been paid more than $2 million in compensation and retraining fees after their ­licences were revoked in the wake of a training bungle at TAFE SA.

A routine Civil Aviation Safety Authority audit early last year, which ultimately led to a widespread TAFE SA training scandal affecting about 800 students across 16 “substandard” courses, found the aircraft maintenance training course was non-­compliant.

The training bungle was ­exposed during an investi­gation by The Weekend Australian.

Former Labor skills minister Susan Close, who is now state Deputy Opposition Leader, was informed of the investigation five months earlier, but had kept it from the public.

The incident saw Qantas no longer use TAFE SA for training.

South Australian Treasurer Rob Lucas, who will deliver the new Liberal government’s first budget next week, said the TAFE SA settlement would cover the cost of students’ lost wages, re-training fees, and accommodation and airfares for interstate and overseas students.

The cost to taxpayers includes sending TAFE SA staff on “travelling roadshows” across Australia to conduct their retraining.

“This whole sorry saga is just another example of the sheer incompetence of the former Labor government and the mess they’ve left us to clean up,’’ Mr Lucas said yesterday.

“Aircraft maintenance training students — who had paid around $5000 to $10,000 for a module and up to $52,000 for a full ­diploma — were told their licences were invalid and forced to suspend all work directly related to them.”

There were only three other centres in the country offering the training: TAFE NSW, Aviation Australia and Federation Training in Gippsland, Victoria.

Mr Lucas said four students from Dili, East Timor, had paid $98,000 to take the course at the Parafield Airport campus of TAFE SA and sit their exams.

“On the advice of the Crown Solicitor’s Office, the government is now covering their lost wages and paying for them to be retrained but, because many of them live interstate, there is an added $1m cost to fly TAFE SA staff on travelling roadshows to Darwin, Cairns, Brisbane and Perth to conduct the retraining,” Mr Lucas said.

He said the total cost to compensate 87 students was $2,037,888. There also was significant international brand damage to TAFE SA, he said.

The taxpayer-funded payout is among more than $12m in claims the Marshall government is ­settling with about 100 victims of previous issues that occurred on the watch of the former Labor government, including the Oakden aged-care scandal, chemotherapy under-dosing, missed breast cancer detection and Pathology SA’s incorrect prostate test results.

Mr Lucas said there would be a big hit to the state’s budget from TAFE SA’s problems, including a “very significant” operating cost blowout for vocational training courses.

“It is the government’s view that TAFE SA (still) has an important role to play, if properly managed,” Mr Lucas said.

Quote:Course crash costs millions
[Image: 59a1e3bb48b0fb30c7f74b977dfc54e0]MICHAEL OWEN

The SA government has paid out 87 TAFE aircraft maintenance students who had their licences revoked after a damning audit.

The South Australian government has paid more than $2 million in compensation and retraining fees to 87 TAFE SA aircraft maintenance training course students who had their licences revoked following a damning Civil Aviation Safety Authority audit.

The audit early last year, which led to the exposure of a widespread TAFE SA training scandal affecting about 800 students across 16 “substandard” courses, found the aircraft maintenance training course was non-compliant for a number of reasons.

It was only after an investigation by The Weekend Australian that the serious training bungle was exposed in September last year.

Former Labor skills minister Susan Close, who is now the opposition’s deputy leader, was informed of the investigation five months earlier, but kept it from the public.

The incident saw Qantas no longer use TAFE SA for training.

South Australian Treasurer Rob Lucas, who will deliver the new government’s first budget next week, said the TAFE SA settlement would cover the cost of students’ lost wages, retraining fees, accommodation and airfares for interstate and overseas students — as well as the cost of sending TAFE SA staff on “travelling roadshows” across Australia to conduct the retraining.

“This whole sorry saga is just another example of the sheer incompetence of the former Labor government and the mess they’ve left us to clean up,’’ Mr Lucas said today.

“Aircraft maintenance training students — who had paid around $5000 to $10,000 for a module and up to $52,000 for a full Diploma — were told their licences were invalid and forced to suspend all work directly related to them.”

There were only three other centres in the country offering the training: TAFE NSW, Aviation Australia and Federation Training in Gippsland, Victoria.

Mr Lucas said four students from Dili, East Timor had paid $98,000 to take the course at the Parafield Airport campus of TAFE SA and sit their exams.

“On the advice of the Crown Solicitor’s Office, the government is now covering their lost wages and paying for them to be retrained but, because many of them live interstate, there is an added $1m cost to fly TAFE SA staff on travelling roadshows to Darwin, Cairns, Brisbane and Perth to conduct the retraining,” Mr Lucas said.

The taxpayer-funded payout is among more than $12m in claims the Marshall government is settling with around 100 victims of previous issues on the watch of the former Labor government, including the Oakden scandal, chemotherapy under-dosing, missed breast cancer detection and Pathology SA’s incorrect prostate test results.

MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
SURPRISED??? HARDLY.

“Almost 90 Australian and international aircraft maintenance ­engineers have been paid more than $2 million in compensation and retraining fees after their ­licences were revoked in the wake of a training bungle at TAFE SA”.

Just another moronic Government department screwing up and costing the taxpayer millions.
Governments, ha, how laughable. Useless, pathetic dipshits turning everything they touch and everything they do into steaming piles of excrement!
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Top stuff Wellsy Wink

Via the Oz today:

Quote:Local flight school inks Asia deal
[Image: d8a00f93ffd9fe0bce0a7939467aff64]MATTHEW DENHOLM
About 75 Malaysian pilots will be trained in Tasmania each year under a deal between the state’s regional airline and Air Asia.


Local flight school in deal to train 75 Air Asia pilots

About 75 Malaysian pilots will be trained in Tasmania each year under a landmark deal between the state’s regional airline and Air Asia.

The managing director of Hobart-based Par Avion, Shannon Wells, told The Australian the deal showed that Australian flight schools could play a role in addressing the global pilot shortage.

An initial 10 Malaysians who had started their flight training in Malaysia would come to Hobart in the next month to complete their qualifications.

“Then, provided the Malaysian government is happy with the standard we set, Air Asia is intending to send about 75 pilots to Tasmania to learn to fly, which is really exciting,” Mr Wells said.

“The pilot shortage is getting pretty serious but hopefully we play a bit of a role in Tasmania. We’ve got the airspace, we’ve got the great education standards, the weather and the terrain. It’s the perfect place.

“Air Asia is rapidly expanding across Southeast Asia and while they’ve got lots of cadets that want to fly for them, there is a real lack of infrastructure in the country to train up the vast numbers that they want.”

Air Asia spokesman Kris Taute said the deal was part of the airline’s global training program, which offered new cadets “the opportunity to learn from some of the best instructors and aviation training schools”.

“In the coming year, around 75 new recruits will undertake their CPL (commercial pilot licence) and instrument training under the direction of an Australian instructor, alongside nine months of practical training in Hobart,” Mr Taute said.

Mr Wells said it was the first deal of its kind for Tasmania. “It means five to 10 more (instructor) jobs for us and we have to invest millions of dollars more in aircraft,” he said.

It may also require Par Avion to expand its current Hobart pilot school, based at Cambridge Aerodrome, to new operations in Devonport, in the state’s northwest.

Australian pilots and flight schools have long complained the shortage of pilots in this country is in part linked to the excessive and costly regulatory burden of training pilots for domestic aviation.

In recent years, some Australian pilot schools have been taken over by Chinese companies to meet their needs, while Australia has allowed the use of foreign ­pilots on skills shortage visas.

At the same time, Asian airlines have poached senior Australian pilots and instructors.

Mr Wells said his company’s deal with Air Asia showed that Australian flying schools could play a role in addressing the global pilot shortage.

“It has cost a lot of money in (regulatory) approvals, a lot of administration, so it is difficult. But if you can find an opportunity, there is demand,” he said.

“There are lots of (pilot) schools across the country desperate to grow and expand their ­businesses.

“It’s just a matter of whether they have the money, the time and the patience to do it.”
MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
TAAAF and the ASAP show their true colours -   Confused

I kind of predicted this was going to happen because apparently there is a large rift appearing in the Oz aviation safety matrix... Dodgy

Via the Yaffa:

Quote:[Image: AOPA_logo_5B563F10-5C0C-11E5-A89F02ED0340CAB3.jpg]




Spat erupts over ASAP Endorsement of Medical Policy

14 September 2018

AOPA Australia has targeted The Australian Aviation Assocations Forum (TAAAF) after the forum endorsed the CASA position that driver's licence medicals would not be available for general aviation pilots.

TAAAF is part of CASA's Aviation Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) and is one of the few members of the panel that represents general aviation organisations.

In November last year, CASA asked ASAP members to agree to the new medical reforms, which cleared the way for the Basic Class 2 and other changes to be implemented this year. The policy presented to the panel included the following statement.

While there have been industry calls for a 'self-certification' standard similar to that introduced in the US, the requisite training requirements were considered ultimately more complex and with less integrity of outcome compared to a routine 'Austroads' review by any GP.

Self-certification is currently allowed for RAAus pilots and members of the Gliding Federation of Australia.

Meeting notes show that ASAP endorsed the new policy, which AOPA says shows that TAAAF is not providing proper representation of general aviation needs.

"AOPA Australia mounted a very public campaign throughout 2016/2017 to reform Australia’s private pilot medical certification, seeking a self-certification standard based on the Austroads Private Drivers Licence," AOPA CEO Ben Morgan said in an e-mail to TAAAF members.

"Our submission to CASA was supported by over 1,700+ signatures, representing the largest volume of response to the entire consultation process.

"It is certain that the TAAAF Chairman was given clear and concise advance notice of CASA’s proposed policy and failed to pass this information back to the TAAAF forum where it could have been discussed and actioned by its members.

" ... TAAAF’s acceptance of CASA’s medical reform policy has significantly disadvantaged the aircraft owner and pilot community and has denied the general aviation industry an advancement with respect to genuine reform, whilst at the same time handing CASA the opportunity to claim, ‘you the GA industry accepted it’.

"Sham consultation, sham representation, utterly shameful behaviour."

TAAAF Honorary Chairman Greg Russell told Australian Flying that he has no recollection of AOPA raising the issue of medicals before AOPA resigned as a member of TAAAF, and that meeting notes don't reflect that the AOPA policy was tabled at any stage.

However, TAAAF meeting notes from 8 December 2016 do show that AOPA asked TAAAF to adopt the AOPA policy on Class 2 medicals.

Ben Morgan stated to Australian Flying that he believed the general aviation community should be "bitterly disappointed that TAAAF has misrepresented the industry. The members of TAAAF were aware of the AOPA policy," he said, "and any statements to the contrary have been loose with the truth."

Russell has declined to issue any response to AOPA's accusations, but did say that TAAAF had voted to approve the new policy.

Jim Davis, Chairman of the The Regional Aviation Association of Australia (RAAA), which is a member of ASAP and TAAAF, said they had also no knowledge of AOPA's position.

"The RAAA supported the [medical] reforms as they contained some changes that Mike [Higgins - RAAA CEO] had been pushing for some time such as allowing Instructors to have Class 2 medicals," he said in response to Morgan's e-mail.

"However I was not aware of the AOPA campaign for changes to PVT medicals so unfortunately it was not part of our decision in supporting the new rules."

TAAAF's last aviation policy was released in 2016, before AOPA became a member organisation, and makes no mention of a medical reform policy.
 

Read more at http://www.australianflying.com.au/lates...yL0QUwj.99


MTF...P2  Cool
Reply
Via Oz Aviation... Wink

Quote:AND THE WINNER IS ….. TOOWOOMBA!
written by Australianaviation.Com.Au September 27, 2018

[Image: Site-Aerial.jpg?w=1170]

Construction of the academy’s new facilities at Wellcamp Airport will commence next month.[/i][/align]

Qantas has announced Wellcamp Airport in Toowoomba as the first of two sites for its pilot training academy.

The facility at Wellcamp Airport, which will be built to handle up to 250 students a year and will comprise a new hangar, classrooms and accommodation facilities, is expected to open in mid-2019, Qantas announced on Thursday.

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and Wellcamp Airport owner and operator Wagner Corporation director Denis Wagner made the official announcement at Wellcamp Airport.


Quote:[Image: LocutS5f_normal.jpg]
Robyn Ironside @ironsider

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce announcing Toowoomba’s Wellcamp Airport will be the site of the first Qantas pilot training academy.

[Image: DoD2f6HU8AAxQPV.jpg]
10:22 AM - Sep 27, 2018


Construction of the $35 million facility is expected to start in October, with the “majority of this funding contributed from private sector partners”.

Further, Qantas said L3 Commercial Aviation will be the training provider for the Toowoomba site. It will be the company’s first training school in Australia. Qantas said L3 will use a mix of modern single and twin-engine aircraft with glass cockpits to support the training.

Joyce said the pitch from the airport, state and local governments, and the local community convinced Qantas that Toowoomba was a great choice.
“Toowoomba will be an amazing place to learn to fly,” Joyce said in a statement.

“It’s home to Australia’s newest airport and offers over 300 days of Queensland sunshine each year and an environment that is textbook for pilot training.

“In partnership with the Queensland Government and the Wagner Corporation, who own the airport, we’ll build state-of-the-art training facilities and student accommodation. What we’re ultimately creating is a world-class pilot school for students from Australia and around the globe.”

Wellcamp was chosen from a list of nine shortlisted regional centres announced earlier in 2018.

Qantas planned to have a second location for its flight school up and running by 2020, with the remaining eight cities on the shortlist – Alice Springs, Bendigo, Busselton, Dubbo, Launceston, Mackay, Tamworth and Wagga Wagga were still under consideration for the second academy site.

[Image: r0_243_2500_1651_w1200_h678_fmax-e153499...jpg?w=1170]

Qantas plans to establish the Qantas Group Pilot Academy, expected to open its doors during 2019. (Qantas)

The airline said about 18,000 people have registered their interest in the academy.

Premier Palaszczuk welcomed the investment being made in Toowoomba.
“The Q in Qantas stands for Queensland and it’s clear that home is where Qantas’s heart is,” Palaszczuk said in the Qantas statement.

Wagner said the world-class facilities would “enhance the training opportunities for our future airline pilots”.

“This decision by the Qantas Group highlights that when the private sector, Australia’s national carrier, the Queensland State Government and our local Council work cohesively, we can achieve a long term economically sustainable future for our regional communities,” Wagner said.


[Image: WCamp-1stFlight-2.jpg?w=750]
A QantasLink Q400 touches down at Wellcamp Airport. (Wellcamp)
Reply
(09-28-2018, 12:07 AM)Peetwo Wrote: Via Oz Aviation... Wink

Quote:AND THE WINNER IS ….. TOOWOOMBA!
written by Australianaviation.Com.Au September 27, 2018

[Image: Site-Aerial.jpg?w=1170]

Construction of the academy’s new facilities at Wellcamp Airport will commence next month.[/i][/align]

Qantas has announced Wellcamp Airport in Toowoomba as the first of two sites for its pilot training academy.

The facility at Wellcamp Airport, which will be built to handle up to 250 students a year and will comprise a new hangar, classrooms and accommodation facilities, is expected to open in mid-2019, Qantas announced on Thursday.

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and Wellcamp Airport owner and operator Wagner Corporation director Denis Wagner made the official announcement at Wellcamp Airport.


Quote:[Image: LocutS5f_normal.jpg]
Robyn Ironside @ironsider

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce announcing Toowoomba’s Wellcamp Airport will be the site of the first Qantas pilot training academy.

[Image: DoD2f6HU8AAxQPV.jpg]
10:22 AM - Sep 27, 2018


Construction of the $35 million facility is expected to start in October, with the “majority of this funding contributed from private sector partners”.

Further, Qantas said L3 Commercial Aviation will be the training provider for the Toowoomba site. It will be the company’s first training school in Australia. Qantas said L3 will use a mix of modern single and twin-engine aircraft with glass cockpits to support the training.

Joyce said the pitch from the airport, state and local governments, and the local community convinced Qantas that Toowoomba was a great choice.
“Toowoomba will be an amazing place to learn to fly,” Joyce said in a statement.

“It’s home to Australia’s newest airport and offers over 300 days of Queensland sunshine each year and an environment that is textbook for pilot training.

“In partnership with the Queensland Government and the Wagner Corporation, who own the airport, we’ll build state-of-the-art training facilities and student accommodation. What we’re ultimately creating is a world-class pilot school for students from Australia and around the globe.”

Wellcamp was chosen from a list of nine shortlisted regional centres announced earlier in 2018.

Qantas planned to have a second location for its flight school up and running by 2020, with the remaining eight cities on the shortlist – Alice Springs, Bendigo, Busselton, Dubbo, Launceston, Mackay, Tamworth and Wagga Wagga were still under consideration for the second academy site.

[Image: r0_243_2500_1651_w1200_h678_fmax-e153499...jpg?w=1170]

Qantas plans to establish the Qantas Group Pilot Academy, expected to open its doors during 2019. (Qantas)

The airline said about 18,000 people have registered their interest in the academy.

Premier Palaszczuk welcomed the investment being made in Toowoomba.
“The Q in Qantas stands for Queensland and it’s clear that home is where Qantas’s heart is,” Palaszczuk said in the Qantas statement.

Wagner said the world-class facilities would “enhance the training opportunities for our future airline pilots”.

“This decision by the Qantas Group highlights that when the private sector, Australia’s national carrier, the Queensland State Government and our local Council work cohesively, we can achieve a long term economically sustainable future for our regional communities,” Wagner said.


[Image: WCamp-1stFlight-2.jpg?w=750]
A QantasLink Q400 touches down at Wellcamp Airport. (Wellcamp)

Via the Oz today: https://www.theaustralian.com.au/busines...c538c8be38

Quote:Wagners to build Qantas academy
[Image: 6cd562af70108cfaf3fdf3ffd446ab3a]ROBYN IRONSIDE
The Toowoomba family that built an airport in 19 months will establish a Qantas pilot academy by the middle of next year.


The Toowoomba family that built a new airport in 19 months has been tasked to establish the first Qantas Pilot Training Academy by the middle of next year.

The Wagners, who recently won a $3.7 million defamation lawsuit against broadcaster Alan Jones, are stumping up much of the $35m cost of the new facilities at their Wellcamp Airport.

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce flew into Toowoomba yesterday to announce the site of the first flight school, with the US-based L3 Commercial Aviation as the training provider.

Although Qantas will have a presence on site, the airline was unable to say how many of its own employees would work there.

Mr Joyce said the “best airport had won” the race for the first academy, with a further eight cities still in the running for a second ­facility.

“They had the best proposition in terms of facilities, the time frame, the community where people can be based, the attractiveness of it, the location to Brisbane and the world gateway,” he said.

“And having the Queensland government getting fully behind it was critical, and having the Wagners as the airport owners getting fully behind it.”

Denis Wagner said the family expected a good return on its “significant investment” in the academy through a commercial arrangement with Qantas.

“Our obligations are to have it operational by July next year so work will start in the morning,” Mr Wagner said.

“The academy is on our land so we’ll have a commercial arrangement with Qantas to provide those facilities on an annual basis.”

Mr Joyce said in the first year, 250 pilots would be trained at the academy for the Qantas Group but in future years the two training academies would turn out pilots for other airlines.

With industry forecasts suggesting an additional 790,000 pilots would be needed worldwide in the next 20 years, demand was expected to be high, he said.

“Given the Qantas brand name for the selection and training of pilots is second to none, we think we can use that to actually make it a business opportunity,” said Mr Joyce. “That’s why we’re making it two schools. We will not need 500 pilots a year for Qantas so a significant amount of those will be for other airlines and overseas training.”

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk applauded the decision but would not reveal how much money taxpayers had pitched in to secure the facility.


MTF...P2  Tongue
Reply
Congratulations to the Wagner's and via their tenacity, drive and innovation the people of toowoomba.

I have been lead to believe an American company will actually run the school side of things.

Wonder what they will make of the "Australian" way of teaching people to fly as opposed to the US?
Hope they have made allowance in their budget for vast amounts of crushed tree's that will be needed.
Thousands of pages of manuals to write against thousands of pages of regulations. Thousands of pages
of boxes to be ticked to establish compliance. Hundreds of thousands of dollars expended before they even
buy an airplane to train in.

I find it passing strange that Quaintass built their heavy maintenance hub in North America, allegedly because it was more cost effective, but some would say to escape Australian red tape, yet decide to base their training school in Australia.
Comparing the cost of training and red tape here compared with there and also the US is a far safer place to fly, the decision is puzzling.
Reply
Off the backhand.

TB – “Comparing the cost of training and red tape here compared with there and also the US is a far safer place to fly, the decision is puzzling”.

Oh, don’t know that it’s a puzzle TB – I reckon the minister wants to piggy-back on the Qantas effort to sort out the mess left by successive useless ministers and tame, CASA trained ‘advisors’. Mind you, I hear that the Big Q application for a part 142 tick is having a rough ride; been knocked back a couple of times – CASA know best etc.

You’d reckon, just for ease and economy, Big Q would tell ‘em to bugger off and just do all  their training in the USA; I suspect quiet deals have been done over a coffee; the minister can then say – hand on heart – that the government have moved to ‘sort’ the pilot shortage problem. Disgusting – but hey, you can still drink the water; provided you live far enough away from an aerodrome that is.

Toot – toot.
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